Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong | Johann Hari

Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong | Johann Hari

What really causes addiction — to everything from cocaine to smart-phones? And how can we overcome it? Johann Hari has seen our current methods fail firsthand, as he has watched loved ones struggle to manage their addictions. He started to wonder why we treat addicts the way we do — and if there might be a better way. As he shares in this deeply personal talk, his questions took him around the world, and unearthed some surprising and hopeful ways of thinking about an age-old problem. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

This Pulse CIA EMP cannon was built in 2010 by Army General Alex Melnikov and Military Engineer Alex Williams in San Francisco, CA. Tested by me Igor Kryan aka Alexander Williams. After tests we had to replace all cell phones, computers, light bulbs in the building. It can easily disable truck, tank or small building. In 2013 CIA agent Rostislav Kryzhanovsky and Navy Engineer James Garcia commissioned 100 times more powerful truck version of this energy weapon in Fresno, CA. The beauty of this top secret weapon that regular EMP bomb is blown only once and target everything inside its circle while this pulse EMP gun can be fired for precise selective targeting and can be used and re-used 1,000s times. The truck version can easily disable a large building, aircraft carrier or nuclear power plant. The reason I disclose this top secret is to make Americans aware that at least 2 of these truck sized devices are currently in hands of rogue CIA operatives who plan to use it against Americans for a new false flag attack next year and to blame Russians and start a new war against internal and external enemies.

Merced Chevrolet "Winter Clearance Sale!"

Merced Chevrolet "Winter Clearance Sale!"

Client: Merced Chevrolet Ad Agency: Atlantis Advertising Comcast Rep: Jim Eckman TV Broadcast Commercial for Comcast Cable TRT 00:30 Director/Editor: Matthew Gonzales Production Company: MattG Productions

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

This Pulse CIA EMP cannon was built in 2010 by Army General Alex Melnikov and Military Engineer Alex Williams in San Francisco, CA. Tested by me Igor Kryan aka Alexander Williams. After tests we had to replace all cell phones, computers, light bulbs in the building. It can easily disable truck, tank or small building. In 2013 CIA agent Rostislav Kryzhanovsky and Navy Engineer James Garcia commissioned 100 times more powerful truck version of this energy weapon in Fresno, CA. The beauty of this top secret weapon that regular EMP bomb is blown only once and target everything inside its circle while this pulse EMP gun can be fired for precise selective targeting and can be used and re-used 1,000s times. The truck version can easily disable a large building, aircraft carrier or nuclear power plant. The reason I disclose this top secret is to make Americans aware that at least 2 of these truck sized devices are currently in hands of rogue CIA operatives who plan to use it against Americans for a new false flag attack next year and to blame Russians and start a new war against internal and external enemies.

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

This Pulse CIA EMP cannon was built in 2010 by Army General Alex Melnikov and Military Engineer Alex Williams in San Francisco, CA. Tested by me Igor Kryan aka Alexander Williams. After tests we had to replace all cell phones, computers, light bulbs in the building. It can easily disable truck, tank or small building. In 2013 CIA agent Rostislav Kryzhanovsky and Navy Engineer James Garcia commissioned 100 times more powerful truck version of this energy weapon in Fresno, CA. The beauty of this top secret weapon that regular EMP bomb is blown only once and target everything inside its circle while this pulse EMP gun can be fired for precise selective targeting and can be used and re-used 1,000s times. The truck version can easily disable a large building, aircraft carrier or nuclear power plant. The reason I disclose this top secret is to make Americans aware that at least 2 of these truck sized devices are currently in hands of rogue CIA operatives who plan to use it against Americans for a new false flag attack next year and to blame Russians and start a new war against internal and external enemies.

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

CIA Tesla Gun - Death Ray Energy EMP Ion Cannon

This Pulse CIA EMP cannon was built in 2010 by Army General Alex Melnikov and Military Engineer Alex Williams in San Francisco, CA. Tested by me Igor Kryan aka Alexander Williams. After tests we had to replace all cell phones, computers, light bulbs in the building. It can easily disable truck, tank or small building. In 2013 CIA agent Rostislav Kryzhanovsky and Navy Engineer James Garcia commissioned 100 times more powerful truck version of this energy weapon in Fresno, CA. The beauty of this top secret weapon that regular EMP bomb is blown only once and target everything inside its circle while this pulse EMP gun can be fired for precise selective targeting and can be used and re-used 1,000s times. The truck version can easily disable a large building, aircraft carrier or nuclear power plant. The reason I disclose this top secret is to make Americans aware that at least 2 of these truck sized devices are currently in hands of rogue CIA operatives who plan to use it against Americans for a new false flag attack next year and to blame Russians and start a new war against internal and external enemies.

Calling All Cars: The Grinning Skull / Bad Dope / Black Vengeance

Calling All Cars: The Grinning Skull / Bad Dope / Black Vengeance

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Suspense: The 13th Sound / Always Room at the Top / Three Faces at Midnight

Suspense: The 13th Sound / Always Room at the Top / Three Faces at Midnight

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Suspense: Tree of Life / The Will to Power / Overture in Two Keys

Suspense: Tree of Life / The Will to Power / Overture in Two Keys

Alfred Hitchcock's first thriller was his third silent film The Lodger (1926), a suspenseful Jack the Ripper story. His next thriller was Blackmail (1929), his and Britain's first sound film. Of Hitchcock's fifteen major features made between 1925 and 1935, only six were suspense films, the two mentioned above plus Murder!, Number Seventeen, The Man Who Knew Too Much, and The 39 Steps. From 1935 on, however, most of his output was thrillers. One of the earliest spy films was Fritz Lang's Spies (1928), the director's first independent production, with an anarchist international conspirator and criminal spy character named Haghi (Rudolf Klein-Rogge), who was pursued by good-guy Agent No. 326 (Willy Fritsch) (aka Det. Donald Tremaine, English version) -- this film anticipated the James Bond films of the future. Another was Greta Garbo's portrayal of the real-life, notorious, seductive German double agent code-named Mata Hari (Gertrud Zelle) in World War I in Mata Hari (1932), who performed a pearl-draped dance to entice French officers to divulge their secrets. The chilling German film M (1931) directed by Fritz Lang, starred Peter Lorre (in his first film role) as a criminal deviant who preys on children. The film's story was based on the life of serial killer Peter Kurten (known as the 'Vampire of Düsseldorf'). Edward Sutherland's crime thriller Murders in the Zoo (1933) from Paramount starred Lionel Atwill as a murderous and jealous zoologist. Other British directors, such as Walter Forde, Victor Saville, George A. Cooper, and even the young Michael Powell made more thrillers in the same period; Forde made nine, Vorhaus seven between 1932 and 1935, Cooper six in the same period, and Powell the same. Hitchcock was following a strong British trend in his choice of genre. Notable examples of Hitchcock's early British suspense-thriller films include The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), his first spy-chase/romantic thriller, The 39 Steps (1935) with Robert Donat handcuffed to Madeleine Carroll and The Lady Vanishes (1938). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_thriller

Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes

Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Top Videa -  loading... Změnit krajinu
Načíst dalších 10 videí
 
 
Sorry, You can't play this video
00:00/00:00
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
CLOSE
CLOSE
CLOSE