Physiology of Lipoproteins Cholesterol

Physiology of Lipoproteins Cholesterol

http://armandoh.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105 SPECIAL THANKS: Patreon members Artline Australia: http://www.artline.com.au/

LDL and HDL Cholesterol | Good and Bad Cholesterol | Nucleus Health

LDL and HDL Cholesterol | Good and Bad Cholesterol | Nucleus Health

Visit our website to learn about using Nucleus animations for patient engagement and content marketing: http://www.nucleushealth.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video-description&utm_campaign=ldl-hdl-041715 This 3D medical animation explains the differences between “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and their effects on the body. ANH15145

Non-fasting lipid profiles: implications for lipoprotein measurement and reporting

Non-fasting lipid profiles: implications for lipoprotein measurement and reporting

Version with interactive TOC is available on http://goo.gl/xnE2Dv. Presenter: prof. Michel Langlois MD, Ph.D. Professor Langlois is Professor at Ghent University, Department of Cardiovascular Diseases and Vice-Director at the laboratory of AZ St-Jan hospital, Bruges. He is currently the President of the Belgian Atherosclerosis Society, Past-president of the Royal Belgian Society of Laboratory Medicine. He is the Chair of the EFLM-EAS Task and Finish Group on Laboratory Testing for Dyslipidemia and member of the EFLM WG-Guidelines as well as corresponding member for the EFLM WG-Cardiac Markers and WG-Congresses and Postgraduate Education. Modrator: prof. Dr. Jerzy-Roch Nofer Fasting blood samples have been the standard for measurement of triglycerides and cholesterol, despite the fact that we spend the vast majority of our time in non-fasting conditions. However, when recent studies suggest that postprandial effects do not substantially alter lipid concentrations and do not weaken, and even may strengthen, their association with cardiovascular risk, then a non-fasting blood draw has many practical advantages. Non-fasting cholesterol measurements include the ‘remnant cholesterol’ fraction, a strong risk factor for developing atherosclerosis independent of LDL cholesterol. Remnant cholesterol reflects the cholesterol in chylomicron- and VLDL-remnant particles and it is included in the ‘non-HDL cholesterol’ calculation. Until recently, most guidelines focused on targeting primarily LDL cholesterol for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, but they now recognize that non-HDL cholesterol (or apolipoprotein B, the molecule carried by all non-HDL particles) is a more accurate and comprehensive predictor of atherogenic lipoprotein-related risk. In 2016, the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) and EFLM Joint Consensus Panel recommended using non-fasting lipid testing for routine clinical practice and provided specific cutpoints for desirable fasting and non-fasting lipid concentrations to be reported by the laboratories uniformly. EFLM webinar recorded at 7th June 2016.

Dr. Ronald Krauss on LDL Cholesterol, Particle Size, Heart Disease & Atherogenic Dyslipidemia

Dr. Ronald Krauss on LDL Cholesterol, Particle Size, Heart Disease & Atherogenic Dyslipidemia

Dr. Ronald Krauss, M.D. is the director of atherosclerosis research at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Adjunct Professor at UCSF and UC Berkeley. Dr. Krauss is really one of the pioneering scientists that changed the way we all think about cholesterol. He developed an assay that allows the quantification of low-density lipoprotein particle size and concentration (known to the wider world mostly as just "LDL cholesterol") based on a technique which determines the size of the particle based on physics...meaning the speed at which it flies through the air. This test which has not yet been fully adopted into all clinical practice in the manner that the total LDL cholesterol test has is known as the "ion mobility" test. In this episode, Rhonda and Ron discuss what HDL and LDL cholesterol are, what they do in the body, critical distinctions between the particle sizes of LDL and HDL, and how they play a role in heart disease. We talk about what small, dense LDL particles are, how they form, what effect eating saturated fat versus refined carbohydrates have on LDL particle size and heart disease risk and more generally what the main risk factors for heart disease are. Ron also talks about the good, bad and the ugly of LDL-lowering drugs known as statins, what the characteristics are of atherogenic dyslipidemia, riffs on the manner in which inflammatory cell wall components of bacteria, such as lipopolysaccharide, may interact with cholesterol to make it more harmful, and the effects of sugars on lipid production, and so much more. ▶︎ Get the show notes and transcript! https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/ronald-krauss ▶︎ Join my weekly newsletter: http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=nutrigenomics ▶︎ Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=foundmyfitness ▶︎ Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 ▶︎ Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/foundmyfitness

