A3J Vigilante Operations, USS Enterprise

A3J Vigilante Operations, USS Enterprise

The A3J Vigilante was one of the largest aircraft ever operated from the deck of an aircraft carrier, as shown in this footage taken on the USS Enterprise. This footage can be found on the rocket.aero DVD "Vigilante: A3J and RA-5C." For more information, visit www.rocket.aero

RA5C VIGILANTE AIRCRAFT Aboard the USS Ranger (silent film) VIETNAM ERA 80350

RA5C VIGILANTE AIRCRAFT Aboard the USS Ranger (silent film) VIETNAM ERA 80350

Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm USS Ranger CVA 61 RA-5C Vigilante 1964 Vietnam. The RA-5C was a Mach 2+ aircraft, capable of electromagnetic, optical, and electronic reconnaissance. It could operate at altitudes from sea level to above 50,000 feet. The Vigilante was employed to great effect by the 7th fleet during Carrier Air Wing operations in the Vietnam war. The two man crew flew in tandem in twin cockpits, the pilot in front, and the Reconnaissance Attack Navigator, in the rear This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

NORTH AMERICAN A3J VIGILANTE / A-5 AIRCRAFT PROMOTIONAL FILM 81234

NORTH AMERICAN A3J VIGILANTE / A-5 AIRCRAFT   PROMOTIONAL FILM 81234

Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This film V FOR VIGILANTE is a promotional piece made by North American Aviation to promote the “super sonic rifle”, the Navy's A3J fighter plane known as the A3J Vigilante (1:14). At the time the aircraft was being used as a nuclear weapon delivery platform. According to the film, the plane "contains some of the most advanced electronic equipment created by science" (1:42). The pilot and navigator could fly this plane over thousands of miles (1:56). Unlike missiles or unmanned crafts, this could be redirected to new targets while in flight (2:05). It is flown by television and radar and guided by devices enabling sight in the dark (2:21). The officers of the Bureau of Naval Weapons play a decisive role in choosing which crafts and equipment are used and will direct Aviation personnel to construct them (3:03). The Columbia division was chosen to construct the Vigilante (3:30). It will contain two turbo engines that enable movement faster than the speed of sound (3:55). After thourough plans have been drawn, a scale model is constructed (4:57). In the Columbus Division’s wind tunnel, jet streams will test the planes handling (5:31). The model is able to do everything a regular plane can, save for flight (5:38). Flight conditions are simulated by engineers and they seek ways to improve the craft (5:47). From here, the production of the Vigilante will commence (5:58). Miniscule components are machined (6:31) and in temperature controlled rooms, specific instruments are used for inspection (6:34). On the factory floor, the wings are crafted (6:54) as mechanics and Navy inspectors ensure proper construction (7:11). The craft is 73 feet long (7:35) and tail assembly rises twenty feet in the air (7:45). One unique feature is the linear rejection bomb bay (7:50). After construction, test engineers take over (7:56). In a steel rig, the craft will endure strenuous conditions (8:13). There will be many tests to follow such as how the pilot will save himself in emergency (9:30). After Columbus, it will head westward for the California desert to the North American test facility (10:29). The plane received international awards for flying seventeen miles above the stratosphere (11:04). As the Vigilante has now proven itself, it is sent to join the Fleet (11:34). The North American A-5 Vigilante is an American carrier-based supersonic bomber designed and built by North American Aviation for the United States Navy. Its service in the nuclear strike role to replace the Douglas A-3 Skywarrior was very short; however, as the RA-5C, it saw extensive service during the Vietnam War in the tactical strike reconnaissance role. Prior to the unification of the Navy designation sequence with the Air Force sequence in 1962, it was designated the A3J Vigilante. The Vigilante, designed and built for the U.S. Navy by North American Aircraft Division at Columbus, Ohio, was the only Mach 2 bomber to serve aboard a Navy carrier. Initially designated the A3J-1 attack bomber, it was one of the largest and heaviest aircraft ever accepted for service aboard U.S. Navy carriers. Production began in 1956, and it entered squadron service in June 1961. It was redesignated the A-5 and fully deployed by August 1962, when the USS Enterprise, the Navy’s first nuclear aircraft carrier, made its inaugural cruise. Changing defense strategies marked a change of focus away from carrier-based, heavy-attack squadrons. In 1964, all the Vigilantes were reconfigured as reconnaissance aircraft and designated RA-5C. Reconnaissance gear was mounted in what had been the Vigilante’s bomb bay. Other modifications allowed the RA-5C to carry four external fuel tanks. These additions increased the airplane’s range on reconnaissance missions and allowed it to keep its attack capability with externally mounted bombs and rockets. The RA-5C Vigilante first flew on June 30, 1962, and was capable of all-weather, long-range, carrier- or land-based, multisensor, reconnaissance missions involving high-altitude supersonic, or very low-altitude, high-speed penetrations. Its inertial navigation system provided the precise position location information demanded. The Vigilante pilot and the reconnaissance/attack navigator (RAN) sat in tandem under individual clamshell-type canopies. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

