Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

Professor Snyder teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in modern East European political history. He is the author and co-editor of several award-winning books. We talk with Professor Snyder about his most recent book, a critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller entitled Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin.

Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning | Timothy Snyder (2017)

Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning |  Timothy Snyder (2017)

Ecological panic and statelessness as factors in the Holocaust: “Holocaust studies have moved into memorial mode without having achieved satisfactory explanation,” says Yale Professor, Timothy Snyder. The renowned academic and public intellectual was speaking to an invited audience at University College Dublin. In his talk, he argued that “the memorial mode” is taking up the space needed for “explanatory work” on the Holocaust. This memorial mode, he said, has allowed us “to fall back into national modes of discussing the Holocaust because when one discusses memory one invariably discusses a national memory and almost always one's national memory”. According to Professor Snyder, there is data to back up this assertion. “The last time I looked, [which was a couple of years ago] well over 90 per cent of the conferences devoted to the Holocaust were not devoted to the Holocaust, but they were devoted to the memory of the Holocaust which is a quite different subject.” Using primary sources, particularly Jewish primary sources, the author of Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning, developed his arguments to explain the Holocaust. He recounted the events from 1933 – 1945 and explained how “ecological panic” and “the State” were key factors in the Holocaust. Following the lecture, Professor Snyder took part in a questions and answers session chaired by Professor Robert Gerwarth from the UCD School of History, University College Dublin. Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1997, where he was a British Marshall Scholar. Before joining the faculty at Yale in 2001, he held fellowships in Paris, Vienna, and Warsaw, and an Academy Scholarship at Harvard. He speaks five and reads ten European languages. UCD Twitter: http://twitter.com/ucddublin UCD Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universitycollegedublin UCD Instagram: http://instagram.com/ucddublin UCD Homepage: http://www.ucd.ie

Uncommon Knowledge: Part 1: Stephen Kotkin on Stalin’s Rise to Power

Uncommon Knowledge: Part 1: Stephen Kotkin on Stalin’s Rise to Power

Recorded on July 29, 2015 Part 1: Stalin was born in a small town in Georgia in which he was educated to become a priest. After succeeding in school and becoming a devout follower of the faith, Stalin left the priesthood and became a communist revolutionary. World War I and the revolutions of 1917 set the stage for Stalin and the Communists to take power in Russia.

Anne Applebaum, Author, "Iron Curtain"

Anne Applebaum, Author, "Iron Curtain"

Our guest is Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Applebaum. She discusses her new historical narrative, "Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956." Applebaum examines the effects of communist totalitarianism in East Germany, Poland and Hungary from the end of World War II to the uprisings of 1956 in the years following Stalin's death.

Stalin's World: Stephen Kotkin in Conversation with David Remnick

Stalin's World: Stephen Kotkin in Conversation with David Remnick

Pulitzer-prize winning journalist David Remnick, editor-in-chief, The New Yorker, interviews historian Stephen Kotkin about the first tome of his three-volume biography, "Stalin:Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928."

The Road to Unfreedom - Timothy Snyder

The Road to Unfreedom - Timothy Snyder

Global Empowerment Meeting (GEM18), April 17-18, 2018 Keynote Session: The Road to Unfreedom: How our Intuitive Sense of Us and Them Makes us Vulnerable to Tyranny The world seems to be in a path of de-democratization. But this is not the first bu the third time this happens. What can be learned from previous experiences? What are the connections between today’s authoritarianism and those of the past? Does democracy require shared factuality -a shared understanding of the facts of objective reality within epistemic communities - and is this now being challenged? Are these epistemic communities breaking down? If so, what are the fault lines of that breakdown? Are new technologies making us more vulnerable to psychological manipulation relative to the propaganda of previous decades? And how does this manipulation work? Speaker: Timothy Snyder, Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and Permanent Fellow at the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna

International History Workshop, "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning”

International History Workshop, "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning”

Timothy Snyder, Bird White Housum Professor of History, Yale University (Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism) spoke on "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning.” This event was co-sponsored by the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism and the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs.

