Yayoi Kusama – Obsessed with Polka Dots

Yayoi Kusama – Obsessed with Polka Dots

The nine decades of artist Yayoi Kusama’s life have taken her from rural Japan to the New York art scene to contemporary Tokyo, in a career in which she has continuously innovated and re-invented her style. Well-known for her repeating dot patterns, her art encompasses an astonishing variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance and immersive installation. It ranges from works on paper featuring intense semi-abstract imagery, to soft sculpture known as ‘Accumulations’, to her ‘Infinity Net’ paintings, made up of carefully repeated arcs of paint built up into large patterns. Since 1977 Kusama has lived voluntarily in a psychiatric institution, and much of her work has been marked with obsessiveness and a desire to escape from psychological trauma. In an attempt to share her experiences, she creates installations that immerse the viewer in her obsessive vision of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space. At the centre of the art world in the 1960s, she came into contact with artists including Donald Judd, Andy Warhol, Joseph Cornell and Claes Oldenburg, influencing many along the way. She has traded on her identity as an ‘outsider’ in many contexts – as a female artist in a male-dominated society, as a Japanese person in the Western art world, and as a victim of her own neurotic and obsessional symptoms. After achieving fame and notoriety with groundbreaking art happenings and events, she returned to her country of birth and is now Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist. Subscribe for weekly films: https://goo.gl/lNZDZY

Yayoi Kusama's Obliteration Room | TateShots

Yayoi Kusama's Obliteration Room | TateShots

Artist Yayoi Kusama's interactive Obliteration Room begins as an entirely white space, furnished as a monochrome living room, which people are then invited to 'obliterate' with multi-coloured stickers. Over the course of a few weeks the room was transformed from a blank canvas into an explosion of colour, with thousands of spots stuck over every available surface. TateShots produced this time-lapse video of the Obliteration Room covering the first few weeks of its presentation at Tate Modern in 2012. It was first conceived as a project for children, and was first staged at the Queensland Art Gallery in 2002. Find out more about Yayoi Kusama: https://goo.gl/aWbbK4 Subscribe for weekly films: https://goo.gl/lNZDZY ---- We are carrying out research to understand who is watching TateShots videos and how far they are meeting the interests of our audiences. By taking part, you will help us shape further online content. The survey should take no more than seven minutes to complete. Take the survey: https://goo.gl/tc0hdi Thank you.

Mabel x Tate Modern – Talk About Forever

Mabel x Tate Modern – Talk About Forever

Rising songwriter and artist Mabel has created a video project to commemorate the opening of the new Tate Modern building. The video is directed by acclaimed choreographer Holly Blakey (Florence & The Machine, Jessie Ware) and the song in the video is an original composition for the project created by Mabel specifically for this special collaboration. The video is reflective of Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment 1965, remade 2005 which is displayed within the new Tate Modern. The colourful, psychedelic patterns produced by light displays such as Metzger’s became icons of London’s cultural scene in the 1960s, as musicians in particular sought to create total sensory environments for the appreciation of their work. Visit the new Tate Modern from Friday 17 June 2016 – find out more: http://goo.gl/Gli1RZ Gustav Metzger's Liquid Crystal Environment 1965 is on display at Tate Modern: http://goo.gl/9yiAWZ Mabel's website: http://www.mabelofficial.com Subscribe for weekly films: http://goo.gl/X1ZnEl

Ai Weiwei – Sunflower Seeds

Ai Weiwei – Sunflower Seeds

Artist Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds is made up of millions of small works, each apparently identical, but actually unique. However realistic they may seem, these life-sized sunflower seed husks are in fact intricately hand-crafted in porcelain. Each seed has been individually sculpted and painted by specialists working in small-scale workshops in the Chinese city of Jingdezhen. Far from being industrially produced, they are the effort of hundreds of skilled hands. Poured into the interior of the Turbine Hall’s vast industrial space, the 100 million seeds form a seemingly infinite landscape. Porcelain is almost synonymous with China and, to make this work, Ai Weiwei has manipulated traditional methods of crafting what has historically been one of China’s most prized exports. Sunflower Seeds invites us to look more closely at the ‘Made in China’ phenomenon and the geo-politics of cultural and economic exchange today. Sunflower Seeds was on display at Tate Modern from 12 October 2010 – 2 May 2011. Find out more about Ai Weiwei: https://goo.gl/mUKYbS Subscribe for weekly films: https://goo.gl/lNZDZY

