Mandrage - Šrouby a matice (oficiální lyrics video)

Mandrage - Šrouby a matice (oficiální lyrics video)

Album "Moje krevní skupina" ke stažení na iTunes: http://bit.ly/MandrageMojeKrevniSkupina Oficiální videoklip ke zhlédnutí zde: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzi2vbGOJ7g

Upleťte si během pár minut copánky podle Kim Kardashian! Sledujte tenhle návod!

Upleťte si během pár minut copánky podle Kim Kardashian! Sledujte tenhle návod!

Kim Kardashian nic moc neumí, co si budem nalhávat. Ale zná ji celý svět a celý svět ji také následuje co se trendů týče. Dala nám konturování obličeje pomocí tuny mejkapu, dala nám trend velkých zadků a oteklých nohou na vysokých šteklých. A dala nám také účes - právě tyhle copánky, které jsou pro ni tak typické. Jak si je vytvořit na své hlavě? Sledujte náš jednoduchý návod!

ღ♥ّۣۜღ Pour toi mon Ange Jessy ღ♥ّۣۜღ HD

ღ♥ّۣۜღ Pour toi mon Ange Jessy ღ♥ّۣۜღ HD

Le 9 Juin 2004 .Mon Fils adorée tu est partit au Ciel chaque jour je dois luter pour continuer sans toi .Je t'aime tellement repose en Paix mon Ange tu me manques ♥ Robbie Williams Angels

Lucky Punch Sex drogy rock and roll

Lucky Punch  Sex drogy rock and roll

fire show Znojmo-Lucie OHEN

fire show Znojmo-Lucie OHEN

Návod na obrácený francouzský cop

Návod na obrácený francouzský cop

Jíšová DSCN0466

Jíšová  DSCN0466

P. Jíšová-Narozeninový koncert-ABC-

The Groucho Marx Show: American Television Quiz Show - Book / Chair / Clock Episodes

The Groucho Marx Show: American Television Quiz Show - Book / Chair / Clock Episodes

The interviews on the Groucho Show were sometimes so memorable that the contestants became celebrities. More Groucho: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=468d63b50bad56a2fb92f4f80b0d5aab&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=groucho "Nature boy" health advocate Robert Bootzin; hapless Mexican laborer Pedro Gonzalez-Gonzalez and his offhandedly comic remarks; a witty housewife named Phyllis Diller; author Ray Bradbury; virtuoso cellist Ennio Bolognini; blues singer and pianist Gladys Bentley; strongmen Jack LaLanne and Paul Anderson; actors John Barbour and Ronnie Schell all appeared as contestants while working on the fringes of the entertainment industry. Harland Sanders, who talked about his "finger-lickin'" recipe for fried chicken which he parlayed into the Kentucky Fried Chicken chain of restaurants, once appeared as a contestant. A guest purporting to be a wealthy Arabian prince was really writer William Peter Blatty; Groucho saw through the disguise, stating "You're no more a prince than I am because I have an Arabian horse and I know what they look like". Blatty won $10,000 and used the leave of absence the money afforded him to write The Exorcist. No one in the audience knew who contestant Daws Butler was until he began speaking in Huckleberry Hound's voice. He and his partner went on to win the top prize of $10,000. Cajun politician Dudley J. LeBlanc, a Louisiana state senator, demonstrated his winning style at giving campaign speeches in French. General Omar Bradley was teamed with an army private, and Marx goaded the private into telling Bradley everything that was wrong with the army. Professional wrestler Wild Red Berry admitted that the outcomes of matches were determined in advance, but that the injuries were real; he revealed a long list of injuries he had sustained. Other celebrities, already famous, occasionally teamed with their relatives to win money for charity. Arthur Godfrey's mother Kathryn was a contestant and held her own with Marx. Edgar Bergen and his then 11-year-old daughter Candice teamed up with Marx and his daughter Melinda to win $1,000 for the Girl Scouts of the USA; Fenneman played quizmaster for this segment. Ernie Kovacs, Hoot Gibson, Ray Corrigan, John Charles Thomas, Max Shulman, Sammy Cahn, Joe Louis, Bob Mathias, Johnny Weissmuller, Sam Coslow, Harry Ruby, Liberace, Lord Buckley, Don Drysdale, Tor Johnson, and Frankie Avalon also appeared on the program, among others. Harpo Marx appeared in 1961 to promote his just-published autobiography, Harpo Speaks. A much-recounted moment centers around a female contestant named Charlotte Story who had borne eleven children. Supposedly, when Marx asked why she had chosen to raise a large family, the contestant replied, "I love my husband", to which Marx responded with, "I love my cigar, but I take it out of my mouth once in a while!" According to the anecdote, the remark was judged too risqué to be aired, and was edited out before broadcast, but the audio of the audience's explosive laughter was used by NBC for years whenever a wild reception was called for in laugh tracks. No recorded outtake of the exchange exists, and both Marx and Fenneman denied the incident took place. Interviewed for Esquire in 1972, Marx flatly stated "I never said that." However, Hector Arce, Marx's ghost writer for his 1976 autobiography The Secret Word Is Groucho recounted the claim as fact, but Arce compiled the 1976 book from many other sources in addition to Marx himself, who was ailing then. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Groucho_Show

