Kīlauea Summit Eruption | Lava Returns to Halemaʻumaʻu

Kīlauea Summit Eruption | Lava Returns to Halemaʻumaʻu

In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u, a crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaiʻi. This new vent is one of two ongoing eruptions on the volcano. The other is on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, where vents have been erupting nearly nonstop since 1983. The duration of these simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions on Kīlauea is unmatched in at least 200 years. Since 2008, Kīlauea’s summit eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and an active, circulating lava lake. Because of ongoing volcanic hazards associated with the summit vent, including the emission of high levels of sulfur dioxide gas and fragments of hot lava and rock explosively hurled onto the crater rim, the area around Halemaʻumaʻu remains closed to the public as of 2017. Through historical photos of past Halemaʻumaʻu eruptions and stunning 4K imagery of the current eruption, this 24-minute program tells the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake—now one of the two largest lava lakes in the world. It begins with a Hawaiian chant that expresses traditional observations of a bubbling lava lake and reflects the connections between science and culture that continue on Kīlauea today. The video briefly recounts the eruptive history of Halemaʻumaʻu and describes the formation and continued growth of the current summit vent and lava lake. It features USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists sharing their insights on the summit eruption—how they monitor the lava lake, how and why the lake level rises and falls, why explosive events occur, the connection between Kīlauea’s ongoing summit and East Rift Zone eruptions, and the impacts of the summit eruption on the Island of Hawaiʻi and beyond. Additional Credits: Producers: Janet Babb and Steve Wessells Writers: Janet Babb, Donna Matrazzo, and Steve Wessells Director of Photography: Richard Lyons ---------- Find this video and thousands more at https://usgs.gov/gallery. Stay up-to-date on USGS topics and news on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and more at https://usgs.gov/socialmedia. DYK? The USGS.gov site is completely mobile! Ditch the desktop and browse the latest earth science on your mobile device. Go to https://usgs.gov.

Polar Bear - POV Cams (Spring 2014)

Polar Bear - POV Cams (Spring 2014)

http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/811 This video was edited and compiled from raw footage recorded by a camera equipped radio collar that was put on a female polar bear in the Beaufort Sea during April 2014 by the US Geological Survey. This new type of camera technology was developed by videographer Adam Ravetch with the support of the World Wildlife Fund. The video, which is the first ever from a free-ranging polar bear on Arctic sea ice, shows an interaction with a potential mate, playing with food, and swimming at the water's surface and under the sea ice. These videos will be used by the US Geological Survey in research to understand polar bear behavior and energetics in an Arctic with declining sea ice. Note: Some creative license has been taken to make this footage easier to follow and understand, including playful language that helps describe the polar bear's actions.

Time-lapse images of Mount St. Helens dome growth 2004-2008

Time-lapse images of Mount St. Helens dome growth 2004-2008

http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/628 The rapid onset of unrest at Mount St. Helens on September 23, 2004 initiated an uninterrupted lava-dome-building eruption that continued until 2008. The initial phase produced rapid growth of a lava dome as magma pushed upward. As shown in the video, an initial succession of lava spines, two recumbent and one steeply sloping, grew to nearly 500 m in length before disintegrating into mounds of rubble. The trajectory of lava extrusion was affected by the geometry of the crater, particularly the proximity of the vent to the south crater wall, and by the growing volume of erupted material.

Kīlauea Volcano — Fissure 8 Flow: From Vent to Sea

Kīlauea Volcano — Fissure 8 Flow: From Vent to Sea

A helicopter overflight video of the lower East Rift Zone on June 14, 2018, around 6:00 AM, shows lava fountaining at fissure 8 feeding channelized lava flows that flow into the ocean. Lava is still flowing out of fissure 8 unabated and the channel is full. At the start of the video, standing waves in the lava channel can be seen near the vent exit. The channel appears crust-free from vent to the bend around Kapoho Crater. A surface crust forms over the channel as it spreads out during its approach to the ocean. The overflight along the ocean entry is from north to south along the coastline. The ocean entry is active along the whole length - approximately 1 mile. Small litoral explosions are occurring and there are several plumes of laze. ---------- Find this video and thousands more at https://usgs.gov/gallery. Stay up-to-date on USGS topics and news on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and more at https://usgs.gov/socialmedia. DYK? The USGS.gov site is completely mobile! Ditch the desktop and browse the latest earth science on your mobile device. Go to https://usgs.gov.

