How to play - Can't buy me love - riff - the Beatles - guitar lessons

How to play - Can't buy me love - riff - the Beatles - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the riff to Can't buy me love by The Beatles on the guitar. For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com "Can't Buy Me Love" was recorded on 29 January 1964 at EMI's Pathe Marconi Studios in Paris, France,[9] where the Beatles were performing 18 days of concerts at the Olympia Theatre. At this time, EMI's West Germany branch, Odeon, insisted that the Beatles would not sell records in any significant numbers in Germany unless they were actually sung in the German language[10] and the Beatles reluctantly agreed to re-record the vocals to "She Loves You" and "I Want to Hold Your Hand" prior to them being released in Germany. George Martin travelled to Paris with a newly mastered rhythm track for what was to be "Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand" ("Come, Give Me your Hand"/"I Want to Hold your Hand"). "Sie Liebt Dich" ("She Loves You") required the Beatles to record a new rhythm track as the original two-track recording had been scrapped.[9] EMI sent a translator to be present for this recording session which had been hurriedly arranged to tie in with the Beatles Paris commitments. This was accomplished well within the allotted studio time allowing the Beatles an opportunity to record the backing track, with a guide vocal, to the recently composed "Can't Buy Me Love".[10][9] At this stage the song included background vocal harmonies. But after listening to the first take, the band concluded that the song did not need them. Therefore, "Can't Buy Me Love" became the first single the Beatles released without their characteristic background harmonies. McCartney's final vocal was overdubbed at EMI Studios, Abbey Road, London, on 25 February.[5] Also re-recorded on this day at EMI Studios was George Harrison's modified guitar solo, although his original solo can still just be heard in the background. Harrison said: "What happened was, we recorded first in Paris and re-recorded in England. Obviously they'd tried to overdub it, but in those days they only had two tracks, so you can hear the version we put on in London, and in the background you can hear a quieter one."[11] Helen Shapiro, a friend of the Beatles and present at this overdub session, says that Ringo Starr also added extra cymbals "over the top" and that "apparently this was something he did quite often on their records" [12] (Geoff Emerick, tape operator and later the Beatles' recording engineer, credits Norman Smith, the Beatles' then-current engineer, with this overdub)[13]. "Can't Buy Me Love" is also the only English-language Beatles track that the Beatles themselves recorded in a studio outside the UK, although the instrumental portion of the Beatles' B-side "The Inner Light" was recorded in India by Indian session musicians.

How to play - Radiohead - Street Spirit - riff - guitar lesson

How to play - Radiohead - Street Spirit - riff - guitar lesson

Learn how to play the riff to Radiohead's Street Spirit (Fade Out). For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com go to contact, drop me a line and we can sort a session. "Street Spirit (Fade Out)" (commonly referred to as "Street Spirit") is a song by English alternative rock band Radiohead, featured on their second studio album The Bends, which was released in 1995. Noted by singer-songwriter and guitarist Thom Yorke as "one of [the band's] saddest songs" and describing it as "the dark tunnel without the light at the end", "Street Spirit" was released as the band's ninth single and reached number five on the UK Singles Chart, the highest chart position the band achieved until "Paranoid Android" from OK Computer, which reached number three in 1997. Yorke has suggested that the song was inspired by the 1991 novel The Famished Road, written by Ben Okri, and that its music was inspired by R.E.M.[1] The track is built around a soft melody in A minor with an arpeggio (broken chord) guitar part. A previous, working title for the song was "Three Headed Street Spirit", as seen in interviews with Thom Yorke preceding the release of The Bends. [2] The single is also acclaimed for the quality of its B-sides; for example, "Talk Show Host" rose to prominence after it was remixed by Nellee Hooper for the 1996 film Romeo + Juliet, since becoming a regular at Radiohead concerts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_Spirit_(Fade_Out)

