Do You Have Skin Cancer?

Do You Have Skin Cancer?

Are they freckles, sun spots, moles, or cancer? Dr. Mary Frances Pilcher, a dermatologist on the medical staff of Lee Health, says it can be difficult for patients to tell the difference. “It’s very hard to tell sun spots from melanoma, so that is the reason it’s important to come get checked.” Skin cancer can appear as spots that are raised, flat, white, or black. Doctors say if the spots become bigger, painful, or itch, it’s time to see your doctor. “It’s very important to also remember that you hear about melanoma, the brown black spots, but non melanoma skin cancer is far more common and those can actually look like pimples or bug bites,” said Dr. Pilcher. After age 30, patients should not develop new moles or spots that don’t go away. “Anything that’s been there, that’s new, that hasn’t gone away after about a month should be checked,” said Dr. Pilcher. Skin cancer is any kind of tumor that originates in the skin---and there are many different types. “Basal cell skin cancer typically does not spread. They can be locally aggressive. Squamous cell skin cancer, which is the second most common type of skin cancer, can spread to other parts of the body. It typically goes to the lymph nodes and lungs, and other places as well. Melanoma can go anywhere and it can be deadly,” said Dr. Pilcher. But if caught and diagnosed early, doctors say skin cancer is curable. “The risk is if you leave them too long. Most skin cancers that are the non-melanoma type can be cured simply by cutting them out. Melanoma if caught early can also be cured by cutting it out. It’s when they have sat there for a long time and they have had time to spread,” said Dr. Pilcher. About one in five people in the United States will develop some type of skin cancer in their life. It’s why doctors encourage anyone at any age getting screened for skin cancer. View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health - Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.org

Melanoma Rates Rising

Melanoma Rates Rising

New word from the CDC is that melanoma cancer is on the rise. The deadliest form of skin cancer doubled in the last 30 years. Survivability remained relatively the same. “For the most, melanoma is going to be picked up at an early stage because you can see it. You remove it, you’re done with it and most people are not going to require anything else,” says Dr. Frank Rodriguez, who is an oncologist on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Studies also find the majority of cases, between 70 and 80%, do not arise from an existing mole. Instead they appear in normal skin which suddenly develops a spot, thickening or uneven skin. Researchers believe these non-mole cancers may behave differently. “Every once in a while you’re going to find somebody who has either a very aggressive melanoma or didn't see the melanoma and the thing grew and was able to spread initially to the lymph nodes and eventually it can certainly spread to distant organs,” says Dr. Rodriguez. If doctors recognize and treat melanoma early, the cure rate is high. But untreated or aggressive forms present challenges. Recently, new lines of cancer drugs have shown great promise in advanced cases. “Oncology is really changing from using what we consider traditional chemo, which are agents that are geared toward just destroying cells in general, to finding out how we can target the bad cells better. And melanoma has proven to be particularly a good target,” says Dr. Rodriguez. To spot melanoma early, experts point to the ‘ABCDE method: look for asymmetrical or uneven borders, dual colors, large diameter and anything that evolves over time. The best medicine is staying on top of your skin and seeking medical help for any changes. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer - Mayo Clinic

The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer - Mayo Clinic

Richard W. Joseph, M.D., medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida talks about the most deadly form of skin cancer, known as melanoma. Here he explains the differences in the four stages of melanoma. View all of our "skin cancer" related videos at: http://bit.ly/SkinCancerVideos Dr. Joseph on twitter: http://twitter.com/RichardWJoseph

How to recognise if a mole is normal or suspicious

How to recognise if a mole is normal or suspicious

Dr Dean Eggitt explains how to recognise the difference between a healthy mole and a mole that looks suspicious. The Oakwood Surgery, Cantley, Doncaster www.theoakwoodsurgery.co.uk

Dr. Oz Explains Skin Cancer

Dr. Oz Explains Skin Cancer

What causes skin cancer? How do you detect it? How can I prevent it? Dr. Oz, Hugh Jackman, and a few expert dermatologists are here to answer all of your dire questions about Melanoma.

Skin Exams Catching Melanoma Earlier

Skin Exams Catching Melanoma Earlier

"Well, I have light skin, I was foolish out in the sun for many, many years," says James Haggerty. After several go-rounds with cancer, Haggerty is protective of his skin, both in the sun and at his doctor's office. "I use to see him once a year, but I now see them four times a year. Simply because I've had several skin cancers," says Haggerty. Studies show diligence pays off, in particular when it comes to melanoma, the most lethal form of skin cancer. Patients who had at least one skin exam were 37% less likely to have invasive disease if diagnosed with melanoma. A professional exam should be performed during an annual checkup. "You should get into a gown and the physician or nurse practitioner should be examining you in a gown so they can look at your skin look for melanomas. Skin cancer is actually the most common cancer and a lot of people really don't realize that. So you need that to be a part of your exam," says Dr. Sal Lacagnina, health and wellness with Lee Memorial Health System. Something as fundamental as looking for skin cancer is substantial in terms of survivability. In patients who had a skin exam in the last year, 64% of melanomas were Stage 0, meaning purely superficial, as compared to 46% of patients who had not undergone a skin exam. "Part of the examination should be a head to toe skin exam, including looking at your scalp, looking in between your fingers, in between the toes. I've had patients develop melanomas under the nail, behind the eye in the retina. So you know, you really need a good comprehensive exam," says Dr. Lacagnina. Haggerty battles the less serious squamous cell cancer, but given his complexion and sun history, he is always on the lookout. "You have to keep right on top of them, otherwise they will begin to become serious," says Haggerty. As more people get an early cancer diagnosis, it is making their prognosis, much brighter. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

