RV Furnace Repair Not Igniting Service

RV Furnace Repair Not Igniting Service

http://www.rvfourseasons.com Colorado's 1st Choice RV Dealer in New and Used Travel Trailers for Sale! Save time and money... when you shop for that special part or the latest and greatest camping toy, you'll discover we have more than 230,000 RV Parts and RV Accessories available at the touch of your finger tips. Need help in ordering those hard to find parts? Call or stop by today and we will place a special order for you! Of course, we can deliver to your RV's front door within a day or two for your convenience. • Over 228,000 Parts • 12 fulfillment warehouses in North America • 2-day standard shipping. Discover the best… outdoor adventure options in Travel Trailers, Fifth Wheels, Toy Haulers, and Motorhomes. We are one of the largest RV dealers in the Tri-State area for Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. Start creating memories of a lifetime today and check out our Weekly BLOW OUT SALE and Managers Specials”. Call or stop by any 1 of our 3 locations in NA today! Don’t miss out… Subscribe to our must watch videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RVFourSeasonsCO Stay connected… Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rvfourseasons Twitter https://twitter.com/RVFourSeasons Pinterest http://www.pinterest.com/rvfourseasons/boards/ Most important factor… when investing in an RV or what we like to call an "outdoor adventure home" is; the guaranteed quality service that comes after the sale. This is what put us on the map in 1962 and made us #1 in the RV industry. Need a Facelift for your RV? We have one of the largest paint booths in the region, equipped with state of the art color matching and color mixing systems. Our paint and body professionals can give your RV the look it needs. Let one of our skilled detail specialist bring out the original paint color and take the oxidation away with an exterior detail. Why risk your safety? Our family of trained specialists and expert technicians have been safely caring for and maintaining motor homes and RV trailers in the RV community since 1962. Get the most longevity out of your investment and adventure home by calling our friendly and dependable service professionals today! Big or small we service them all. Discover why… we have the recreational vehicle community as a whole, coming in from 350 miles away to receive our first class treatment. Come see for yourself, what our 30,000 happy customers are talking about. FREE credit check to qualify today! • Fast, easy, hassle-free financing • Lowest ever interest rates! • Lock in your interest rate today • Safe secure application and approval process online Full service RV dealer… RV Four Seasons is committed to creating memories of a lifetime and a community of explorers who depend on their adventure home to get them where they want to go in peace of mind. ====== Kids and Dogs are always welcome! ====== ***3 Locations to serve you*** 900 E Hwy 402 Loveland, CO. 80537 970-342-2000 4100 Youngfield St. Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 303-422-2001 Box 968 Trans-Canada Hwy #1 Virden, Manitoba, MB ROM 2C0 888-934-4444 -- RV Four Seasons -- 4 seasons RV -- Four Seasons RV -- RV 4 Seasons --

2018 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Winter Haven, Lakeland, Kissimmee, Davenport, Haines City, FL 18700

2018 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Winter Haven, Lakeland, Kissimmee, Davenport, Haines City, FL 18700