How to play - Jumping Jack Flash - intro - Rolling Stones - guitar lessons

How to play - Jumping Jack Flash - intro - Rolling Stones - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the intro to Jumping Jack Flash in Eb (flat) tuning! Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, recording on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" began during the Beggars Banquet sessions of 1968. Regarding the song's distinctive sound, guitarist Richards has said: I used a Gibson Hummingbird acoustic tuned to open D, six string. Open D or open E, which is the same thing -- same intervals -- but it would be slackened down some for D. Then there was a capo on it, to get that really tight sound. And there was another guitar over the top of that, but tuned to Nashville tuning. I learned that from somebody in George Jones' band in San Antonio in 1964. The high-strung guitar was an acoustic, too. Both acoustics were put through a Philips cassette recorder. Just jam the mic right in the guitar and play it back through an extension speaker.[4] Richards has stated that he and Jagger wrote the lyrics while staying at Richards' country house, where they were awoken one morning by the sound of gardener Jack Dyer walking past the window. When Jagger asked what the noise was, Richards responded: "Oh, that's Jack -- that's jumpin' Jack."[5] The rest of the lyrics evolved from there.[4][6] Humanities scholar Camille Paglia[7] speculated that the song's lyrics might have been partly inspired by William Blake's poem "The Mental Traveller": "She binds iron thorns around his head / And pierces both his hands and feet / And cuts his heart out of his side / To make it feel both cold & heat." Jagger said in a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone that the song arose "out of all the acid of Satanic Majesties. It's about having a hard time and getting out. Just a metaphor for getting out of all the acid things."[8] In his autobiography, Stone Alone, Bill Wyman has claimed that he came up with the song's distinctive main guitar riff on an organ without being credited for it.[4] On the studio version of the number, Jagger provided the lead vocals and maracas, Richards played acoustic guitars, electric bass guitar and the floor tom, Brian Jones played guitar and sang backing vocals, Charlie Watts was on drums and Bill Wyman was on organ. Nicky Hopkins contributed piano, and producer Jimmy Miller joined in on the backing vocals.

How to play - Everlong - Foo Fighters - verse - guitar lessons

How to play - Everlong - Foo Fighters - verse - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the verse to Everlong by Foo Fighters in drop D tuning on guitar! For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com go to contact, drop me a line and we can sort a session. "Everlong" is the second single released from Foo Fighters' second album The Colour and the Shape, released in 1997. The song was conceived when Dave Grohl returned home to Washington, D.C., following the initial recording sessions for the album. It was eventually recorded as part of the second set of sessions, which took place at Grandmaster Recorders in January--February 1997. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everlong

How to play - Jumpin' Jack Flash - chorus - Rolling Stones - guitar lessons

How to play - Jumpin' Jack Flash - chorus - Rolling Stones - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the chorus to Jumping Jack Flash in Eb (flat) tuning! For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com go to contact, drop me a line and we can sort a session. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, recording on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" began during the Beggars Banquet sessions of 1968. Regarding the song's distinctive sound, guitarist Richards has said: I used a Gibson Hummingbird acoustic tuned to open D, six string. Open D or open E, which is the same thing -- same intervals -- but it would be slackened down some for D. Then there was a capo on it, to get that really tight sound. And there was another guitar over the top of that, but tuned to Nashville tuning. I learned that from somebody in George Jones' band in San Antonio in 1964. The high-strung guitar was an acoustic, too. Both acoustics were put through a Philips cassette recorder. Just jam the mic right in the guitar and play it back through an extension speaker.[4] Richards has stated that he and Jagger wrote the lyrics while staying at Richards' country house, where they were awoken one morning by the sound of gardener Jack Dyer walking past the window. When Jagger asked what the noise was, Richards responded: "Oh, that's Jack -- that's jumpin' Jack."[5] The rest of the lyrics evolved from there.[4][6] Humanities scholar Camille Paglia[7] speculated that the song's lyrics might have been partly inspired by William Blake's poem "The Mental Traveller": "She binds iron thorns around his head / And pierces both his hands and feet / And cuts his heart out of his side / To make it feel both cold & heat." Jagger said in a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone that the song arose "out of all the acid of Satanic Majesties. It's about having a hard time and getting out. Just a metaphor for getting out of all the acid things."[8] In his autobiography, Stone Alone, Bill Wyman has claimed that he came up with the song's distinctive main guitar riff on an organ without being credited for it.[4] On the studio version of the number, Jagger provided the lead vocals and maracas, Richards played acoustic guitars, electric bass guitar and the floor tom, Brian Jones played guitar and sang backing vocals, Charlie Watts was on drums and Bill Wyman was on organ. Nicky Hopkins contributed piano, and producer Jimmy Miller joined in on the backing vocals. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumpin'_Jack_Flash

