Possibility Meaning

Possibility Meaning

Video shows what possibility means. The quality of being possible.. A thing possible; that which may take place or come into being.. An option or choice, usually used in context with future events.. possibility synonyms: option, choice, contingency, Wikisaurus:option. possibility pronunciation. How to pronounce, definition by Wiktionary dictionary. possibility meaning. Powered by MaryTTS

What is CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY? What does CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY mean?

What is CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY? What does CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY mean?

What is CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY? What does CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY mean? CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY meaning - CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY definition - CONDITION OF POSSIBILITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Condition of possibility is a philosophical concept made popular by Immanuel Kant. A condition of possibility is a necessary framework for the possible appearance of a given list of entities. It is often used in contrast to the unilateral causality concept, or even to the notion of interaction. For example, consider a cube made by an artisan. All cubes are three-dimensional. If an object is three-dimensional, then it is an extended object. But extension is an impossibility without space. Therefore, space is a condition of possibility because it is a necessary condition for the existence of cubes to be possible. Note, however, that space did not cause the cube, but that the artisan did, and that the cube and space are distinct entities, so space isn’t part of the definition of cube. Gilles Deleuze presented it as a dichotomy in contradistinction to the classical phenomenon/noumenon dichotomy. From Plato to Descartes, what was presented by the senses was deemed illusory and denigrated. It was believed that the perceptions ought to be overcome to grasp the thing-in-itself, the essential essence, also known as Plato’s allegory of the cave. With Kant comes a transition in philosophy from this dichotomy to the dichotomy of the apparition/conditions-of-appearance. There is no longer any higher essence behind the apparition. It is what it is, a brute fact, and what one must now examine is the conditions that are necessary for its appearance. Immanuel Kant does just this in the Transcendental Aesthetic, when he examines the necessary conditions for the synthetic a priori cognition of mathematics. But Kant was a transition, so he still maintains the phenomenon/noumenon dichotomy, but the noumenon has already been relegated unknowable and to be ignored. Foucault would come to adapt it in a historical sense through the concept of "episteme".

Possibility - Definition and How To Pronounce

Possibility - Definition and How To Pronounce

https://www.amazon.com/Merriam-Webster-Dictionary-New-2016/dp/087779295X?&_encoding=UTF8&tag=maturecolors2-20 possibility A thing that may happen or be the case. There may be risks in some forms of exchange, but the possibility of exchange is always present. How to pronounce possibility definition of possibility audio dictionary How to say possibility What is the meaning of possibility Pronounce possibility

What is EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY? What does EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY mean? EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY meaning

What is EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY? What does EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY mean? EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY meaning

What is EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY? What does EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY mean? EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY meaning - EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY definition - EPISTEMIC POSSIBILITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In philosophy and modal logic, epistemic possibility relates a statement under consideration to the current state of our knowledge about the actual world: a statement is said to be: - epistemically possible if it may be true, for all we know; - epistemically necessary if it is certain (or must be the case), given what we know; and - epistemically impossible if it cannot be true, given what we know. Epistemic possibility is often contrasted with subjunctive possibility (or alethic possibility), and although epistemic and subjunctive possibilities are often expressed using the same modal terms (such as possibly, could be, must be) or similar modal terms that are sometimes confused (such as may be and might be), statements that are qualified in terms of epistemic possibility and statements that are qualified in terms of subjunctive possibility have importantly different meanings. The contrast is best explained by example. Consider the two statements: 1. Hitler might have been victorious in World War II 2. Hitler may have been victorious in World War II Although these two statements are often confused with one another, they mean two different things: the first says something true about the vagaries of war; the second says something that is certainly false. The difference comes from the fact that the first statement—a statement of subjunctive possibility—says something about how things might have been under counterfactual conditions, whereas the second—a statement of epistemic possibility—says something about the relation between a particular outcome (a victory by Hitler) and our knowledge about the actual world (since, as it happens, we know perfectly well that that particular outcome did not actually obtain, we know that what it says is false). The parallel distinction arises between types of conditionals (if-then statements). Consider the difference between the epistemic connection expressed by an indicative conditional and the causal or metaphysical relation expressed by a subjunctive conditional: 1. If Oswald didn't shoot Kennedy, someone else did 2. If Oswald hadn't shot Kennedy, someone else would have The first statement says something that is certainly true, and will be accepted as such by anyone who is convinced that somebody shot Kennedy. It's clearly true because it expresses this epistemic relation between its antecedent (the "if"-clause) and its consequent (the "then"-clause): The antecedent, if we came to know it was true, would provide us with excellent evidence that the consequent is true. The second statement, on the other hand, expresses a causal or metaphysical relation: It says that the world was set up so that the consequent would have been made true if the antecedent were true. One will accept that second statement to the extent that one thinks the world was set up in that way. (Conspiracy theorists who think there was a back-up shooter, for instance, may accept the second statement.) Because of these differences, epistemic possibility bears on the actual world in ways that subjunctive possibility does not. Suppose, for example, that I want to know whether or not to take an umbrella before I leave. If you tell me "It's possible that it is raining outside"—in the sense of epistemic possibility—then that would weigh on whether or not I take the umbrella. But if you just tell me that "It's possible for it to rain outside"—in the sense of metaphysical possibility—then I am no better off for this bit of modal enlightenment.

