Eritrea's External Relations

Eritrea's External Relations

Since the conclusion of the conflict between Eritrea and Ethiopia in 2000, the Government of Eritrea has become increasingly isolated, militarized and, many would argue, misunderstood on the world stage. A focal point for violent insecurity across the region, Eritrea is vital to the stability of the east and northeast Africa and beyond. Eritrea's relationship with the West is complicated, although it has developed relations with the United States on the latter's on-going war with terrorism. Eritrea's relations with its neighbors have been stained from a series of conflicts and disputes. On Friday, January 22, 2009, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted a book discussion on “Eritrea's External Relations: Understanding Its Regional Role and Foreign Policy.” Presented by book editor Richard Reid from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and discussant Bereket Habte Selassie, Department of African Studies, University of North Carolina and moderated by Steve McDonald, Consulting Director for the Africa Program and Leadership Project. This publication represents the first significant analysis of Eritrea's international relations and the internal and regional dynamics which lie behind them, by bringing together the insights of several international analyst and scholars.

Pakistani Public Opinion Towards Terrorism

Pakistani Public Opinion Towards Terrorism

Christine Fair, Assistant Professor, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Pakistan's Current Challenges: A Discussion With Najam Sethi

Pakistan's Current Challenges: A Discussion With Najam Sethi

Najam Sethi is the editor-in-chief of Pakistan's Daily Times and Friday Times newspapers. One of Pakistan's best-known journalists, his reporting has frequently put him at odds with successive governments as well as with extremist religious groups. He was recently awarded the 2009 Golden Pen of Freedom, the annual freedom prize of the World Association of Newspapers. He also received an International Press Freedom award from the Committee to Protect Journalists in 1999.

Russian Military Capabilities

Russian Military Capabilities

Moles, Defectors, and Deceptions: James Angleton and His Influence on US Counterintelligence

Moles, Defectors, and Deceptions: James Angleton and His Influence on US Counterintelligence

A Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and Georgetown University Center for Peace & Security Studies joint conference.

The Elephant at Sea: India's Maritime Strategy

The Elephant at Sea: India's Maritime Strategy

Asia Program In the next decade, India plans to introduce 40 new warships and 400 new aircraft to its naval forces. Such efforts reflect a dramatic maritime transformation now underway in India—one meant to improve India's power projection capabilities at sea and to produce a blue-water navy. On March 9, the Asia Program, with co-sponsorship from International Security Studies, hosted an event on India's maritime strategy and growing maritime power. Event Speakers: Arun Prakash Siddarth Srivastava Andrew C. Winner

The Philippines, Vietnam, and Territorial Disputes in the South China Sea

The Philippines, Vietnam, and Territorial Disputes in the South China Sea

As Beijing continues to trumpet its “New Type of Great Power Relationship” with the United States, and the United States attempts to buttress its “Rebalance to Asia”, Asia-Pacific nations keep a close eye on relations between the two giants. http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/the-philippines-vietnam-and-territorial-disputes-the-south-china-sea New questions about China’s intentions and America’s commitments in the region seem to arise every week of late. Tensions are flaring over the Philippines’ arrest of Chinese poachers in its exclusive economic zone, over Chinese reconstruction of a reef in the Spratley Islands, and over Chinese drilling near the disputed Paracel Islands and the protests that ensued in Hanoi. Dr. Aileen Baviera of the University of the Philippines and Dr. Hoang Anh Tuan of the Institute for Foreign Policy and Strategic Studies of the Diplomatic Academy of Vietnam discussed their respective countries’ interests in the region and their perspectives on Sino-U.S. cooperation and competition in Asia-Pacific. This event was part of the Wilson Center’s Weighing the Rebalance Series, a joint effort of the Asia Program and the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States. This three-year series brings regional experts to Washington to analyze Chinese and American roles in Asia-Pacific from the viewpoints of countries affected by Sino-U.S. competition and cooperation. The Series will conclude with a multilateral conference and publication of policy-briefs for policymakers in Washington and Beijing.

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

Ishmael Beah, author of A Long Way Gone Memoirs of a Boy Soldier At age 12 he was a normal, music-loving boy. Two years later he was a bitter war veteran who had killed more people than he could count. Ishmael Beah was also one of more than 300,000 child soldiers worldwide who have been forced into the world's most savage wars. In this program Beah describes his ordeal and the rehabilitation that saved his life.

"Putin's Kleptocracy - Who Owns Russia?"

"Putin's Kleptocracy - Who Owns Russia?"

Former Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar, Karen Dawisha, will present her new book "Putin's Kleptocracy: Who Owns Russia?" with Elizabeth A. Wood joining her as a discussant. The book traces Putin's sudden rise to power and examines the network of individuals who rose to power and riches along with him. Dawisha’s provocative new study further addresses the nature of Putin’s power vertical and the endemic corruption that accompanies his system.

Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country

Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country

Though the United States and Canada are the world's largest trading partners, internal politics and long wait times at the shared border have hurt both trade and tourism. With Asian economies on the rise, noted Canadian journalist Diane Francis argues that the United States and Canada should merge to become an economic superpower-- one with unparalleled access to natural resources. In her book, Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country, Francis lays out her plan for a future union, providing strong arguments and citing impending social, political, and natural crises as reasons to do so.

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