North American RA-5C Vigilante

North American RA-5C Vigilante

The Vigilante's early service proved troublesome, with many teething problems for its advanced systems. It also arrived in service during a major policy shift in the U.S. Navy's strategic role, which switched to emphasize submarine launched ballistic missiles rather than manned bombers. As a result, in 1963, procurement of the A-5 was ended and the type was converted to the fast reconnaissance role. The first RA-5Cs were delivered to the Replacement Air Group (RAG)/Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS), Reconnaissance Attack Squadron THREE (RVAH-3) at NAS Sanford, Florida in July 1963, with all Vigilante squadrons subsequently redesignated RVAH. Under the cognizance of Reconnaissance Attack Wing ONE, a total of 10 RA-5C squadrons were ultimately commissioned. RVAH-3 continued to be responsible for the stateside-based RA-5C training mission of both flight crews, maintenance and support personnel, while RVAH-1, RVAH-5, RVAH-6, RVAH-7, RVAH-9, RVAH-11, RVAH-12, RVAH-13 and RVAH-14 routinely deployed aboard Forrestal, Kitty Hawk, Enterprise, America, John F. Kennedy and eventually Nimitz-class aircraft carriers to the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Western Pacific. RA-5C Vigilante, BuNo 156608, from Reconnaissance Attack Squadron 7 (RVAH-7) during what may have been its final flight in 1979. This aircraft is now on permanent display at Naval Support Activity Mid-South (formerly NAS Memphis), TN. RA-5C Vigilante, BuNo 156608, from Reconnaissance Attack Squadron 7 (RVAH-7) during what may have been its final flight in 1979. This aircraft is now on permanent display at Naval Support Activity Mid-South (formerly NAS Memphis), TN. RVAH-11 USS Kitty Hawk 1968 RVAH-11 USS Kitty Hawk 1968 Eight of ten squadrons of RA-5C Vigilantes also saw extensive service in Vietnam starting in August 1964, carrying out hazardous medium-level reconnaissance missions. Although it proved fast and agile, 18 RA-5Cs were lost in combat: 14 to anti-aircraft fire, three to surface-to-air missiles, and one to a MiG-21 during Operation Linebacker II. Nine more were lost in operational accidents while serving with Task Force 77. Due, in part, to these combat losses, 36 additional RA-5C aircraft were built from 19681970 as attrition replacements. In 1968, Congress closed the aircraft's original operating base of NAS Sanford, Florida and transferred the parent wing, Reconnaissance Attack Wing ONE, all subordinate squadrons and all aircraft and personnel to Turner AFB, a Strategic Air Command (SAC) B-52 and KC-135 base in Albany, Georgia. The tenant SAC bomb wing was then deactivated and control of Turner AFB was transferred from the Air Force to the Navy with the installation renamed NAS Albany. In 1974, after barely six years of service as a naval air station, Congress opted to close NAS Albany as part of a post-Vietnam force reduction, transferring all RA-5C units and personnel to NAS Key West, Florida. Despite the Vigilante's useful service, it was expensive and complex to operate and occupied significant amounts of precious flight deck and hangar deck space aboard both conventional and nuclear-powered aircraft carriers. With the end of the Vietnam War, disestablishment of RVAH squadrons began in 1974, with the last Vigilante squadron, RVAH-7, completing its final deployment to the Western Pacific aboard USS Ranger (CV-61) in late 1979. Reconnaissance Attack Wing ONE was subsequently disestablished at NAS Key West, Florida in January 1980.