1964 Quake: The Great Alaska Earthquake

1964 Quake: The Great Alaska Earthquake

http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/755 "1964 Quake: The Great Alaska Earthquake" is an eleven minute video highlighting the impacts and effects of America's largest recorded earthquake. It is an expanded version of the four minute video "Magnitude 9.2". Both were created as part of USGS activities acknowledging the fifty year anniversary of the quake on March 27, 2014. The video features USGS geologist George Plafker, who, in the 1960's, correctly interpreted the quake as a subduction zone event. This was a great leap forward in resolving key mechanisms of the developing theory of plate tectonics. Landslide impacts and the extreme tsunami threat posed by these quakes are also discussed. Loss of life and destruction from the earthquake and accompanying tsunamis was the impetus for things like the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers and the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program.

Lake Mead: Clear and Vital

Lake Mead: Clear and Vital

http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/643 "Lake Mead -- Clear and Vital" is a thirteen minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

Kīlauea Volcano, Halemaʻumaʻu Crater, Summit Vent Lava Lake (4K B-Roll)

Kīlauea Volcano, Halemaʻumaʻu Crater, Summit Vent Lava Lake (4K B-Roll)

Stunning 4K aerial and ground b-roll of the Kīlauea Volcano Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Summit Vent Lava Lake taken between July 24 and July 31, 2016. Here is the shotlist: 00:11 Kīlauea summit lava lake spatter, night, medium shot 00:33 Lava lake spatter, night medium shot 00:43 Lava lake wide shot, night, spatter on right of frame 1:01 Wide shot, Evening pan right to left Halemaʻumaʻu Crater to lava lake, with Mauna Loa in background 1:26 Helicopter aerial early morning, half of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater and lava lake 1:44 Helicopter aerial early morning, medium shot, lava lake passing over Halemaʻumaʻu Crater rim and gas plume 1:54 Summit Lava lake surface, evening, seams of incandescent lava exposed as dark-colored crust pulls apart 2:10 Helicopter aerial Halemaʻumaʻu Crater with lava lake inside 2:24 Halemaʻumaʻu Crater telephoto from above rim, gas plume 2:31 Halemaʻumaʻu Day, pan to lava lake 2:59 Lava spatter in lava lake, close up, day 3:21 Lava lake surface, day, black, large lava bubble surfaces 3:40 Lava lake surface, day, silver lava crust, (tectonic plate-analogs) stretch across surface 3:54 Helicopter aerial, day, lava lake most of screen 4:02 Helicopter aerial, night, lava lake most of screen too 4:10 Lava lake full screen, night and gas plume and spatter on edge 4:20 Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park sign 4:28 Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), U.S. Geological Survey Sign 4:40 HVO building shot, crater gas plume behind 4:47 Tina Neal, USGS, addressing assembled USGS HVO employees 4:59 Don Swanson, USGS, on edge of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater rim measuring lava lake surface height with instrument, gas plume behind 5:10 Pan Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Rim, web cam to Don Swanson, USGS, measuring 5:20 Don Swanson, USGS, measuring 5:28 Don Swanson, USGS, writing in a field notebook 5:44 Jeff Sutton, USGS, writing in notebook in field 5:53 Jeff Sutton, USGS, medium, writing in notebook then gets up and looks down instrument into lava lake 6:12 Lava spatter day, veil of gas obscures shot 6:21 Matt Patrick, USGS, in field, silhouette walking by gear 6:34 Matt Patrick, USGS, walking past camera toward over look into crater 6:45 Matt Patrick, USGS, at web cam at crater rim, grabs measuring instrument and looks into lava lake 7:02 Matt Patrick, USGS, close up face looking through lake level measuring device 7:11 Matt Patrick, USGS, medium shot pulls out note book 7:23 Matt Patrick, USGS, close up writing tilts up to face 7:30 Pan web cam to other instrument overlooking lava lake 7:44 3 USGS scientists approach helicopter 7:49 USGS Scientists walk around helicopter 7:55 Helicopter takes off 8:11 Helicopter aerial, scientists in field in lava area, tilts up to show orange glow in skylight 8:24 USGS scientists in mission control area of HVO observing seismic readouts 8:29 Close up Map screen and seismic readouts 8:37 Close up USGS scientists’ hands and note book 8:41 Same USGS scientists from behind 8:52 Thomas A. Jaggar Museum, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Sign and people 8:59 Jaggar Museum entry 9:10 Jaggar Museum lookout area 9:17 NPS Volunteer close up shot presenting to crowd 9:28 Lava lake spatter, day, gas plume covers end of shot 10:05 Lava lake spatter night close up 10:38 Lava lake spatter night wide shot 10:58 Helicopter aerial, wide shot, shows USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and NPS Jaggar Museum, Kīlauea Volcano summit caldera rim, and all of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater (within caldera), summit vent lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu, and gas plume 11:11 End title ***Please credit U.S. Geological Survey for using this footage Videographer: Name: Contact: Janet Babb Org: USGS Title: Geologist/Public Information Email: jbabb@usgs.gov Additional Credits: Executive Producer: Janet Babb Technical Contact: Janet Babb, jbabb@usgs.gov, (808) 967-8844 Alternate contact: askhvo@usgs.gov, (808) 967-7328 Camera: Richard Lyons, Stephen M. Wessells Distribution: Don Becker, becker@usgs.gov