The definition of possibility

The definition of possibility

What is possibility?

What is possibility?

At United Way Toronto, we talk a lot about possibility. Possibility for individuals. For families. For communities. For our entire city. But, in this video, we explore what you—people in the community—think. It all starts with a simple question: “What does possibility mean to you?”

Definition of the word "Possibility"

Definition of the word "Possibility"

On site https://abc-word.com/definition/possibility.html you will find full information about this word "possibility". From the video you will learn the definition for the word possibility. The lexical meaning of the word possibility. What does the word possibility mean? And much, much more... Did you like the video? Like this video and subscribe to the channel!!!

What is SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY? What does SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY mean?

What is SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY? What does SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY mean?

✪✪✪✪✪ http://www.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ What is SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY? What does SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY mean? SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY meaning - SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY definition - SUBJUNCTIVE POSSIBILITY explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Subjunctive possibility (also called alethic possibility) is the form of modality most frequently studied in modal logic. Subjunctive possibilities are the sorts of possibilities we consider when we conceive of counterfactual situations; subjunctive modalities are modalities that bear on whether a statement might have been or could be true—such as might, could, must, possibly, necessarily, contingently, essentially, accidentally, and so on. Subjunctive possibilities include logical possibility, metaphysical possibility, nomological possibility, and temporal possibility. Subjunctive possibility is contrasted with (among other things) epistemic possibility (which deals with how the world may be, for all we know) and deontic possibility (which deals with how the world ought to be). The contrast with epistemic possibility is especially important to draw, since in ordinary language the same phrases ("it's possible," "it can't be", "it must be") are often used to express either sort of possibility. But they are not the same. We do not know whether Goldbach's conjecture is true or not (no-one has come up with a proof yet); so it is (epistemically) possible that it is true and it is (epistemically) possible that it is false. But if it is, in fact, provably true (as it may be, for all we know), then it would have to be (subjunctively) necessarily true; what being provable means is that it would not be (logically) possible for it to be false. Similarly, it might not be at all (epistemically) possible that it is raining outside—we might know beyond a shadow of a doubt that it is not—but that would hardly mean that it is (subjunctively) impossible for it to rain outside. This point is also made by Norman Swartz and Raymond Bradley. There is some overlap in language between subjunctive possibilities and deontic possibilities: for example, we sometimes use the statement "You can/cannot do that" to express (i) what it is or is not subjunctively possible for you to do, and we sometimes use it to express (ii) what it would or would not be right for you to do. The two are less likely to be confused in ordinary language than subjunctive and epistemic possibility as there are some important differences in the logic of subjunctive modalities and deontic modalities. In particular, subjunctive necessity entails truth: if people logically must such and such, then you can infer that they actually do it. But in this non-ideal world, a deontic ‘must’ does not carry the moral certitude that people morally must do such and such. There are several different types of subjunctive modality, which can be classified as broader or more narrow than one another depending on how restrictive the rules for what counts as "possible" are. Some of the most commonly discussed are: 1. Logical possibility is usually considered the broadest sort of possibility; a proposition is said to be logically possible if there is no logical contradiction involved in its being true. "Dick Cheney is a bachelor" is logically possible, though in fact false; most philosophers have thought that statements like "If I flap my arms very hard, I will fly" are logically possible, although they are nomologically impossible. "Dick Cheney is a married bachelor," on the other hand, is logically impossible; anyone who is a bachelor is therefore not married, so this proposition is logically self-contradictory (though the sentence isn't, because it is logically possible for "bachelor" to mean "married man")....

What is Modality? (Definition)

What is Modality? (Definition)

In this video we examine the different varieties of modality (the ideas of possibility and necessity), including metaphysical (logical), nomic (natural or scientific), epistemic (doxastic), and deontic (moral or ethical). Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more! Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more!

What does possibility mean?

What does possibility mean?

What does possibility mean? A spoken definition of possibility. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/possibility

Top Videa -  loading... Změnit krajinu
Načíst dalších 10 videí
 
 
Sorry, You can't play this video
00:00/00:00
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
CLOSE
CLOSE
CLOSE