Virtual Dissection 2 The Knee

Virtual Dissection 2 The Knee

Clinical Anatomy - Knee

Clinical Anatomy - Knee

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Clinical Anatomy - Knee mensicus

Clinical Anatomy - Knee mensicus

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Anatomie: L'articulation du genou

Anatomie: L'articulation du genou

La structure de l'articulation du genou est montrée au moyen de la vidéo d'anatomie "L'articulation du genou" de 3B Scientific®. Parallèlement aux os faisant partie de l'articulation du genou, l'appareil ligamentaire est expliqué en détail dans sa fonction. Les pathologies des ligaments, comme par exemple la déchirure de ligament croisé, sont expliquées en détail.

Knee Arteries - 3D Anatomy Tutorial

Knee Arteries - 3D Anatomy Tutorial

Knee arteries anatomy tutorial. Check out the 3D app at http://AnatomyLearning.com. More tutorials available on http://AnatomyZone.com. Learn all about the arterial supply to the knee in this 3D anatomy tutorial. The following structures are reviewed: - descending genicular artery - genicular arteries (lateral superior, lateral inferior, medial superior, medial inferior, middle) - anterior tibial recurrent - fibular circumflex - medial and lateral sural arteries - superficial femoral - popliteal - anterior and posterior tibial -------------------- Join the Facebook page for updates: http://www.facebook.com/anatomyzone Follow me on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anatomyzone Subscribe to the channel for more videos and updates: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theanatomyzone

Anatomy Of The Knee - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Anatomy Of The Knee  - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the knee joint. •Femur •Tibia •Fibula •Patella •Joint capsule: articular surface of the femur and articular surface of the patella. •Femoral condyles •Meniscus •Anterior cruciate ligament •Posterior cruciate ligament •Medial collateral ligament •Lateral collateral ligament •Quadriceps muscle attached to the patella •Patellar tendon •Hamstrings muscle at the back of the knee Several bursae are seen around the knees •Suprapatellar bursa •Prepatellar bursa •Infrapatellar bursa •Pes anserine bursa These bursae allow the knee cap to slide freely underneath the skin while bending and straightening the knee. The area of depression located at the back of the knee is called the popliteal fossa. Posterior view of the knee Posterior cruciate ligament Muscles: •popliteus •Plantaris •Soleus •Biceps femoris •Semitendinosus •Semimembranosus •Gastrocnemius Popliteal fossa: neurovascular bundle in the fossa •Popliteal artery and vein •Tibial nerve •Common peroneal nerve Both the tibial and the common peroneal nerves arise from the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve travels down the thigh to the area of the popliteal fossa and at this point it divides into the tibial and common peroneal nerves. The popliteal fossa is a closely packed space. It is bounded by the biceps femoris laterally as well as the semitendinosus and the semimembranosus medially. The lower part of the space is formed by the two head of the gastrocnemius muscle. On the medial side of the knee, you can find the arrangement of the tendons inserted in the tibia and the medial collateral ligament. On the medial side of the knee you can see the biceps femoris tendon and the iliotibial band. You can also see the lateral collateral ligament. The articular cartilage of the knee is different from the meniscus. it is worn out by aging and wear and tear. This condition is called osteoarthritis. The hyaline cartilage becomes roughened and bumpy. Injuries around the knee The quadriceps tendon, the patellar tendon and the patella cause active extension of the knee. Any disruption, the patient will be unable to actively extend the knee. In anterior cruciate ligament injury the tibia moves forward. In a posterior cruciate ligament injury the tibia moves backward. Rupture of the collateral ligament of the knee, lateral or medial, will cause abnormal side movement of the leg. Inside the knee between the femur and the tibia you will see the meniscus. healing of meniscal tear is good at the periphery because of good blood supply. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC

Anatomy: The Knee Joint

Anatomy: The Knee Joint

The 3B Scientific® Anatomy Video "Knee Joint" demonstrates the structure of the knee joint. In addition to the bones involved in the knee joint, the functions of the ligaments are described in detail. Injuries such as cruciate ligament rupture are clearly explained.

Knee Ligament Anatomy Animation

Knee Ligament Anatomy Animation

Dr. Bertram Zarins of the Mass General Hospital Sports Medicine Service has prepared this animation to educate patients about the anatomy of the ligaments which provide stability for the knee. For more information please visit http://www.MGHSportsMedicine.org

Anatomy Of The Patellar Tendon - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Anatomy Of The Patellar Tendon - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the Patellar tendon. The patellar tendon attaches the patella to the top of the tibia. The quadriceps muscle is attached superiorly to the patella. A small part of the quadriceps tendon then continues over the front of the patella to become the patellar tendon. Diagram showing the forces and constraints applied to the patella during function. Arterial supply of the patellar tendon: •Descending genicular artery •Superior medial genicular artery •Superior lateral genicular artery •Circumflex fibular artery •Anterior tibial artery •Inferior medial genicular artery. The patellar tendon works with the quadriceps to straighten the leg. Several bursae are seen around the patella •Suprapatellar •Prepatellar •Infrapatellar These bursae allow the knee cap to slide freely underneath the skin while bending and straightening the knee. The bursa may become inflamed due to trauma or infection, however, bursitis of the knee most commonly occurs over the kneecap. The femoral condyles are covered with hyaline cartilage and form the femoral trochlea. The patella articulates with the femoral trochlea. The patella lies just above the femoral trochlea when the knee is in full extension. The patella is classified as a sesamoid bone of the quadriceps tendon with a proximal base and a distal apex (triangular). The lateral facet is larger than the medial facet. The articular surface of the patella is covered with hyaline cartilage and has two articular facets for the femur. The apex which is the distal part is nonarticular. This area does give attachment to the patellar tendon. Patellar tendonitis may develop due to repeated stress being placed on the patellar tendon. This condition occurs in athletes from overuse. A weakened patellar tendon is more likely to tear and it may become torn when it attached to the kneecap. Patellar tendon tears can be either partial or complete. When the patellar tendon is ruptured, the quadriceps will pull the patella upward. Imaging tests such as an x-ray or MRI may be ordered to confirm the presence of a patellar tendon rupture. Complete tears can often be identified by x-ray alone. MRI showing rupture of the patellar tendon. One way to measure the patellar height is by measuring the Blumensaat’s line. The knee needs to be flexed at least 30 degrees then a line can be drawn through the roof of the intercondylar notch and usually touches the tip of the patella. The patella moves upward with the patellar tendon rupture (patella alta). Rupture of the quadriceps tendon causes patella Baja (infra). Lateral dislocation of the patella is also seen in “sunrise” view. May also cause direct impact injury to the medial patella and lateral femoral condyle. May also cause direct impact and injury to the medial patella and lateral femoral condyle. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC

Stryker Triathlon total knee navigation setup 1

Stryker Triathlon total knee navigation setup 1

Navigation setup with Stryker Triathlon total knee system. Basics...

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