Mount St. Helens: May 18, 1980

Mount St. Helens: May 18, 1980

For more information visit: http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/234 USGS scientists recount their experiences before, during and after the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Loss of their colleague David A. Johnston and 56 others in the eruption cast a pall over one of the most dramatic geologic moments in American history.

Kīlauea Volcano — Video Compilation of Kapoho Bay Ocean Entry

Kīlauea Volcano — Video Compilation of Kapoho Bay Ocean Entry

Audio Description version at: https://www.usgs.gov/media/videos/k-lauea-volcano-video-compilation-kapoho-bay-ocean-entry This short video compilation shows conditions at Kapoho Bay during a helicopter overflight on June 4, 2018, around 6:15 a.m. HST and again around 1:38 p.m. HST. By 6:15 a.m., lava from fissure 8 had entered the ocean for over seven hours. The flow front was about a half-mile wide, with lava building a delta a few hundred yards into the bay. The ocean entry sends a large laze plume into the air along the coastline. In the second video, taken about seven hours later (around 1:38 p.m.), lava had nearly filled the shallow bay. ---------- Find this video and thousands more at https://usgs.gov/gallery. Stay up-to-date on USGS topics and news on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and more at https://usgs.gov/socialmedia. DYK? The USGS.gov site is completely mobile! Ditch the desktop and browse the latest earth science on your mobile device. Go to https://usgs.gov.

Forecasting Ashfall Impacts from a Yellowstone Supereruption

Forecasting Ashfall Impacts from a Yellowstone Supereruption

Presenter: Larry Mastin, USGS Hydrologist - Yellowstone is one of a few dozen volcanoes on earth capable of "supereruptions" that expel more than 1,000 cubic km of ash and debris. - The plumes from such eruptions can rise 30 to 50 km into the atmosphere, three to five times as high as most jets fly. - Yellowstone has produced three supereruptions in the past 2.1 million years. The most recent was 0.6 million years ago. - Eruptions this large can create their own continental- scale wind field, pushing ash more than 1,000 km against the prevailing, ambient wind field.

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