Some Basal Cell Skin Cancers Aggressive

Some Basal Cell Skin Cancers Aggressive

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common of all skin cancers, and for most people, it is little more than a nuisance. "They have found different spots, mostly on my arms and on my back, from being out in the sun when I was younger," says Bob Davies. Davies has had several close encounters with basal cell. But he's always come away with a clean bill of health. Although it rarely metastasizes, the cancerous lesions can spread. "Although they have a very small risk of metastasizing, which means moving to another part of the body, they can get invasive. And they can get deeper and bigger," says Dr. Lowell Hart, oncologist and hematologist on Lee Memorial Health System's medical staff. The standard in care is to have a skin cancer treated by a dermatologist. Someone with an aggressive basal cell likely faces additional treatments; a more traditional protocol used to destroy cancerous tumors. "Sometimes radiation therapy can be of help because they tend to be sensitive to radiation. So the main stage of treatment for the early ones is surgical removal and sometimes the radiation therapy," says Dr. Hart. Basal cell also tends to be more disfiguring and problematic if it's left untreated for many years. Basal cell often appears as a waxy bump and is most common on the face, neck and arms. "People are living longer and the longer you live, you've had more time for these mutations and cancers to develop," says Dr. Hart. The take away Davies learned is by dealing with skin abnormalities when they are a small inconvenience, they're less likely to turn into a real pain. "It hurts a little tiny bit, like getting a needle. But it's very quick and very fast and it's the safe thing to do," says Davies. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

Signs and Symptoms of Skin Cancer

Signs and Symptoms of Skin Cancer

Signs and Symptoms of Skin Cancer by Zaineb Makhzoumi, MD

Skin Cancer Pictures | Pictures Of Skin Cancer Symptoms

Skin Cancer Pictures | Pictures Of Skin Cancer Symptoms

Skin Cancer Pictures - Skin Cancer Cure: https://goo.gl/k8vQMt In this video you'll find Different Types Of Skin Cancer Pictures with the signs and symptoms of skin cancer. One of the best ways to detect skin cancer early, and to prevent the spread of the cancer, is to take early skin cancer pictures and show them to a doctor. Photos, Images of Skin Cancer Signs, Symptoms. This video may help you in identifying skin conditions by showing you skin cancer pictures of: - actinic keratosis pictures http://www.premiumhealth.club/how-to-... - squamous cell carcinoma pictures - basal cell carcinoma pictures http://www.premiumhealth.club/how-to-... - melanoma pictures The skin cancer pictures in this video are for informative purposes only. Actinic keratosis, also called "solar keratosis" and "senile keratosis", is a pre-cancerous patch of thick, scaly, or crusty skin. These growths are more common in fair-skinned people, and those who are frequently in the sun. Actinic keratosis is considered to be potentially pre-cancerous. If it is left untreated, it may turn into a type of cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Basal cell carcinoma, also known as bazalioma, or basal cell cancer, is the most common skin cancer, and one of the most common cancers in the United States. While Basal cell carcinoma has a very low metastatic risk, this tumor can cause significant disfigurement by invading surrounding tissues. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells, that make up the middle and outer layer of the skin. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive in some cases. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can grow large, or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications. Melanoma, also known as malignant melanoma, is a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells. Melanomas typically occur in the skin, but may rarely occur in the mouth, intestines, or eye. Sometimes they develop from moles with concerning changes, including an increase in size, irregular edges, change in color, itchiness, or skin breakdown. Although symptoms may vary, new or unusual growths, or changes in already existing moles, can be signs of skin cancer. This video also contains images of skin cancer (melanoma) versus images of normal moles. Unfortunately, conventional doctors don't tell you the TRUTH, about skin cancer. They don't tell you, that there is a NATURAL SOLUTION FOR SKIN CANCER PREVENTION, and SKIN CANCER TREATMENT. Introducing a real skin cancer treatment breakthrough, the R47-PROTUMOL treatment cream. This patented skin cancer treatment cream helps to kill tumorous cells. This cream is not only very effective, but also 100% Side-Effect FREE. The effect of the cream is PROVEN by clinical trials. For More Information Visit. www.SkinCancerStop.org Skin cancer pictures - Photos images and pictures of skin cancer. These skin cancer signs and symptoms pictures are very useful for detection however The author of this video is NOT a medical professional. This video has NOT been reviewed by a medical professional. This video is intended for general academic purposes and is not intended as a health diagnostic tool. Related tags: Melanoma Pictures Pictures of Melanoma Images of Melanoma Photos of Melanoma Photos images and pictures of skin cancer early stage pictures of skin cancer melanoma skin cancer pictures pictures of skin cancer images of skin cancer photos of skin cancer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGYPzzlwlpM

Freckle, Mole or More? Making Sense of Skin Cancer

Freckle, Mole or More? Making Sense of Skin Cancer

A few blistering, lobster-red sunburns as a kid. Fair skin, light eyes, sprinkled with a hearty helping of freckles. A family history of melanoma.When it comes to protecting your skin from cancer, you can't be too safe. In this video, URMC dermatologist Dr. Marc Brown discusses skin cancer, the importance of practicing "safe sun," and some tips to help you identify suspicious moles at home. What's more, if you're in Rochester, NY, you can be proactive about your skin health this weekend by stopping by Strong Memorial Hospital's Free Skin Cancer Screening Clinic between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, May 7, 2011. For more information about the free detection clinic, contact the Dermatology Department at (585) 275-3871. The annual screening event is sponsored by the American Academy of Dermatology, Rochester Dermatologic Society, and URMC's Department of Dermatology.

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