Timothy Snyder, "On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From The 20th Century"

Timothy Snyder, "On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From The 20th Century"

http://www.politics-prose.com/book/9780804190114 Snyder is the award-winning author of Bloodlands and Black Earth, and his extensive study of the Holocaust has made him one of the foremost experts on authoritarian movements. In this brief and urgent call-to-action, Snyder, the Housum Professor of history at Yale, identifies striking parallels between the political landscape of pre-war Europe and today’s United States. History’s lessons are many, however, and while democracies can fail, they can also resist and grow stronger. From the examples of the twentieth century, Snyder has distilled twenty essential points that should guide the current struggle. They are as simple as “do not obey in advance” and “beware the one-party state,” and as inspiring as “contribute to good causes” and “learn from peers in other countries.” Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics and Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.'s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics and Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/ Produced by Tom Warren

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Americans call the Second World War “The Good War.” But before it even began, America’s wartime ally Josef Stalin had killed millions of his own citizens—and kept killing them during and after the war. Before Hitler was finally defeated, he had murdered six million Jews and nearly as many other Europeans. At war’s end, both the German and the Soviet killing sites fell behind the iron curtain, leaving the history of mass killing in darkness. Bloodlands is a new kind of European history, presenting the mass murders committed by the Nazi and Stalinist regimes as two aspects of a single history, in the time and place where they occurred: between Germany and Russia, when Hitler and Stalin both held power. Assiduously researched, deeply humane, and utterly definitive, Bloodlands will be required reading for anyone seeking to understand the central tragedy of modern history. From Booklist If there is an explanation for the political killing perpetrated in eastern Europe in the 1930s and 1940s, historian Snyder roots it in agriculture. Stalin wanted to collectivize farmers; Hitler wanted to eliminate them so Germans could colonize the land. The dictators wielded frightening power to advance such fantasies toward reality, and the despots toted up about 14 million corpses between them, so stupefying a figure that Snyder sets himself three goals here: to break down the number into the various actions of murder that comprise it, from liquidation of the kulaks to the final solution; to restore humanity to the victims via surviving testimony to their fates; and to deny Hitler and Stalin any historical justification for their policies, which at the time had legions of supporters and have some even today. Such scope may render Snyder’s project too imposing to casual readers, but it would engage those exposed to the period’s chronology and major interpretive issues, such as the extent to which the Nazi and Soviet systems may be compared. Solid and judicious scholarship for large WWII collections.

Timothy Snyder On Tyranny | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

Timothy Snyder On Tyranny | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

Subscribe to the Real Time YouTube: http://itsh.bo/10r5A1B Yale professor and historian Timothy Snyder joins Bill to discuss his latest book, “On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.” Original air date: March 24, 2017. Connect with Real Time Online: Find Real Time on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Maher Find Real Time on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RealTimers Find Real Time with Bill Maher Official Site: http://itsh.bo/HttKcM. Find Real Time with Bill Maher on HBO GO® http://itsh.bo/iioY87. Find Real Time with Bill Maher on Connect: http://connect.hbo.com/real-time-bill... Find Real Time on Instagram: http://instagram.com/realtimers The Real Time blog: http://www.real-time-with-bill-maher-... It's HBO. Connect with HBO Online Find HBO on Facebook: http://Facebook.com/HBO Follow @HBO on Twitter: http://Twitter.com/HBO Find HBO on Youtube: http://Youtube.com/HBO Find HBO Official Site: http://HBO.com Find HBO Connect: http://Connect.hbo.com Find HBO GO: http://HBOGO.com Find HBO on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/hbo Find HBO on Foursquare: http://Foursquare.com/hbo Check out other HBO Channels HBO: http://www.youtube.com/hbo Game of Thrones: http://www.youtube.com/GameofThrones True Blood: http://www.youtube.com/trueblood HBO Sports: http://www.youtube.com/HBOsports HBO Documentary Films: http://www.youtube.com/HBODocs Cinemax: http://www.youtube.com/Cinemax HBO Latino: http://www.youtube.com/HBOLatino

