The Origins of Mass Killing: the bloodlands hypothesis

The Origins of Mass Killing: the bloodlands hypothesis

Speaker: Professor Timothy Snyder Chair: Professor Arne Westad Recorded on 21 January 2014 in Old Theatre, Old Building. At no other time in European history were so many human beings deliberately killed as a matter of policy as in Eastern Europe between 1933 and 1945. In the lands between Berlin and Moscow, the Soviets killed more than four million by starvation and bullets, the Germans more than twice that number by starvation, bullets, and gas. Most deliberate Soviet killing, and almost all deliberate Nazi killing, took place in this zone. If we can understand the totality of the catastrophe, we will better understand the two regimes, and we may be better prepared to understand its component parts, the most significant of which was the Holocaust of European Jews. Professor Timothy Snyder is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs, 2013/2014.

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Americans call the Second World War “The Good War.” But before it even began, America’s wartime ally Josef Stalin had killed millions of his own citizens—and kept killing them during and after the war. Before Hitler was finally defeated, he had murdered six million Jews and nearly as many other Europeans. At war’s end, both the German and the Soviet killing sites fell behind the iron curtain, leaving the history of mass killing in darkness. Bloodlands is a new kind of European history, presenting the mass murders committed by the Nazi and Stalinist regimes as two aspects of a single history, in the time and place where they occurred: between Germany and Russia, when Hitler and Stalin both held power. Assiduously researched, deeply humane, and utterly definitive, Bloodlands will be required reading for anyone seeking to understand the central tragedy of modern history. From Booklist If there is an explanation for the political killing perpetrated in eastern Europe in the 1930s and 1940s, historian Snyder roots it in agriculture. Stalin wanted to collectivize farmers; Hitler wanted to eliminate them so Germans could colonize the land. The dictators wielded frightening power to advance such fantasies toward reality, and the despots toted up about 14 million corpses between them, so stupefying a figure that Snyder sets himself three goals here: to break down the number into the various actions of murder that comprise it, from liquidation of the kulaks to the final solution; to restore humanity to the victims via surviving testimony to their fates; and to deny Hitler and Stalin any historical justification for their policies, which at the time had legions of supporters and have some even today. Such scope may render Snyder’s project too imposing to casual readers, but it would engage those exposed to the period’s chronology and major interpretive issues, such as the extent to which the Nazi and Soviet systems may be compared. Solid and judicious scholarship for large WWII collections.

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

Professor Snyder teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in modern East European political history. He is the author and co-editor of several award-winning books. We talk with Professor Snyder about his most recent book, a critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller entitled Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin.

Timothy Snyder Discusses "Bloodlands" at The Ukrainian Museum of Modern Art

Timothy Snyder Discusses "Bloodlands" at The Ukrainian Museum of Modern Art

Timothy Snyder, historian of Eastern European history, talks about his book "Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin." The event took place at The Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art and was presented by The Chicago Business & Professional Group (Anna M. Mostovych, President). "Americans call the Second World War 'The Good War.' But before it even began, America's wartime ally Josef Stalin had killed millions of his own citizens--and kept killing them during and after the war. Before Hitler was finally defeated, he had murdered six million Jews and nearly as many other Europeans. At war's end, both the German and the Soviet killing sites fell behind the iron curtain, leaving the history of mass killing in darkness. Bloodlands is a new kind of European history, presenting the mass murders committed by the Nazi and Stalinist regimes as two aspects of a single history, in the time and place where they occurred: between Germany and Russia, when Hitler and Stalin both held power."

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 2/2

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 2/2

Americans call the Second World War “The Good War.” But before it even began, America’s wartime ally Josef Stalin had killed millions of his own citizens—and kept killing them during and after the war. Before Hitler was finally defeated, he had murdered six million Jews and nearly as many other Europeans. At war’s end, both the German and the Soviet killing sites fell behind the iron curtain, leaving the history of mass killing in darkness. Bloodlands is a new kind of European history, presenting the mass murders committed by the Nazi and Stalinist regimes as two aspects of a single history, in the time and place where they occurred: between Germany and Russia, when Hitler and Stalin both held power. Assiduously researched, deeply humane, and utterly definitive, Bloodlands will be required reading for anyone seeking to understand the central tragedy of modern history. From Booklist If there is an explanation for the political killing perpetrated in eastern Europe in the 1930s and 1940s, historian Snyder roots it in agriculture. Stalin wanted to collectivize farmers; Hitler wanted to eliminate them so Germans could colonize the land. The dictators wielded frightening power to advance such fantasies toward reality, and the despots toted up about 14 million corpses between them, so stupefying a figure that Snyder sets himself three goals here: to break down the number into the various actions of murder that comprise it, from liquidation of the kulaks to the final solution; to restore humanity to the victims via surviving testimony to their fates; and to deny Hitler and Stalin any historical justification for their policies, which at the time had legions of supporters and have some even today. Such scope may render Snyder’s project too imposing to casual readers, but it would engage those exposed to the period’s chronology and major interpretive issues, such as the extent to which the Nazi and Soviet systems may be compared. Solid and judicious scholarship for large WWII collections.

