EPISODE 4: ALBERT GONZALES, RECRUITER ACT 1 STAFFING AGENCY

EPISODE 4:  ALBERT GONZALES, RECRUITER ACT 1 STAFFING AGENCY

In this Ask The Expert interview, ACT 1 STAFFING AGENCY recruiter, Albert Gonzales gives host, John Malos an inside look at the Central Valley's job market, gives insider tips on how to land your next job, and advises not to give up. Two callers today. Keep those calls coming for John and his guests. Viewers can always call in to (559) 265-4331 or (800) 717-1302.

Eyebrow Tattoo Before and After ♥ Everything you need to know 3D Korean Eyebrow Tattoo Temporary

Eyebrow Tattoo Before and After ♥ Everything you need to know 3D Korean Eyebrow Tattoo Temporary

JOIN THE FAMILY ➜ http://bit.ly/make-life-beautiful Everything you need to know about Korean 3D Eyebrow Tattoo's!! How long does it take? How long does an eyebrow tattoo last? What is the hair stroke like? How much does the procedure cost? (at least for me) Does it hurt? What is the healing process like? Can the tattoo be removed or does it last? I answer all these questions in this video for you guys! If you want the contact details about where I went to and some more detailed information about the process please click on my blog post below: http://www.wengie.com/2015/01/korean-3d-eyebrow-tattoo-everything-you.html Make life beautiful: http://bit.ly/make-life-beautiful ----- FIND ME ----- Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wwwengie Twitter: @wengie Instagram: @misswen Blog: www.wengie.com ----- MY OTHER CHANNELS ----- VLOG and Real Talks: http://www.youtube.com/lifeofwengie Music/Dance and Kpop Covers: http://www.youtube.com/wengieofficial Keywords: eyebrow tattoo before and after eyebrow tattoo hair stroke eyebrow tattoo procedure eyebrow tattoo gone wrong eyebrow tattoo tutorial eyebrow tattoo no removal eyebrow tattoo feathering eyebrow tattoo healing process eyebrow tattoo 3d eyebrow tattoo aftercare best eyebrow tattoo eyebrow tattoo korea korean eyebrow tattoo temporary eyebrow tattoo semi permanent eyebrow tattoo manual eyebrow tattoo ✉ ATTENTION BRANDS/COMPANIES ✉ If you are a company interested in collaborating with me free to email business@wengie.com