How to stop politics from controlling your emotions | Tim Snyder

How to stop politics from controlling your emotions | Tim Snyder

Has the constant barrage of political news got you down? Yale University historian Timothy Snyder reminds us that looking at things from a historical perspective—and comparing your own perspective to this—can help you from becoming overwhelmed... and keep your emotions in check when you browse your newsfeed. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/timothy-snyder-3-ways-to-avoid-the-emotional-drain-of-politics-today Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink History is actually the one thing I think which allows you to get out ahead. It’s very ironic, because when people think about history they think, “Well, history means that things are going on in the world and a historian is off reading dusty books,” which, fair enough, I would love to be reading lots of dusty books right now. I will concede the point. But when you’ve read all those dusty books, what happens is that you have the ability to see certain patterns, you have a sense of what fits together and what doesn’t fit together. Isaiah Berlin wrote an essay on the possibility of the scientific history, in which he said that “history is not about knowing what happens, it’s about knowing what can’t happen.” That is extremely useful. So a historian will never look at a problem and say, “This is entirely new,” a historian will look at a problem and try to find the familiar aspects of it. And that’s a very big advantage over other forms of analysis, because if you look at something and say that it’s totally new, that disables the mind right away, it also tends to disable, I think, political action. Because if something is totally new it’s very easy to take the next step and say, “Well if it’s totally new then what can I do about it?” Or you can say, “Since it’s totally new all things are permitted,” which can also lead you in some really unproductive direction. So the first thing the historian will do is we’ll say, “Whatever this problem is, it’s not entirely new.” When a historian is confronted by something very surprising like the 2016 campaign in the United States, the historian is likely to say, “Well, the things that this candidate is saying aren’t true, but the possibility this kind of campaign could work is a real possibility.” So the historian is freed from, or should be freed from the conviction of the day, and the historian automatically looks back to other moments where similar things like this coalesced. So for example, we’re in a second globalization. There was a first globalization in the late 19th and early 20th century. The second globalization began, our globalization began, with all kinds of promises that technology and export-lead growth would lead to enlightenment and liberalism—the first globalization did too. The first globalization crashed. It crashed into the first World War, the Great Depression, the second World War, Stalinism, the Holocaust. A historian looking at today won’t think “Well that whole pattern is going to repeat itself,” but the historian looking at it today can say, “Yeah, a politician who says that globalization is a problem not a solution, a politician who says that globalization is a matter of particular people plotting against us as opposed to objective threats to the country or objective problems, that kind of politician has a chance. That can work. Things like that have worked before.” And once you see that it can come together that way, it’s not that you’re sure, it’s not that you predict it (although I have made some predictions that were right), but it’s more that you can see it coming together, and then that allows you to get out ahead, and you can think, “Okay, well, if this is going to come together this way then I can also steal from the past people’s correct reactions to it or people’s wise reactions to it. I can use those things from the failure of the first of globalization, I can just borrow them, I can now extract them and put them in the 21st century,” which is what I did in On Tyranny. So rather than saying, “Okay I’m going to wait” – because by the time the pattern actually coalesces it’s too late! You have to see that the pattern might be coalescing and then start messing with the pattern, that the way that you see in coalescing comes from history, and the tools that you use to start messing with it also come from history. So in that way, ironically, history can allow you to get out ahead of something, whereas the journalists naturally have to describe that—that’s their job. The social scientists they’re going to wait to categorize it, and they’re kind of trapped. I mean another irony is that historians are comfortable with novelty, because we know things change all the time. When your perspective is a thousand years or even a hundred years, you know stuff changes. You know there are turning points.

Timothy Snyder, "The Road to Unfreedom"

Timothy Snyder, "The Road to Unfreedom"

Timothy Snyder discusses his book, "The Road to Unfreedom", at Politics and Prose on 4/7/18. Snyder’s follow-up to On Tyranny moves from showing how to resist authoritarianism to tracing the path of its recent resurgence. Starting with Putin’s consolidation of power in Russia, Snyder charts the rise of nationalists and oligarchs from Hungary and Poland to Britain and the U.S. Noting that the threat these movements pose to Western institutions aligns with Putin’s goals, Snyder advises us that they also reflect weaknesses and vulnerabilities within liberal democratic systems. As he urges us to act on the choice between individuality and totality, Snyder frames this moment of crisis as an opportunity to better understand and affirm the values and principles underlying our imperiled political order. https://www.politics-prose.com/book/9780525574460 Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics and Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.'s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics and Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/ Produced by Tom Warren

Timothy Snyder Discusses His New Book The Road to Unfreedom

Timothy Snyder Discusses His New Book The Road to Unfreedom

Acclaimed scholar Timothy Snyder—author of On Tyranny—discusses his new book The Road to Unfreedom, a stunning new chronicle of the rise of authoritarianism from Russia to Europe to America. Please note: The audio on this recording is low; you may need to increase your playback volume.