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder Audiobook Full 1/2

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

Timothy Snyder is a professor of history at Yale University. An expert on eastern Europe and the second world war, he has published numerous books and written articles for periodicals such as the New York Review of Books, Times Literary Supplement, New Republic, Prospect and the Nation. Blair Ruble is Director of the Wilson Centers oldest program, the Kennan Institute, and also directs the centers Comparative Urban Studies Program. His latest book is Washington's U Street: A Biography.

Timothy Synder "Bloodlands"

Timothy Synder "Bloodlands"

Author Timothy Snyder talks about his book, "Bloodlands."

Timothy Snyder - Why History Matters

Timothy Snyder - Why History Matters

Timothy Snyder is one of the leading American historians and public intellectuals, and enjoys perhaps greater prominence in Europe, the subject of most of his work. He is the Richard Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1997, where he was a British Marshall Scholar. Before joining the faculty at Yale in 2001, he held fellowships in Paris, Vienna, and Warsaw, and an Academy Scholarship at Harvard. He speaks five and reads ten European languages. Among his publications are six single-authored award-winning books, all of which have been translated: Nationalism, Marxism, and Modern Central Europe: A Biography of Kazimierz Kelles-Krauz (1998, second edition 2016); The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569-1999 (2003); Sketches from a Secret War: A Polish Artist’s Mission to Liberate Soviet Ukraine (2005); The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke (2008); Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (2010); and Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning. Bloodlands won twelve awards including the Emerson Prize in the Humanities, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Leipzig Award for European Understanding, and the Hannah Arendt Prize in Political Thought. It has been translated into thirty-three languages, was named to twelve book-of-the-year lists, and was a bestseller in six countries. Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning (2015) will appear in some thirty foreign editions. It has been a bestseller in four countries and has received multiple distinctions including the award of the Dutch Auschwitz Committee. Snyder is also the co-editor of two books: Wall Around the West: State Borders and Immigration Controls in Europe and North America (2001) and Stalin and Europe: Terror, War, Domination (2013). His most recent book is On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, it appeared in the United States in February 2017 and will be available in numerous foreign editions. In a very special project, Snyder helped his friend, the distinguished historian and intellectual Tony Judt, to compose a thematic history of political ideas and intellectuals in politics, Thinking the Twentieth Century (2012). Snyder's essays on the Ukrainian revolution were published in in Russian and Ukrainian as Ukrainian History, Russian Politics, European Futures (2014). A broader range of essays was published in Czech as The Politics of Life and Death (2015). Snyder sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Modern European History and East European Politics and Societies. His scholarly articles have appeared in Past and Present, the Journal of Cold War Studies, and other journals; he has also written for The New York Review of Books, Foreign Affairs, The Times Literary Supplement, The Nation, and The New Republic as well as for The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, and other newspapers. Snyder was the recipient of an inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellowship in 2015 and received the Havel Foundation prize the same year. He has received state orders from Estonia, Lithuania, and Poland. He is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, is the faculty advisor for the Fortunoff Collection of Holocaust Testimonies at Yale, and sits on the advisory councils of the Yivo Institute for Jewish Research and other organizations.

20th Annual J.B. Rudnyckyj Distinguished Lecture: Dr. Timothy Snyder - Bloodlands

20th Annual J.B. Rudnyckyj Distinguished Lecture: Dr. Timothy Snyder - Bloodlands

A videorecording of the 20th Annual J.B. Rudnyckyj Distinguished Lecture held March 29, 2012 at the Moot Court, Robson Hall, University of Manitoba. The lecturer was Dr. Timothy Snyder, Professor of History at Yale University, whose lecture titled "Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin" reflected upon his research on the history of mass murders in central and eastern Europe between 1933 and 1945. Following his acclaimed book of the same title, Snyder disputes popular assumptions about victims of these events by presenting their story in a context of a region where Nazism and Soviet communism clashed. This approach takes these mass murders out of isolation and examines them beyond the traditional historical understanding of their causes. The lecture was sponsored by the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections, the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Toronto, the Elizabeth Dafoe Library's Slavic Collection, the University of Manitoba Department of German & Slavic Studies, and the Manitoba Branch of the Canadian Polish Congress. Videographer: James Kominowski

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