A-5 Vigilante ____(Rare Videos)

A-5 Vigilante ____(Rare Videos)

artist / song: Claudia Cazacu - Translucent (Paul Vernon Remix)

Aircraft Familiarization in the A3J Vigilante Operating Procedures

Aircraft Familiarization in the A3J Vigilante Operating Procedures

911 Unseen on TV (Age Restricted) 9/11 Plane Crashes World Trade Center Towers Sept 11

911 Unseen on TV (Age Restricted) 9/11 Plane Crashes World Trade Center Towers Sept 11

9/11 day unfolds in 18 minutes (Viewer Discretion Advised). For educational purposes only. Most footage never aired on TV or only on that day. First Plane Hit Top 911 Disturbing North Tower then South Tower Plane Crash, 9/11 Terrorist Attack, 911 people jumping from World Trade Center buildings, 9-11 Exploding Twin Towers, 9 11 Terror Twin Towers Collapse After Plane Collision Caught On Camera, Eye Witnesses WTC7 collapses in NYC on September 11th 2001. What collided into the pentagon? No Plane Crashed Into Building 7 on 9/11. This video includes copyrighted material "For purpose of criticism, education, news reporting" In accordance with: US Copyright Code - Title 17, Section 107 - Fair Use Clause The Berne Convention - Article 10 + 10bis The Berne Convention Implementation Act of 1988 Italian Copyright Code - Article 70 - L.633/41 This video represents solely the views of the author Use of copyrighted material does not imply endorsement by its owners 9/11 By The Naudet Brothers 9/11: Press for Truth News sources "How Can I Tell You" Cat Stevens

Aircraft Store Separation Incidents

Aircraft Store Separation Incidents

Aircraft Store Separation Incidents. When things come back to bite you in the ass!

9-11 WTC Attacks Original Sound. Steve Vigilante

9-11 WTC Attacks Original Sound. Steve Vigilante

Some footage I shot on 9-11-01. This is never before seen footage and has never been released. I chose to upload it because I feel it has historical importance. Like many New Yorkers I know some of the people who have passed and I know many people who have lost a loved one. Some of the footage is considered graphic as is some of the language. Unfortunately, this is a day I will never forget. May God Bless those who we lost on that terrible day.

NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION F-100C SUPER SABRE CRASH @ EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE BOB HOOVER 88804a

NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION  F-100C SUPER SABRE CRASH @ EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE  BOB HOOVER  88804a

This silent reel of footage comes from the North American Aviation film library and was used for company film productions in the 1960s. The film begins with footage of aircraft assembly and engineers working in the NAA factory. At :30 a spectacular accident is shown on the runway at Edwards AFB as an F-100 jet fighter flown by Lt. Barty R. Brooks crashes in a fireball. The details of this accident are described below. At 1:22 what might be the factory at Dallas, Texas is seen. At 1:29 the A-3 Vigilante is shown, probably the prototype aircraft. At 2:11 some of the company's WWII aircraft are briefly shown including the P-51 Mustang. The T-28 Trojan, a post-WWII trainer is also shown. At 6:35 the Thunderbirds are shown flying the F-100E Super Sabre jet. At 11:15 the Super Sabre F-100 is shown. At 12:00 schlieren effect is demonstrated. At 12:40 low passes are made by an F-100. At 16:14, expert pilot R.A. "Bob" Hoover demonstrates his famous flight routine in his trademark P-51 Mustang. When a swept wing starts to stall, the outermost portions tend to stall first. Since these portions are behind the center of lift, the overall lift force moves forward, pitching the nose of the aircraft upwards. This leads to a higher angle of attack and causes more of the wing to stall, which exacerbates the problem. The pilot often loses control, with fatal results at low altitude because there was insufficient time for the pilot to regain control or eject before hitting the ground. A large number of aircraft were lost to this phenomenon during landing, which left aircraft tumbling onto the runway, often in flames. One of the most notorious incidents was the loss of F-100C-20-NA Super Sabre 54-1907 and its pilot during an attempted emergency landing at Edwards AFB, California on January 10, 1956. By chance, this particular incident was recorded in detail on 16 mm film by cameras set up to cover an unrelated test. The pilot fought desperately to regain control due to faulty landing technique, finally rolling and yawing to the right before striking the ground with the fuselage turned approximately 90 degrees to the line of flight. The F-100 was noticeably underpowered for its day and had very pronounced "backside" tendencies if airspeed was allowed to decay too much. The brand new F-100C was flown by Lt. Barty R. Brooks, a native of Martha, Oklahoma and a Texas A&M graduate, of the 1708th Ferrying Wing, Detachment 12, Kelly AFB, Texas. The aircraft was one of three being delivered from North American's Palmdale plant to George AFB, California, but the nose gear pivot pin worked loose, allowing the wheel to swivel at random, so he diverted to Edwards, which had a longer runway. On approach, at a high angle of attack, the fighter exceeded its flight envelope, and, too far into stall condition, lost directional control with fatal results. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

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