How to play - Jumpin' Jack Flash - verse - Rolling Stones - guitar lessons

How to play - Jumpin' Jack Flash - verse - Rolling Stones - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the verse to Jumping Jack Flash in Eb (flat) tuning! For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com go to contact, drop me a line and we can sort a session. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, recording on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" began during the Beggars Banquet sessions of 1968. Regarding the song's distinctive sound, guitarist Richards has said: I used a Gibson Hummingbird acoustic tuned to open D, six string. Open D or open E, which is the same thing -- same intervals -- but it would be slackened down some for D. Then there was a capo on it, to get that really tight sound. And there was another guitar over the top of that, but tuned to Nashville tuning. I learned that from somebody in George Jones' band in San Antonio in 1964. The high-strung guitar was an acoustic, too. Both acoustics were put through a Philips cassette recorder. Just jam the mic right in the guitar and play it back through an extension speaker.[4] Richards has stated that he and Jagger wrote the lyrics while staying at Richards' country house, where they were awoken one morning by the sound of gardener Jack Dyer walking past the window. When Jagger asked what the noise was, Richards responded: "Oh, that's Jack -- that's jumpin' Jack."[5] The rest of the lyrics evolved from there.[4][6] Humanities scholar Camille Paglia[7] speculated that the song's lyrics might have been partly inspired by William Blake's poem "The Mental Traveller": "She binds iron thorns around his head / And pierces both his hands and feet / And cuts his heart out of his side / To make it feel both cold & heat." Jagger said in a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone that the song arose "out of all the acid of Satanic Majesties. It's about having a hard time and getting out. Just a metaphor for getting out of all the acid things."[8] In his autobiography, Stone Alone, Bill Wyman has claimed that he came up with the song's distinctive main guitar riff on an organ without being credited for it.[4] On the studio version of the number, Jagger provided the lead vocals and maracas, Richards played acoustic guitars, electric bass guitar and the floor tom, Brian Jones played guitar and sang backing vocals, Charlie Watts was on drums and Bill Wyman was on organ. Nicky Hopkins contributed piano, and producer Jimmy Miller joined in on the backing vocals.