White 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid available in Winter Haven, Florida at Red Hoagland Hyundai. Servicing the Lakeland, Kissimmee, Davenport, Haines City, FL area. Used: http://www.redhoagland.com/VehicleSearchResults?search=preowned New: http://www.redhoagland.com/VehicleSearchResults?search=new&make=Hyundai 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Limited - Stock#: 18700 - VIN#: KMHC05LC5JU088680 http://www.redhoagland.com For more information on this vehicle and our full inventory, call us at 877-512-2811 Red Hoagland Hyundai 6375 Cypress Gardens Blvd Winter Haven FL 33884 Guaranteed low price on any new in stock Hyundai. Number One in customer satisfaction for all Hyundai Dealerships in Florida, No Games, No Gimmicks You've found the one you've been looking for. Your dream car. The look is unmistakably Hyundai, the smooth contours and cutting-edge technology of this Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Limited will definitely turn heads. Look no further, you have found exactly what you've been looking for. The Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Limited will provide you with everything you have always wanted in a car -- Quality, Reliability, and Character. Our prices include all available rebates. Not all customers will qualify for every incentive. Please call us and we will happily provide the details Window Grid Antenna,6 Speakers,Radio: 7 Touch-Screen Display Audio -inc: hybrid technology display, AM/FM/MP3 audio system w/iPod/USB/Auxiliary input jacks, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration for compatible smartphones, integrated Bluetooth hands-free phone system w/phonebook transfer, SiriusXM satellite radio w/90-day trial, HD radio, Blue Link connected car services and Blue Link connected care and remote package for 3 years SiriusXM NOT AVAILABLE in AK/HI.,Radio w/Seek-Scan, Clock, Speed Compensated Volume Control, Steering Wheel Controls and Voice Activation,2 LCD Monitors In The Front,Perimeter/Approach Lights,Front Windshield -inc: Sun Visor Strip,Chrome Door Handles,Fully Automatic Projector Beam High Intensity Low/High Beam Daytime Running Lights Preference Setting Headlamps w/Delay-Off,Fully Galvanized Steel Panels,Body-Colored Front Bumper w/Black Rub Strip/Fascia Accent,Lip Spoiler,Variable Intermittent Wipers,Tires: 225/45R17,Spare Tire Mobility Kit,Clearcoat Paint,Chrome Side Windows Trim,Body-Colored Power Heated Side Mirrors w/Manual Folding and Turn Signal Indicator,Gray Bodyside Moldings,Body-Colored Rear Bumper w/Black Rub Strip/Fascia Accent,Light Tinted Glass,Liftgate Rear Cargo Access,LED Brakelights,Wheels: 17 Eco-spoke Alloy,Express Open/Close Sliding And Tilting Glass 1st Row Sunroof w/Sunshade,Metal-Look Grille,Fixed Rear Window w/Defroster,6-Way Passenger Seat -inc: Manual Recline, Height Adjustment and Fore/Aft Movement,HVAC -inc: Underseat Ducts,Cargo Area Concealed Storage,60-40 Folding Split-Bench Front Facing Fold Forward Seatback Rear Seat,Cargo Features -inc: Spare Tire Mobility Kit,Seats w/Leatherette Back Material,Remote Releases -Inc: Proximity Cargo Access and Mechanical Fuel,Manual Adjustable Front Head Restraints and Manual Adjustable Rear Head Restraints,Fade-To-Off Interior Lighting,2 12V DC Power Outlets,Driver Foot Rest,Leather/Metal-Look Steering Wheel,Leather Seating Surfaces,Rear Cupholder,Full Carpet Floor Covering,Leatherette Door Trim Insert,Power Rear Windows,Digital/Analog Display,Trip Computer,Full Cloth Headliner,Instrument Panel Covered Bin, Driver / Passenger And Rear Door Bins,Engine Immobilizer,Compass,Carpet Floor Trim,Outside Temp Gauge,Heated Front Bucket Seats -inc: power driver's seat w/lumbar support,Delayed Accessory Power,Power 1st Row Windows w/Driver And Passenger 1-Touch Up/Down,Gauges -inc: Speedometer, Odometer, Engine Coolant Temp, Tachometer, Traction Battery Level, Power/Regen, Trip Odometer and Trip Computer,Cargo Space Lights,Front Cupholder,Proximity Key For Doors And Push Button Start,HomeLink Garage Door Transmitter,Perimeter Alarm,Leather/Metal-Look Gear Shift Knob,Power Door Locks w/Autolock Feature,Dual Zone Front Automatic Air Conditioning,Front Center Armrest w/Storage and Rear Center Armrest,Glove Box,Day-Night Auto-Dimming Rearview Mirror,FOB Controls -inc: Trunk/Hatch/Tailgate and Remote Engine Start,Interior Trim -inc: Piano Black Console Insert and Chrome/Metal-Look Interior Accents,Full Floor Console w/Covered Storage, Mini Overhead Console w/Storage and 2 12V DC Power Outlets,Air Filtration,Manual Tilt/Telescoping Steering Column,Driver And Passenger Visor Vanity Mirrors w/Driver And Passenger Illumination, Driver And Passenger Auxiliary Mirror,Front Map Lights,Cruise Control w/Steering Wheel Controls,1 Seatback Storage Pocket,Remote Keyless Entry w/Integrated Key Transmitter, Illuminated Entry, Illuminated Ignition Switch and Panic Button,Strut Front Suspension w/Coil Springs,Gas-Pressurized Shock Absorbers,Regenerative 4-Wheel Disc Brakes w/4-Wheel ABS, Front Vented Discs, Brake Assist and Hill Hold Control,Front-Wheel Drive,Front Anti-Roll Bar,Lithiu

