Virtual Dissection 2 The Knee

Virtual Dissection 2 The Knee

Anatomy Series, The Knee by Dr. Shakti Chandra

Anatomy Series, The Knee by Dr. Shakti Chandra

Anatomy of the lower limb

Knee injury ,Injuries - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Knee  injury ,Injuries - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing the anatomy and associated injuries of the knee joint. Disrupted quadriceps •Patient is unable to actively extend the knee. The most common cause of ACL ruptures: •Traumatic force being applied during twisting motion. •Side stepping or landing from a jump. Patient complains of: •Immediate pain •Knee giving way •Swelling Aspiration of the knee •If aspiration of the knee joint shows evidence of blood within the joint there is 75-80% chance of ACL and meniscal injury. Lachamn’s test- ACL knee exam •Knee is flexed at 30 degrees. •ACL tear of the knee is identified by pulling on the tibia and examining the frontward motion of the lower leg in comparison to the upper leg. Radiological exam – ACL •MRI of the knee joint shows bone lesions or bruising associated with tears of the ACL. Injury is found in the typical location; middle of the femoral condyle and posterior part of the tibia laterally. Posterior cruciate ligament tear (PCL) •Common cause of injury is a bent knee hitting a dashboard in a car accident. Tibial Sag Test –PCL knee exam Quadriceps active test-PCL knee exam •The examiner stabilizes the leg of the patient and then the patient is asked to actively contract the quadriceps muscle. •The tibia is seen actively reduced from the posterior subluxed position. Lachman’s test-PCL knee exam •Knee is bent 20-30 degrees. •The posterior drawer test is carried out while the patient is in a supine position and the knee is flexed to 90 degrees. •The amount of translation of the tibia relative to the femur is observed. The dial test is performed while the patient is in the supine or prone position and both knees are in 90 and 30 degrees of flexion. More than 10 degrees of external rotation indicates significant injury. Common meniscal tears Symptoms include •Knee pain •Pain with straightening the knee •Swelling •Locking •Weakness

Anatomie: L'articulation du genou

Anatomie: L'articulation du genou

La structure de l'articulation du genou est montrée au moyen de la vidéo d'anatomie "L'articulation du genou" de 3B Scientific®. Parallèlement aux os faisant partie de l'articulation du genou, l'appareil ligamentaire est expliqué en détail dans sa fonction. Les pathologies des ligaments, comme par exemple la déchirure de ligament croisé, sont expliquées en détail.

Rotation of the midgut

Rotation of the midgut

An animation for students and teachers of human embryology by Dr. Robert Acland, Department of Anatomical Sciences, University of Louisville. This animation has now been added to the online edition of "Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy", at aclandanatomy.com

Clinical Anatomy - Knee

Clinical Anatomy - Knee

Where do I get my information from: http://armandoh.org/dig HIT THE LIKE BUTTON! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105 SPECIAL THANKS: Patreon members

Muscles, part 1 - Muscle Cells: Crash Course A&P #21

Muscles, part 1 - Muscle Cells: Crash Course A&P #21

We're kicking off our exploration of muscles with a look at the complex and important relationship between actin and myosin. Your smooth, cardiac, and skeletal muscles create movement by contracting and releasing in a process called the sliding filament model. Your skeletal muscles are constructed like a rope made of bundles of protein fibers, and that the smallest strands are your actin and myosin myofilaments. Its their use of calcium and ATP that causes the binding and unbinding that makes sarcomeres contract and relax. Table of Contents Smooth, Cardiac, and Skeletal Muscles Create Movement 1:18 Sliding Filament Model 4:52 Skeletal Muscles Are Made of Bundles of Protein Fibers 2:40 Actin and Myosin Myofilaments 3:54 Calcium and ATP Cause the Binding and Unbinding 5:05 *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: SEM students FROM: Mrs. S You are confident and courageous! I believe in you! DFTBA! -- TO: Zachary FROM: She who gave you life! You, like the Mongols, will always be the exception. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: David Rybka, Beth Larter, Damian Shaw, Randy Goldberg MD, Cynthia Krohn, Allison DeVoe, Brinae Lois Gaudet, Sara Bovi, Stephen DeCubellis, Travis Bell -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

Cow Eyeball Dissection

Cow Eyeball Dissection

Mmm..juicy, juicy eyeballs! Join your guides, "Lefty" and "Righty" once more, as they look deeply into the eyes of a cow that's given its all during this Anatomy & Physiology (Bio 201) lab dissection. If any or all of this video is used under the Creative Commons license, PLEASE let me know by leaving a comment with a link to where to find your work.

Top 3 Signs You Have a Meniscus Tear in Your Knee. Tests You Can Do

Top 3 Signs You Have a Meniscus Tear in Your Knee. Tests You Can Do

Famous Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck describe 3 tests you can do to determine if you have torn the cartilage or meniscus in your knee. Simple to do. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain

Inferior Mesenteric Artery - Anatomy Tutorial

Inferior Mesenteric Artery - Anatomy Tutorial

http://www.anatomyzone.com 3D video anatomy tutorial on the inferior mesenteric artery using the Zygote Body Browser (http://www.zygotebody.com). If you want to learn about the arterial blood supply to the abdominal organs, this video provides a background on the inferior mesenteric artery which supplies the hindgut structures. I have also done a tutorial on the coeliac axis and the superior mesenteric artery which relate to this tutorial, so check them out as well! Join the Facebook page for updates: http://www.facebook.com/anatomyzone Follow me on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anatomyzone Subscribe to the channel for more videos and updates: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theanatomyzone

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