How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman

How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman

At the heart of the Milky Way, there's a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close -- even light. We can't see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth -- until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Colleagues Defend Katie Bouman For Her Work Creating 1st Black Hole Image | TODAY

Colleagues Defend Katie Bouman For Her Work Creating 1st Black Hole Image | TODAY

Katie Bouman was praised this week for her contributions behind the groundbreaking photo of a black hole but internet trolls have questioned her credibility. NBC’s Jake Ward reports for TODAY. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY Colleagues Defend Katie Bouman For Her Work Creating 1st Black Hole Image | TODAY

How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman | TEDxBeaconStreet

How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman | TEDxBeaconStreet

To take a photo of a black hole, you'd need a telescope the size of a planet. That's not really feasible, but Katie Bouman and her team came up with an alternative solution involving complex algorithms and global cooperation. Check out this talk to learn about how we can see in the ultimate dark. Katie Bouman is a Ph.D. candidate in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), under the supervision of William T. Freeman. She previously received a B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI in 2011 and an S.M. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT, Cambridge, MA in 2013. The focus of Katie’s research is on using emerging computational methods to push the boundaries of interdisciplinary imaging. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Meet Dr. Katie Bouman, the 29-Year-Old Behind the Black Hole Image | NowThis

Meet Dr. Katie Bouman, the 29-Year-Old Behind the Black Hole Image | NowThis

Meet Dr. Katie Bouman, the scientist who made the first-ever image of a black hole possible. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe Dr. Katie Bouman and her team created an algorithm that sifted through data collected from 8 radio telescopes to help construct the first-ever image of a black hole. Bouman is a computational imaging expert. The 29-year-old designs algorithms to observe phenomena that are difficult or nearly impossible to measure. She began working on the algorithm that produced the black hole image when she was an MIT grad student 3 years ago, according to MIT Computer Science and AI Laboratory. She joined the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) team as one of 3 dozen computer scientists working to process telescope data from a supermassive black hole located in the middle of galaxy Messier 87, 55M light-years from Earth. Katie Bouman, Nov 2016: 'Getting this first picture will come down to an international team of scientists, an Earth-sized telescope and an algorithm that puts together the final picture.' The EHT project’s 8 telescopes are placed on 5 continents, effectively creating an Earth-sized computational telescope. But the data it collects is spare and marred by atmospheric disturbance. In a 2016 TEDTalk, Bouman compared creating an image from the telescopes to creating an image from a rotating disco ball that only had a few of its mirrors. EHT’s computer scientists were tasked with creating algorithms to fill the holes. Katie Bouman, TEDTalk, 2016: 'My role in helping to take the first image of a black hole is to design algorithms that find the most reasonable image that also fits the telescope measurements.' The EHT team split its imaging experts into 4 different teams who weren’t allowed to communicate, according to The Washington Post. The teams used their respective algorithms to analyze data that was collected over 10 days in April 2017. In the summer of 2018, the teams convened to share their images and found each team produced images with a similar ring of light around the shadow of the black hole. Katie Bouman, to Boston Globe' It was amazing to see that first ring, but it was even more unbelievable that we all produced the ring.' The ring surrounding the black hole is a collection of chaotic photons that didn’t get sucked into the black hole’s event horizon —the escape door out of the universe. The image was presented publicly on April 10, 2019. The black hole has 6.5 billion times the mass of our sun, and it is the first piece of direct visual evidence of black holes. It confirms part of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity and proves that the unseeable might not be so mysterious after all. #KatieBouman #BlackHole #Science #Scientist Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews @nowthisnews

Katie Bouman “Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope”

Katie Bouman “Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope”

Dr. Katie Bouman, who starts as assistant professor of computing and mathematical sciences at Caltech in June 2019, describes how the Event Horizon Telescope team captured the first-ever image of a black hole.

Scientists react to first image of a black hole

Scientists react to first image of a black hole

As the first ever picture of a black hole was revealed, we asked researchers what this breakthrough means for them and for science. Read more in Nature's news story: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01155-0 Presented by Davide Castelvecchi, featuring Heino Falcke, Luciano Rezzolla, Katie Bouman, Monika Moscibrodzka and Junhan Kim. #realblackhole #EHTblackhole

Meet the 29-year-old woman behind the first image of a black hole

Meet the 29-year-old woman behind the first image of a black hole

Katie Bouman was a postdoctoral student at MIT when she led a team that designed one of the algorithms that helped analyze data that led to the first image of a black hole. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/

Meet Katie Bouman, One of the Scientists That Helped Capture the First Black Hole Image

Meet Katie Bouman, One of the Scientists That Helped Capture the First Black Hole Image

29-year-old Katie Bouman, a computer scientist, led a team that helped capture and develop the first-ever image of a black hole. Her excitement celebrating the development process is absolutely heartwarming. ► Subscribe for more tech & culture videos: http://on.mash.to/subscribe ◄ MORE FROM MASHABLE ‌• Video - https://youtu.be/6ElleCub6uM ‌• Video - https://youtu.be/jAu1ZsTCA64 ‌• Video - https://youtu.be/W8T6fYt9-tA  Subscribe to Mashable: http://on.mash.to/subscribe  Best of playlist: https://on.mash.to/BestOf  MASHABLE ACROSS THE WEB  Mashable.com: http://on.mash.to/1hCcRpl  Facebook: http://on.mash.to/2lyOwmZ Twitter: http://on.mash.to/1Udp1kz Instagram: http://on.mash.to/1U6D40z Mashable is for superfans. We're not for the casually curious. Obsess with us. #katiebouman #blackhole #blackholepicture

Katie Bouman at TEDxBeaconStreet

Katie Bouman at TEDxBeaconStreet

Liberty Mutual employees spoke with thought leaders and innovators at TEDxBeaconStreet 2016.

La chercheuse Katie Bouman raconte comment son amour des images l'a menée jusqu'à celle du trou noir

La chercheuse Katie Bouman raconte comment son amour des images l'a menée jusqu'à celle du trou noir

Invitée à s'exprimer devant le Congrès américain le 16 mai, Katie Bouman est revenue sur la création de la photo du trou noir Powehi. La chercheuse avait mené le développement d'un algorithme ayant joué un rôle décisif dans la production de cette image historique. Ce qui ne lui avait pas épargné des attaques sexistes remettant en cause son apport au projet. Pour vous abonner à la chaîne YouTube de "L’Obs" : https://www.youtube.com/c/lobs Retrouver toute l’actualité, les reportages, les enquêtes, les opinions et les débats de "L’Obs" sur notre site : https://www.nouvelobs.com/ "L’Obs" est aussi sur Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/lenouvelobservateur/ sur Twitter: https://twitter.com/lobs et sur Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lobs/

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