Suspense: Man Who Couldn't Lose / Dateline Lisbon / The Merry Widow

Suspense: Man Who Couldn't Lose / Dateline Lisbon / The Merry Widow

Suspense is a radio drama series broadcast from 1942 through 1962. One of the premier drama programs of the Golden Age of Radio, was subtitled "radio's outstanding theater of thrills" and focused on suspense thriller-type scripts, usually featuring leading Hollywood actors of the era. Approximately 945 episodes were broadcast during its long run, and more than 900 are extant. Suspense went through several major phases, characterized by different hosts, sponsors, and director/producers. Formula plot devices were followed for all but a handful of episodes: the protagonist was usually a normal person suddenly dropped into a threatening or bizarre situation; solutions were "withheld until the last possible second"; and evildoers were usually punished in the end. In its early years, the program made only occasional forays into science fiction and fantasy. Notable exceptions include adaptations of Curt Siodmak's Donovan's Brain and H. P. Lovecraft's "The Dunwich Horror", but by the late 1950s, such material was regularly featured. The familiar opening phrase "tales well-calculated to..." was satirized by Mad as the cover blurb "Tales Calculated to Drive You... Mad" on its first issue (October--November 1952) and continuing until issue #23 (May 1955). Radio comedians Bob and Ray had a recurring routine lampooning the show, with stories that were presented as dramatic but were intentionally mundane, entitled "Tales calculated to put you in a state of... Apathy!" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Suspense: The High Wall / Too Many Smiths / Your Devoted Wife

Suspense: The High Wall / Too Many Smiths / Your Devoted Wife

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Suspense: 'Til the Day I Die / Statement of Employee Henry Wilson / Three Times Murder

Suspense: 'Til the Day I Die / Statement of Employee Henry Wilson / Three Times Murder

The aim for thrillers is to keep the audience alert and on the edge of their seats. The protagonist in these films is set against a problem -- an escape, a mission, or a mystery. No matter what sub-genre a thriller film falls into, it will emphasize the danger that the protagonist faces. The tension with the main problem is built on throughout the film and leads to a highly stressful climax. The cover-up of important information from the viewer, and fight and chase scenes are common methods in all of the thriller subgenres, although each subgenre has its own unique characteristics and methods.[8] A thriller provides the sudden rush of emotions, excitement, sense of suspense and exhilaration that drive the narrative, sometimes subtly with peaks and lulls, sometimes at a constant, breakneck pace thrills. In this genre, the objective is to deliver a story with sustained tension, surprise, and a constant sense of impending doom. It keeps the audience cliff-hanging at the "edge of their seats" as the plot builds towards a climax. Thrillers tend to be fast-moving, psychological, threatening, mysterious and at times involve larger-scale villainy such as espionage, terrorism and conspiracy. Thrillers may be defined by the primary mood that they elicit: fearful excitement. In short, if it "thrills", it is a thriller. As the introduction to a major anthology explains: " ...Thrillers provide such a rich literary feast. There are all kinds. The legal thriller, spy thriller, action-adventure thriller, medical thriller, police thriller, romantic thriller, historical thriller, political thriller, religious thriller, high-tech thriller, military thriller. The list goes on and on, with new variations constantly being invented. In fact, this openness to expansion is one of the genre's most enduring characteristics. But what gives the variety of thrillers a common ground is the intensity of emotions they create, particularly those of apprehension and exhilaration, of excitement and breathlessness, all designed to generate that all-important thrill. By definition, if a thriller doesn't thrill, it's not doing its job. " —James Patterson, June 2006, "Introduction," Thriller[9] Writer Vladimir Nabokov, in his lectures at Cornell University, said: "In an Anglo-Saxon thriller, the villain is generally punished, and the strong silent man generally wins the weak babbling girl, but there is no governmental law in Western countries to ban a story that does not comply with a fond tradition, so that we always hope that the wicked but romantic fellow will escape scot-free and the good but dull chap will be finally snubbed by the moody heroine." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_thriller

Suspense: Mortmain / Quiet Desperation / Smiley

Suspense: Mortmain / Quiet Desperation / Smiley

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Suspense: Murder Aboard the Alphabet / Double Ugly / Argyle Album

Suspense: Murder Aboard the Alphabet / Double Ugly / Argyle Album

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Calling All Cars: Banker Bandit / The Honor Complex / Desertion Leads to Murder

Calling All Cars: Banker Bandit / The Honor Complex / Desertion Leads to Murder

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

The Great Gildersleeve: Fishing Trip / The Golf Tournament / Planting a Tree

The Great Gildersleeve: Fishing Trip / The Golf Tournament / Planting a Tree

The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve

Calling All Cars: Ice House Murder / John Doe Number 71 / The Turk Burglars

Calling All Cars: Ice House Murder / John Doe Number 71 / The Turk Burglars

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

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