AFFORDABLE AIRCONDITIONING AND HEATING UNITS IN MARICOPA

AFFORDABLE AIRCONDITIONING AND HEATING UNITS IN MARICOPA

CALL US @ (520)406-1726. TO GET A FREE ESTIMATE AND A 10% DISCOUNT ON ANY INSTALLATION WHEN YOU MENTION THIS VIDEO.. YOU'VE FOUND THIS VIDEO BECAUSE YOU WERE ONLINE SEARCHING FOR AIRCONDITIONING AND HEATING OR FURNACE SYSTEMS NEAR YOUR AREA. LET ME TELL YOU, YOU'VE FOUND EXACTLY WHAT YOU NEED. IF WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR IS A FREE ANALYSIS, AND A FREE ESTIMATE WE'VE GOT IT. WE'RE ALSO GOING TO GIVE YOU TIPS AND STRATEGIES ON HOW TO SAVE MONEY ON YOUR ELECTRICITY OR GAS BILL, PLUS IF YOU MENTION THIS VIDEOS WE'RE GOING TO GIVE YOU A 10% DISCOUNT ON YOUR INSTALLATION. ALSO RECEIVE ANYWHERE FROM $100 TO $200 CASH WHEN YOU TELL US OF SOMEONE ELSE WHO NEEDS AN HEATER, FURNACE OR AIRCONDITIONING SYSTEM OR UNIT INSTALLATION ANYWHERE IN THE STATE OF ARIZONA. NOW PLEASE GIVE US A CALL AT (520)406-1726. THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME AND ATTENTION HAVE A BLESSED DAY.......................... Some motor homes have two furnaces and some have one. They should be located on one of the sides of the unit. In the shape of a medium sized rectangle. This compartment will also have a grill and it does stay hot. In order to open it up, remove the screws, remove the first door, and then there will be another one that just comes down as well. Then you will be at the control board located usually to the left of the compartment, you will also see your blower motor and your burner. First thing you want to do is check the connection on the control board and make sure there is no build up or corrosion. If there is you can take your canned air and clean it out, then just plug it back in and see if it works then. If it doesn't you want to go to your igniter and make sure it has a good connection and follow across and start checking all your connections and make sure they are all tight and secure. Blow air into your burner assembly to get all the buildup out. Then you want to test it again. If you hear a clicking noise it means that igniter is trying to light. If there is no clicking noise then more than likely you have a bad igniter or a bad board and you can pick up those parts and change them out yourself. If it is clicking and not lighting you need to take it in and have it looked at by a rv furnance repair maintenance motorhomes air conditioner heater parts motor home diy do it yourself furnace repairs, gas furnace repair, furnace maintenance, central air conditioning systems, split system air conditioning, portable air conditioning units, portable air conditioning unit, industrial air conditioning, american standard air conditioning, heating and air conditioning unit, heating and air conditioning units, central air conditioning prices, air conditioning installers, installing central air conditioning, gas furnace maintenance, air condition units, hvac company residential heating systems furnace installer, furnace contractor , furnace contractors, heating systems repair, heat contractor heating system repair buy furnace, central furnace, gas furnace prices, trane repair, ruud furnace, home heating systems furnace service day and night heater furnace maintenance inexpensive heating units trane HVAC heat pump efficiency, payne air conditioner, ruud air conditioners, air condition units, air condition carrier, mini split dual zone ductless central air conditioning, air conditioner maintenance, air conditioning filters, air conditioner manufacturers, air conditioning troubleshooting, american standard heat pumps, best air conditioner, mitsubishi air conditioner, air conditioning maintenance, ruud air conditioning, central air conditioner price, daikin air conditioner, ductless split systems, 12 volt air conditioner, mitsubishi air conditioners, hvac unit,mini split system, air conditioner price, american standard heat pump, coleman air conditioning, mitsubishi air condition, repair heat pump, coleman air conditioner, coleman air conditioners, air conditioning compressors, computer room air conditioning, mitsubishi air conditioning, daikin air conditioners, install air conditioner, air conditioner reviews, central air conditioning system, industrial air conditioning, ac compressors, heat pump system, air conditioning ducts, ductless heat pump, refrigeration, air conditioning

2014 Ford F-150 4WD SuperCrew 5-1/2 Ft Box FX4

2014 Ford F-150 4WD SuperCrew 5-1/2 Ft Box FX4

http://www.randallnoeusedcars.com/ 2014 Ford F-150 4WD SuperCrew 5-1/2 Ft Box FX4 Stock Number: F3259A VIN: 1FTFW1ETXEFA12906 Randall Noe Supercenter Terrell, TX 800-223-1679 One Owner, New Car Trade In, Clean CARFAX, Non Smoker, 2014 F-150 FX4, Ford Certified, 4x4 4D SuperCrew, EcoBoost 3.5 Liter 6 Cylinder GTDi Dual Overhead Cam 24 Volt Twin Turbocharged, 6-Speed Automatic Electronic, 4WD, Oxford White, and Black Leather Bucket Seats. Features include: Equipment Group 401A (FX4 Series, FX Plus Package, Power Adjustable Pedals, Reverse Sensing System, Power Sliding Rear Window, Rearview Camera, Integrated trailer brake control). 3.5 Liter Ecoboost, 3.55 electronic lock rr axle, 7200# gvwr, HID Headlamps, FX Appearance Package, 20" Wheels and Kicker Subwoofer. Your quest for a gently used truck is over. This wonderful 2014 Ford F-150 has only had one previous owner, with a great track record and a long life ahead of it. It will take you where you need to go every time...all you have to do is steer! Ford Certified Pre-Owned means you not only get the reassurance of a 12Mo/12,000Mile Comprehensive Warranty, but also up to a 7-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Limited Warranty, a 172-point inspection/reconditioning, 24/7 roadside assistance, trip-interruption services, rental car benefits, and a complete CARFAX vehicle history report. For more information on this vehicle, please call us at 800-223-1679. http://www.randallnoeusedcars.com/

Suspense: 'Til the Day I Die / Statement of Employee Henry Wilson / Three Times Murder

Suspense: 'Til the Day I Die / Statement of Employee Henry Wilson / Three Times Murder