How to play - The Pretender - Foo Fighters - verse - guitar lessons

How to play - The Pretender - Foo Fighters - verse - guitar lessons

Learn how how to play the verse from The Pretender by the Foo Fighters on guitar! For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com go to contact, drop me a line and we can sort a session. Dave Grohl first showcased the song, which had the working title "Silver Heart", during pre-production of Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, but the song did not see much development. According to producer Gil Norton, "The chorus was there, but the verse and the middle hadn't been written. Not to mention the song was much slower." During a ten day break from recordings in April 2007, Grohl listened to the the monitor mixes and thought that the record needed another uptempo song, so he spent his time developing "Silver Heart". The band then recorded a demo for "The Pretender", which Norton approved, leading to the song getting a proper recording the following day.[4] Grohl described "The Pretender" as "a stomping Foo Fighters uptempo song, with a little bit of Chuck Berry in it."[5] The song showcases the shifting dynamics which Grohl wanted to employ on Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, starting with a very stripped-down introduction, featuring Grohl on guitar and vocals along with a small string section. Then comes an escalating hard rock sound, interrupted by breakdowns and escalations in the bridge, including a repeat of the intro. Mixing engineer Rich Costey stated that making all these dynamics work, as well as balancing the instruments, as Grohl and drummer Taylor Hawkins always want more focus on their instruments. The amount of guitar overdubs also worried Costey - "The guitars on 'The Pretender' are quite full on, with countermelodies and so forth, and they all tend to be in the same range, so it gets quite dense. The challenge of this type of mix is to retain the power of the track, yet define a space for everything. Handling the guitar balance was a slight chore, and in comparison the drums and vocals were quite easy."[6] [edit]Meaning In a 2007 interview with XFM, frontman Dave Grohl stopped short of explaining the meaning behind "The Pretender", but alluded its roots go to current political unrest. Grohl noted, "That's the thing with lyrics, you never want to give away specifics, because it's nice for people to have their own idea or interpretation of the song. But, you know, everyone's been fucked over before and I think a lot of people feel fucked over right now and they're not getting what they were promised, and so something to do with that."[7] Grohl also told XFM "The Pretender" was not initially planned for the album and happened really quickly. "That song didn't happen until later on in the session. We didn't go into making the record with that song and it happened after we recorded a lot of stuff. Up until that point, I didn't know if we had a good opening song or not. So after we recorded it, I thought, 'oh this is perfect, we have the song to open the record,' and it just became everybody's favorite song. ... It's the type of song that I look forward to opening shows with and it came together really easily. We put that song together in, I don't know, a day, whereas a lot of the other songs we worked on for weeks."

How to play - Everlong - Foo Fighters - chorus - guitar lessons

How to play - Everlong - Foo Fighters - chorus - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the chorus to Everlong by Foo Fighters in drop D tuning on guitar! "Everlong" is the second single released from Foo Fighters' second album The Colour and the Shape, released in 1997. The song was conceived when Dave Grohl returned home to Washington, D.C., following the initial recording sessions for the album. It was eventually recorded as part of the second set of sessions, which took place at Grandmaster Recorders in January--February 1997. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everlong

How to play Wonderwall - by Oasis - chorus

How to play  Wonderwall  - by Oasis - chorus

Learn how to play the chorus section to Wonderwall by Oasis in full HD. This video is brought to you by http://www.rockeveryday.com/. Rock Every Day strives to bring you the best rock guitar lessons to be found online. Coming soon and bringing you the likes of Foo Fighters, U2, Led Zeppellin, Radiohead, Rolling Stones, R.E.M, the Beatles and much more! For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com go to contact, drop me a line and we can sort a session. "Wonderwall" was written for Gallagher's then-girlfriend, Meg Matthews,[3] as Gallagher told NME in 1996, "It's about my girlfriend, Meg Matthews."[4] However, after Gallagher divorced Matthews in 2001,[5] he said the song was not about Matthews: "[the song was] about an imaginary friend who's gonna come and save you from yourself."[1] [edit]Recording and composition The song was recorded at Rockfield Studios in Wales, during a two-week recording of the Morning Glory album in May 1995. Owen Morris produced the song in a half-day along with Noel Gallagher using a technique known as "brickwalling" to intensify the sound of the song.[6] Liam served as lead singer on "Wonderwall" after Noel had given him a choice between "Wonderwall" or another single from the album, "Don't Look Back in Anger".[4] "Wonderwall" is written in the key of F# Minor and is set in common time with a moderate dance groove.[7] Liam Gallagher's voice ranges from an E3 to an F#4[7] Learn more about the song at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonderwall_(song) We are happy to take requests for rock songs you want to learn so leave a comment with your request! Enjoy!!!

How to play - Everlong - Foo Fighters - bridge - guitar lessons

How to play - Everlong - Foo Fighters - bridge - guitar lessons

Learn how to play the bridge to Everlong by Foo Fighters in drop D tuning on guitar! For a Skype lesson with me, go to http://www.halifaxguitarschool.com "Everlong" is the second single released from Foo Fighters' second album The Colour and the Shape, released in 1997. The song was conceived when Dave Grohl returned home to Washington, D.C., following the initial recording sessions for the album. It was eventually recorded as part of the second set of sessions, which took place at Grandmaster Recorders in January--February 1997. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everlong

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