Lipoproteins: Good and Bad Cholesterol

Lipoproteins: Good and Bad Cholesterol

Learn all about Low-Density Lipoproteins (LDL), the so-called “bad” cholesterol, and High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) the “good” cholesterol. This video is just one of many that offers health and wellness tips at http://bit.ly/2j1jiqn Amy Wixted, Wellness and Education Manager at The Villages Health®, explains that lipoproteins are fat (lipids) on the inside, and proteins on the outside that capture cholesterol and carry it around our bodies. Cholesterol is a waxy, fatty substance and blood is a watery substance. Do oil and water mix? No. So lipoproteins act as messengers by carrying the cholesterol to other parts of the body. Think of them as like little sausages, the doggy treats. The waxy, fatty cholesterol is in the middle, and is surrounded by protein on the outside. There are two types of lipoproteins: Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL). The majority of cholesterol, about 2/3 to 3/4 of your total cholesterol in your body, is made up of LDL or your bad cholesterol. Your LDL carries cholesterol out to different cells of your body (including arteries that supply blood to the heart and brain). But having too much of it can cause plaque build-up and complications like heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and amputations, so you don’t want high levels of it. When you think of LDL, the L should stand for low. You also have High-Density Lipoproteins, or HDL. This is your good cholesterol, and the one you want to be as high as possible. That’s what the H is for. Your HDL carries cholesterol away; taking it back to the liver where it is processed and removed from your body. Like a vacuum cleaner, it pulls the cholesterol out and removes it. About 1/4 to 1/3 of your total cholesterol is made up of HDL, and having high levels of it is protective. Learn more about cholesterol: http://bit.ly/2nDo7cd Disclaimer: This content is for entertainment purposes only and it is not meant to be relied on as medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Consult your physician before starting any exercise or dietary program or taking any other action respecting your health. In case of a medical emergency, call 911. Subscribe to the Evergreen Wellness channel now: https://www.youtube.com/c/MyEvergreenWellness?sub_confirmation=1 Socialize with us. It’s good for you! https://www.facebook.com/MyEvergreenWellness/ https://twitter.com/evergreentoday https://www.linkedin.com/company/evergreen-wellness/ https://www.pinterest.com/evergreenwellne/ https://www.instagram.com/evergreenwellness/ https://plus.google.com/+Myevergreenwellness

Essential Lab Tests for Every Practice

Essential Lab Tests for Every Practice

This seminar includes an overview and nutritional support recommendations for CBC/differential, metabolic panel, lipid panel, thyroid panel/thyroid antibodies, urinalysis, PSA, and common markers for inflammation and insulin resistance disorders. Salivary tests for adrenal stress hormones and food intolerance testing will also be discussed.

Heart Health : What Is the Normal Range for Cholesterol?

Heart Health : What Is the Normal Range for Cholesterol?

The normal range for cholesterol is less than 200 total cholesterol, with less than 150 levels of triglycerides, greater than 40 HDL levels and less than 130 LDL levels. Find out the difference between good cholesterol and bad cholesterol with information from a board-certified cardiologist in this free video on heart health.