Timothy Snyder - Nations, Empires, Unions: European Integration and Disintegration Since 1914

Timothy Snyder - Nations, Empires, Unions: European Integration and Disintegration Since 1914

Nations, Empires, Unions: European Integration and Disintegration Since 1914 - lecture by Timothy Snyder. Held at the House of Literature (Litteraturhuset), Oslo, Saturday 8 February 2014.

The fascist philosopher behind Vladimir Putin’s information warfare

The fascist philosopher behind Vladimir Putin’s information warfare

If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Yale University Professor Timothy Snyder gives a crash course in Ivan Ilyin's philosophy of fascism and explains why this worldview is so appealing to Putin: it defines freedom as knowing your set place in society, asserts that democracy is a ritual and not a reality, and maintains that there are no facts in the world. Perhaps the most fascinating part of this is how new technology—like Facebook—is turning old fascism into political warfare. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/timothy-snyder-the-fascist-philosopher-behind-vladimir-putins-russia Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Ivan Ilyin was a fascist philosopher of the '20s, '30s, and '40s, but he’s probably the most important example of how old ideas can be brought back in the 21st century or in a postmodern context. Ilyin had three very important ideas. The first was that social advancement was impossible because the political system, the social system, is like a body. So you’re a cell, you’re an embryo, you’re an organ, you have a place in this larger body, and freedom means knowing your place. That’s what freedom means. A second idea that he had is that democracy is a ritual. So we can vote, but we only vote in order to affirm our collective support for a leader. The leader is not legitimated by our votes or chosen by our votes, the voting is just a ritual by which we collectively, every couple of years, endorse a leader who has emerged from some other place, from some—in fascism, a leader is some kind of hero who emerges from fiction, who emerges from myth. The third idea Ilyin had, which is very useful, is that the factual world doesn’t count. It’s not real. Ilyin says that God created the world, but that was a mistake. The world was a kind of aborted process. The world is a horrifying thing because it’s full of this and that and the other thing, what we call facts, and those facts can’t be unified into some kind of larger whole so the world is actually horrifying, and those facts are disgusting and of no value whatsoever. So, if you were Vladimir Putin and you’re governing as the head of an oligarchical clan it’s very comfortable to be able to say, “Well, look, freedom consists in knowing your place in society. There’s no possibility for social advance.” If you’re Vladimir Putin and you don’t have serious democracy or you don’t want to have it, it’s very comfortable to do, as he, in fact, has done, it’s very comfortable to transform elections into a kind of ritual. And, likewise, if you can’t have the rule of law and if Russians are basically stuck in a certain place economically and politically, the idea that the world is not factual, that the world is just subjective, that it’s just a matter of this opinion, that opinion and the other opinion, is very comfortable. And Ilyin adds the even more comfortable conclusion that the only true thing is Russian nationalism. The only hope to bring the whole world together is that somehow Russia—which is an innocent victim of the rest of the world—will somehow restore itself in some totalitarian form and then bring order back to the world. So interestingly—it’s not the only thing which is going on—but interestingly these kinds of ideas help Mr. Putin as he consolidates a certain kind of authoritarianism by spectacle at home and also help him as he broadcasts it abroad. The fundamental way that Russia works in American politics is by transmitting the idea that’s nothing is real. So it’s true that the Russians did support Trump. It’s true that there were all kinds of very specific interventions in the election of 2016. But the fundamental idea is to take new technology and transmit this old idea that we can’t really trust ourselves, that there aren’t really facts out there in the world, that the only thing that really matters is our preferences, or really our biases, or really our hatreds.

Timothy Snyder - "What Can European History Teach Us About Trump’s America?"

Timothy Snyder - "What Can European History Teach Us About Trump’s America?"

This event talks about the historical realities of political ideology, and discuss the ramifications of the 2016 election. Professor Snyder is one of the leading experts on Eastern European history, and recently published a new book, Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning, winner of the MacMillan Center’s Gustav Ranis International Book Prize. Professor Snyder will discuss recent presidential election and the state of European and American political history. Sponsored by the Yale Political Union and the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies.

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