The Groucho Marx Show: American Television Quiz Show - Door / Food Episodes

The Groucho Marx Show: American Television Quiz Show - Door / Food Episodes

Contestant teams usually consisted of one male and one female, most selected from the studio audience. More Groucho: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=b5a9a56d226b935136eaa9cf963fea9b&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=groucho%20marx Occasionally, famous or otherwise interesting figures were invited to play (e.g., a Korean-American contestant who was a veteran and had been a prisoner of war during the Korean War). After his signature introduction of "Here he is: the one, the only..." by Fenneman and finished by a thunderous "GROUCHO!" from the audience, Marx would be introduced to the music of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding", his signature song. After which, Groucho would be introduced to the contestants and engage in humorous conversation for a lengthy period of time where Groucho both improvised his responses and employed prepared lines written by the show's writers using preshow interviews. Some show tension revolved around whether a contestant would say the "secret word", a common word revealed to the audience at the show's outset. If a contestant said the word, a toy duck resembling Groucho with a mustache and eyeglasses, and with a cigar in its bill, descended from the ceiling to bring a $100 bill. A cartoon of a duck with a cigar was also used in the opening title sequence. In one episode, Groucho's brother Harpo came down instead of the duck, and in another a model came down in a birdcage with the money. Marx sometimes slyly directed conversation to encourage the secret word to come up. The duck was also occasionally replaced with a wooden Indian figure. After the contestants' introduction and interview, the actual game began. Couples chose from a list of 20 available categories before the show, then tried to answer a series of questions within that category. From 1947--1956, couples were asked four questions. 1947--1953 -- Each couple began with $20, wagering part or all of their bankroll for each question. 1953--1954 -- Each couple now began with $0, but selected values from $10 to $100 (in $10 increments). A correct answer added the value of the question to their bankroll, while an incorrect answer did nothing. According to co-director Robert Dwan in his book As Long As They're Laughing, Guedel changed the scoring format because too many couples were betting, and losing, most or all of their money. 1954--1956 -- The format was slightly altered to start each couple with $100. Incorrect answers now cut their bankroll to that point in half. 1956--1959 -- Two couples (reduced from three) answered questions until they either gave two consecutive incorrect responses or answered four consecutive questions correctly for a prize of $1,000. 1959--1961 -- For the last two seasons, couples picked four questions worth $100, $200, or $300 each, potentially winning up to $1,200. Winning at least $500 qualified the team to go for the jackpot question. From 1947--1956, if the couple ended with $25 or less, Marx asked an elementary consolation question for a total of $25 (later $100) which did not count toward the scores. The questions were made easy in hopes that nobody would answer incorrectly, and included such examples as "Who is buried in Grant's Tomb?", "When did the War of 1812 start?", "How long do you cook a three-minute egg?", and "What color is an orange?" The question about Grant's Tomb became such a staple of the show that both Marx and Fenneman were shocked when one man got the question "wrong" by answering "No one". As the contestant then pointed out, Grant's Tomb is an above ground mausoleum. In all formats, one of the two players on the team could keep their half of the winnings while the other risked their half. In this case, all amounts being played for were divided in half. 1947--1956 -- The highest-scoring couple was given one final question for the jackpot, which began at $1,000 and increased by $500 each week until won (reaching $6,000 at least once, in 1952). In the event of a tie, the tied couples wrote their answers on paper and all couples who answered correctly split the jackpot. 1956--1957 -- For a brief period following the format change, couples who won the front game could wager half on another question worth $2,000. 1957--1959 -- Winning couples now faced a wheel with numbers from 1--10, selecting one number for $10,000. If the number selected was spun, a correct answer to the jackpot question augmented the team's total winnings to that amount; otherwise, the question was worth a total of $2,000. 1959--1961 -- For the last two seasons, the format was slightly altered to eliminate the risk and add a second number for $5,000. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho_Show

Laura - Lucie revival: Štastnej chlap

Laura - Lucie revival: Štastnej chlap

3.4.2014 ROCKOK

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