Watch Kailash Satyarthi's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech

Watch Kailash Satyarthi's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech

Children's rights advocate Kailash Satyarthi said every child deserves to dream in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech on Dec. 10, 2014. Watch an excerpt. Read more: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/malala-yousafzai-and-kailash-satyarthi-honor-forgotten-children/

Kailash Satyarthi 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Concert Speech

Kailash Satyarthi 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Concert Speech

Watch the 2014 Nobel Peace Price winner give his inspiring speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Concert in Oslo, Norway.

Reporters: Kailash Satyarthi is on a mission to end child slavery in India

Reporters: Kailash Satyarthi is on a mission to end child slavery in India

Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN A child disappears every eight minutes in India. In the capital New Delhi, six out of 10 children who go missing are never found. They are called the "lost generation": More than 200,000 children are still missing. It is estimated that 70% of them are kidnapped by gangs who then exploit them. Kailash Satyarthi, 64, and his teams are often their only hope. Over the past four decades the Nobel Peace Prize laureate has saved 87,000 children from a life of slavery. Between January 2012 and March 2017, the Indian authorities registered 250,000 children as missing. But according to activists, this figure represents only the tip of the iceberg – in many cases, families do not go to the authorities because they were fooled by "recruiters" who promised to send their children away to study. Local police officers also lack training in dealing with kidnappings and coordination between the different law enforcement agencies across the vast country is insufficient. This scourge is nothing new in India. Back in 1981, Kailash Satyarthi, an engineer by training, decided to organise his first operation: a raid on a textile workshop exploiting children. He decided to dedicate his life to the cause, earning a Nobel peace prize in 2014, an award he shared with girls' education activist Malala Yousafzai. Today Satyarthi leads several NGOs, including Bachpan Bacho Andolan (BBA), which allowed us to film one of its raids from start to finish. It was a rare opportunity. Reuniting families These operations, carefully planned in cooperation with the police, are not without risk. Several members of Satyarthi's team have already been killed during the raids or have faced reprisals from gangs. The raid we filmed led to the release of 42 children. None of our team will forget the children’s faces when we entered the workshop. Some of them had not seen the light of day for weeks and were forced to work up to 16 hours a day. Once the children have been rescued, the authorities try to identify them and find their parents. This process can take several months or even years. In India, many people do not have identity papers and some poorer families do not have any photographs of their children. But for the past few months, the police have been experimenting with a new facial recognition application. It is already making a difference: After only four days of use in May, more than 3,000 children were reunited with their families. Thanks to this software, one of the children we filmed during the raid, 12-year-old Ali, was able to find his family in Bihar, one of the poorest regions of India. But some children will never find their families. Others, whose parents are too poor to look after them, prefer to leave them in the hands of the authorities or with charities. With them in mind, Satyarthi and his wife opened the Bal Ashram rehabilitation and training centre in Rajasthan 20 years ago. Its volunteers try to give confidence back to those who never thought they could make their voices heard in Indian society. http://www.france24.com/en/reporters Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en

The Price of Free

The Price of Free

Follow the thrilling story of Nobel Peace Laureate Kailash Satyarthi’s journey to liberate every child from slavery. THE PRICE OF FREE follows Satyarthi and his team of activists around the world on secret raid and rescue missions as they hunt for missing children and work to reunite them with their families. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize, US Documentary, Sundance 2018. To learn more visit https://bit.ly/2QJCTZz

Kailash Satyarthi, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient | Talks at Google

Kailash Satyarthi, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient | Talks at Google

Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi joins Google's Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt for a fireside chat about his life's work. Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi has been leading the global fight against child slavery for over three decades. As the founder of a grassroots nonprofit, Bachpan Bachao Andolan, or Save Childhood Movement, he has rescued more than 80,000 Indian children to date from various forms of exploitation from child labor to child trafficking. Kailash’s work has involved organizing almost weekly raid, rescue and recovery missions on workplaces that employ and enslave children. Since 2001, Satyarthi’s has risked his own life to rescue these children and has convinced families in more than 300 Indian villages to avoid sending their children to work, and instead putting them in school. Satyarthi’s has also managed to grab and retain the world’s attention on the problem. He organized the Global March Against Child Labor in the 1990s to raise awareness and free millions of children shackled in various forms of modern slavery. His activism was also instrumental in the adoption of Convention No. 182 by the International Labour Organization, a statute that's become a guideline for many governments on child labor. In 2014, he and Malala Yousafzai were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for “their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

Malala Yousafzai, Kailash Satyarthi Win Nobel Prize

Malala Yousafzai, Kailash Satyarthi Win Nobel Prize

Malala Yousafzai, the 17-year-old education campaigner, and Indian children's-rights activist Kailash Satyarthi were awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony in Oslo Wednesday. Photo: Getty Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy Visit the WSJ channel for more video: https://www.youtube.com/wsjdigitalnetwork More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://online.wsj.com/home-page Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjlive Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJLive Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Follow WSJ on Tumblr: http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/wall-street-journal Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi receive their Nobel Peace Prizes | Mashable

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi receive their Nobel Peace Prizes | Mashable

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi accepted a joint Nobel Peace Prize on Wednesday for their work with children, and called on international leaders to continue the fight for education for all. Both activists have been instrumental in working to protect children from slavery, and provide open access to education, while risking their own lives in the process. http://www.mashable.com LIKE us on FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/mashable.video FOLLOW us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/mashablevideo FOLLOW us on TUMBLR: http://mashable.tumblr.com FOLLOW our INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/mashable JOIN our circle on GOOGLE PLUS: http://plus.google.com/+Mashable Subscribe!: http://bit.ly/1ko5eNd Mashable is the leading independent news site for all things tech, social media, and internet culture. http://www.youtube.com/mashable

Kailash Satyarthi, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate - A Need for Action

Kailash Satyarthi, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate - A Need for Action

https://youtu.be/Wn_-IOAuQ6g

Talk to Al Jazeera - Kailash Satyarthi: Saving India's child slaves

Talk to Al Jazeera - Kailash Satyarthi: Saving India's child slaves

Talk to Al Jazeera - Kailash Satyarthi: Saving India's child slaves For his work he has endured beatings and has received death threats. For his efforts and courage, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 - along with Pakistani youth activist Malala Yousafzai. For the past 35 years, Indian rights activist Kailash Satyarthi has devoted himself to freeing children working under terrible conditions in his native India. "The notorious people who engage children in slavery, the slave masters and traffickers, are powerful people, they are like mafia. They are well-connected with the local police and authorities. They earn a lot of black money.... Human trafficking is the largest illicit tade in the world today.... They are powerful people so risks are always there. I lost two of my colleagues - one was shot dead, one was beaten to death. I have scars almost everywhere on my body.... But I accepted it as challenge. Each time when these people tried to kill me I realised that I am on the right path," he says. Satyarthi's contribution to freeing children from exploitation and abuse is enormous, rescuing more than 80,000 children from illegal and hazardous work across India. But child labour remains a serious issue across the world. According to the International Labor Organisation, there are currently 168 million children engaged in forced labour worldwide. Satyarthi says the Nobel Prize is a recognition and honour to those children, who are still deprived of their childhood. However, the main question remains: Can child slavery be eradicated? Nobel Peace laureate Kailash Satyarthi talks to Al Jazeera about his fight against child slavery and abuse, women's rights in India, and how to protect children across the world.At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts

Kailash Satyarthi, contra la explotación infantil

Kailash Satyarthi, contra la explotación infantil

Kailash Satyarthi es un luchador infatigable por los derechos de los niños en la India. El Premio Nobel de la Paz denuncia la grave explotación infantil e intenta cambiar la situación de miles de menores. "Decimos que somos un país desarrollado, pero si un solo niño tiene que trabajar como esclavo, cualquier progreso sólo vale la mitad", afirma.

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