3 Genes That Give People Superpowers

3 Genes That Give People Superpowers

There are genetic mutations in the population today that can grant people some seemingly superhuman abilities. To get your 23andMe kit, go to: https://www.23andme.com/SciShow Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin, Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Sultan Alkhulaifi, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Piya Shedden, Charles George ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: MSTN - stronger muscles https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/the-man-of-steel-myostatin-and-super-strength/ http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa040933#t=article https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/MSTN#normalfunction https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1498/ http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1984-82502012000300003 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1113/expphysiol.2012.065243/asset/eph1073.pdf?v=1&t=j1mbvm9e&s=cc218db59ef9337ad4c1baecfb2b099fc4bef4ed https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1698719/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177043/ ACTN3 - fast-twitch muscles https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17289854 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/89 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26429734/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26148057 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0150594 https://www.wired.com/2008/11/the-actn3-sports-gene-test-what-can-it-really-tell-you/ http://muscle.ucsd.edu/musintro/fiber.shtml https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1180686/ http://jap.physiology.org/content/116/9/1197 LRP5 - stronger bones https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/LRP5#conditions http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa013444#t=article http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002929707605941 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S8756328205000165 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1359/jbmr.2003.18.6.960/full https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1815739 http://www.jbc.org/content/281/50/38276 http://oregonstate.edu/dept/biochem/hhmi/hhmiclasses/biochem/lectnoteskga/jan29.html http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0063323 ---------- Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MyostatinMutantWhippet.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Protein_ACTN3_PDB_1tjt.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:General_pathology;_from_the_11th_rev._German_ed._(1921)_(14578295997).jpg

Rethinking 'Good' Cholesterol; PSA Test Debate

Rethinking 'Good' Cholesterol; PSA Test Debate

This is the VOA Special English Health Report, from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish A study has raised questions about a widely held belief involving cholesterol. The belief is that high levels of so-called good cholesterol in the blood can reduce the risk of a heart attack. The medical name for "good" cholesterol is high-density lipoprotein, or HDL. Doctors commonly believe it reduces the risk of heart attack by removing fatty deposits that can block the flow of blood in the arteries of the heart. But Dr. Sekar Kathiresan at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston says the effects of high HDL have never been proven. He says the new study that he and other researchers did suggests that HDL cholesterol does not affect the risk of heart attack. He thinks the study has now broken "the major assumption over the last thirty years, that if you raise HDL cholesterol, the risk for heart disease will be lowered."The researchers say about four percent of people have a genetic variant, a change, that gives them a naturally high level of HDL. The study found that those who were genetically "programmed" to have higher HDL levels were just as likely to suffer heart attacks as those who were not. A second analysis looked at fourteen gene variants that increase good cholesterol. Dr. Kathiresan says people with the most variants had no more protection against heart attacks than anyone else. But he says there is no dispute about low-density lipoprotein, or LDL. LDL, the so-called bad cholesterol, causes a buildup of fatty substances inside arteries and increases the risk of heart attack. The findings appear in the Lancet medical journal. Another widely held medical belief has also come into question recently. For years, men over the age of forty have been told to get a simple blood test to see if they have prostate cancer. Now, experts on a government committee are advising them not to. Dr. Virginia Moyer heads the United States Preventive Services Task Force. She says, "Close to two-thirds of older men have prostate cancer and yet the huge majority of them never have a problem from it in their lifetime." The task force examined two large studies before deciding that treating the cancer found by the PSA test can do more harm than good. Effects of the treatment can include a loss of sexual ability and bladder control, as well as other problems including heart attacks. Some doctors support the findings of the task force, but others disagree. Urologist Deepak Kapoor says in about twenty years of PSA testing, death rates for prostate cancer have dropped by thirty-eight percent. For VOA Special English, I'm Carolyn Presutti. (Adapted from a radio program broadcast 06Jun2012)

Predicting heart attacks: researchers develops potential blood test

Predicting heart attacks: researchers develops potential blood test

DOWNLOAD HERE: http://newsdirect.nma.com.tw/SingleItem.aspx?asset_id=OEM_20120322_OINT_003 Every year numerous patients visit their doctors complaining of chest pain and are sent home because they pass the stress test, only to suffer a heart attack days later. Researchers from Scripps Translational Science Institute found that normally, circulating endothelial cells (CEC) line the inside of the coronary artery. However, days before heart attacks, the artery is inflamed. CEC cells deform, and eventually fall off to enter the bloodstream. Source: Heart Wire, Fox, LA Times

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