The aim for thrillers is to keep the audience alert and on the edge of their seats. The protagonist in these films is set against a problem -- an escape, a mission, or a mystery. No matter what sub-genre a thriller film falls into, it will emphasize the danger that the protagonist faces. The tension with the main problem is built on throughout the film and leads to a highly stressful climax. The cover-up of important information from the viewer, and fight and chase scenes are common methods in all of the thriller subgenres, although each subgenre has its own unique characteristics and methods.[8] A thriller provides the sudden rush of emotions, excitement, sense of suspense and exhilaration that drive the narrative, sometimes subtly with peaks and lulls, sometimes at a constant, breakneck pace thrills. In this genre, the objective is to deliver a story with sustained tension, surprise, and a constant sense of impending doom. It keeps the audience cliff-hanging at the "edge of their seats" as the plot builds towards a climax. Thrillers tend to be fast-moving, psychological, threatening, mysterious and at times involve larger-scale villainy such as espionage, terrorism and conspiracy. Thrillers may be defined by the primary mood that they elicit: fearful excitement. In short, if it "thrills", it is a thriller. As the introduction to a major anthology explains: " ...Thrillers provide such a rich literary feast. There are all kinds. The legal thriller, spy thriller, action-adventure thriller, medical thriller, police thriller, romantic thriller, historical thriller, political thriller, religious thriller, high-tech thriller, military thriller. The list goes on and on, with new variations constantly being invented. In fact, this openness to expansion is one of the genre's most enduring characteristics. But what gives the variety of thrillers a common ground is the intensity of emotions they create, particularly those of apprehension and exhilaration, of excitement and breathlessness, all designed to generate that all-important thrill. By definition, if a thriller doesn't thrill, it's not doing its job. " —James Patterson, June 2006, "Introduction," Thriller[9] Writer Vladimir Nabokov, in his lectures at Cornell University, said: "In an Anglo-Saxon thriller, the villain is generally punished, and the strong silent man generally wins the weak babbling girl, but there is no governmental law in Western countries to ban a story that does not comply with a fond tradition, so that we always hope that the wicked but romantic fellow will escape scot-free and the good but dull chap will be finally snubbed by the moody heroine." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_thriller

Suspense: Mortmain / Quiet Desperation / Smiley

Suspense: Mortmain / Quiet Desperation / Smiley

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Calling All Cars: Disappearing Scar / Cinder Dick / The Man Who Lost His Face

Calling All Cars: Disappearing Scar / Cinder Dick / The Man Who Lost His Face

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Suspense: Man Who Couldn't Lose / Dateline Lisbon / The Merry Widow

Suspense: Man Who Couldn't Lose / Dateline Lisbon / The Merry Widow

Suspense is a radio drama series broadcast from 1942 through 1962. One of the premier drama programs of the Golden Age of Radio, was subtitled "radio's outstanding theater of thrills" and focused on suspense thriller-type scripts, usually featuring leading Hollywood actors of the era. Approximately 945 episodes were broadcast during its long run, and more than 900 are extant. Suspense went through several major phases, characterized by different hosts, sponsors, and director/producers. Formula plot devices were followed for all but a handful of episodes: the protagonist was usually a normal person suddenly dropped into a threatening or bizarre situation; solutions were "withheld until the last possible second"; and evildoers were usually punished in the end. In its early years, the program made only occasional forays into science fiction and fantasy. Notable exceptions include adaptations of Curt Siodmak's Donovan's Brain and H. P. Lovecraft's "The Dunwich Horror", but by the late 1950s, such material was regularly featured. The familiar opening phrase "tales well-calculated to..." was satirized by Mad as the cover blurb "Tales Calculated to Drive You... Mad" on its first issue (October--November 1952) and continuing until issue #23 (May 1955). Radio comedians Bob and Ray had a recurring routine lampooning the show, with stories that were presented as dramatic but were intentionally mundane, entitled "Tales calculated to put you in a state of... Apathy!" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Calling All Cars: Hot Bonds / The Chinese Puzzle / Meet Baron

Calling All Cars: Hot Bonds / The Chinese Puzzle / Meet Baron

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Calling All Cars: A Child Shall Lead Them / Weather Clear Track Fast / Day Stakeout

Calling All Cars: A Child Shall Lead Them / Weather Clear Track Fast / Day Stakeout

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Top Videa -  loading... Změnit krajinu
Načíst dalších 10 videí
 
 
Sorry, You can't play this video
00:00/00:00
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
CLOSE
CLOSE
CLOSE