ON TYRANNY: Lessons From the 20th Century with Author Timothy Snyder

ON TYRANNY: Lessons From the 20th Century with Author Timothy Snyder

In his latest book, “On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From The Twentieth Century,” award-winning author and historian Timothy Snyder warns of new threats to the political order that are not unlike the totalitarianism of the past. A Washington Post reviewer wrote that Snyder’s new book, “fits alongside your pocket Constitution and feels only slightly less vital.” His warnings and lessons from history provide the focus for this edition of Wilson Center NOW. Guest Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University and the author of the new best-selling book, “On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From The Twentieth Century.” His previous works include, “Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin” and “Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning.” Snyder is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and is a permanent fellow of the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. Host John Milewski is the executive producer and managing editor of Wilson Center NOW and also serves as director of Wilson Center ON DEMAND digital programming. Previously he served as host and producer of Dialogue at the Wilson Center and Close Up on C-SPAN. He also teaches a course on politics and media for Penn State’s Washington Program.

A Republic, If You Can Keep It: Masha Gessen Talks Autocracy with Timothy Snyder

A Republic, If You Can Keep It: Masha Gessen Talks Autocracy with Timothy Snyder

Government by the people is a powerful and beautiful system, but one that is not impervious to threats. Two political thought leaders, Russian-American journalist and author of the forthcoming "The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Retook Russia," Masha Gessen, and esteemed academic and author of "On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century," Timothy Snyder, sit down to discuss the global rise of nationalism and America's political future. Thursday, May 25, 2017

Book: The Road to Unfreedom by Timothy Snyder

Book: The Road to Unfreedom by Timothy Snyder

Timothy Snyder discusses his book, "The Road to Unfreedom", at Politics and Prose on 4/7/18. *** The Russian philosopher mentioned by Timothy Snyder in this lecture is Ivan Ilyin. Ivan Ilyin's Selected Writings are available for free download at RareAudioBooks.com as a PDF and other ebook formats. Hopefully this example of Ilyin's writings will give the reader a better idea of the 'Politics of Eternity,' which Mr. Snyder is discussing. *** Snyder’s follow-up to On Tyranny moves from showing how to resist authoritarianism to tracing the path of its recent resurgence. Starting with Putin’s consolidation of power in Russia, Snyder charts the rise of nationalists and oligarchs from Hungary and Poland to Britain and the U.S. Noting that the threat these movements pose to Western institutions aligns with Putin’s goals, Snyder advises us that they also reflect weaknesses and vulnerabilities within liberal democratic systems. As he urges us to act on the choice between individuality and totality, Snyder frames this moment of crisis as an opportunity to better understand and affirm the values and principles underlying our imperiled political order. https://www.politics-prose.com/book/9... Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics and Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.'s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics and Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/ Produced by Tom Warren

Waking Up With Sam Harris #79 -The Road to Tyranny (with Timothy Snyder)

Waking Up With Sam Harris #79 -The Road to Tyranny (with Timothy Snyder)

In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Timothy Snyder about his book On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century. Timothy Snyder is a professor of history at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1997, where he was a British Marshall Scholar. Before joining the faculty at Yale in 2001, he held fellowships in Paris, Vienna, and Warsaw, and an Academy Scholarship at Harvard. He has spent some ten years in Europe, and speaks five and reads ten European languages. He has also written for The New York Review of Books, Foreign Affairs, The Times Literary Supplement, The Nation, and The New Republic as well as for The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, and other newspapers. He is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. He is the author of several award-winning books including The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke, Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin, and Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning. His latest book, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century reached #1 on the New York Times bestseller list for nonfiction. Discuss this in the forums Do you find the Waking Up podcast valuable? You can support the show directly at: https://samharris.org/subscribe Supporters get access to Sam's "Ask Me Anything" episodes, advance tickets to live events, and other exclusive content. More information at https://www.samharris.org -- Subscribe to the podcast on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/samharrisorg Follow Sam on Twitter: https://twitter.com/samharrisorg Follow Sam on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Samharrisorg/

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