Restoring Rothko

Restoring Rothko

Filmed over 18 months, this is the story behind the restoration of Mark Rothko's 'Black on Maroon'. Mark Rothko's 'Black on Maroon' 1958 goes back on public view at Tate Modern on 13 May 2014, following 18 months of intensive work by the Conservation team and colleagues across Tate. The painting, one of the iconic Seagram murals which Rothko donated to Tate in 1970, was vandalised with graffiti ink in October 2012. It has since been the subject of detailed research and restoration by the core treatment team of Rachel Barker, Bronwyn Ormsby and Patricia Smithen. Over nine months the team researched methods for removing the ink from the delicate paint layers, using special test canvases to assess the appropriate solvents and cleaning methods. Rachel then spent a further nine months working on Black on Maroon itself, removing the majority of the surface ink before restoring the painting's surface. Subscribe for more art: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=tate

Jemima Kirke – Where Are the Women? | Unlock Art

Jemima Kirke – Where Are the Women? | Unlock Art

Girls actress Jemima Kirke (known as Jessa Johansson in the HBO series) addresses the topic of women in art (or the lack them). She looks at the changing role of female artists in a male dominated art world over the centuries - and how some of them eventually took on the establishment in the 1970s. So far in this series - part of Tate's quest to bring art to a wider audience - our video team has collaborated with the likes of Frank Skinner, Alan Cumming and Sally Phillips to bring you crash courses in Performance Art, Pop Art and Shopping for Art.   Other films coming up in the series include one on Surrealism presented by Peter Capaldi, aka Doctor Who!   Unlock Art is a collaboration between Tate and Le Méridien Hotels & Resorts. Le Méridien Unlock Art microsite: http://www.lemeridien.com/filmseries Unlock Art is supported by Le Méridien (http://Bit.ly/lm-unlockart) Subscribe for more art films: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=tate See more on the Tate website: http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/unlock-art#open286633

Exploring Surrealism with Peter Capaldi | Unlock Art

Exploring Surrealism with Peter Capaldi | Unlock Art

Need some help getting to grips with Surrealism? The Doctor will see you now. Peter Capaldi, a former art student, and the latest actor to play Doctor Who, settles down on Freud's couch to deliver his wry take on the Surrealist movement.    'Unlock Art' is Tate's new short film series, offering a witty inside track on the world of art.  Doctor Who actor Peter Capaldi joins forces with rock duo The Kills, comedian Frank Skinner, Girls star Jemima Kirke and other celebrity art fans to introduce some of the big ideas that have shaped art history. A new film is released each month, with topics ranging from the history of the nude and the nature of the art market, to Pop art.   Unlock Art is a collaboration between Tate and Le Méridien Hotels & Resorts. Le Méridien Unlock Artmicrosite: http://www.lemeridien.com/filmseries   As an ongoing supporter of Tate's work, Le Méridien also sponsors the Outset/Frieze Art Fair Fund to benefit the Tate collection, which enables Tate to buy work by emerging artists at Frieze London.   Unlock Art supported by Le Méridien.

Daido Moriyama – In Pictures

Daido Moriyama – In Pictures

Daido Moriyama uses an ordinary compact camera and never stops shooting. The artist is the most celebrated photographer to emerge from the Japanese Provoke movement of the 1960s. In this film Moriyama invites us into his studio and takes us on a walk around the atmospheric Shinjuku neighbourhood, his home from home in Tokyo. Moriyama's work was featured in the exhibition William Klein + Daido Moriyama at Tate Modern, 10 October 2012 - 20 January 2013. Find out more about Daido Moriyama: https://goo.gl/qUsU3a Subscribe for more artists: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=tate

David Salle – 'Good Painting Has Immediate Impact' | TateShots

David Salle – 'Good Painting Has Immediate Impact' | TateShots

'A good painting', says American artist David Salle, 'has immediate impact, but rewards a longer viewing time'. From his New York studio David Salle talks about the combination of images and pictorial languages that go into one of his multi-layered paintings; and explains how his interest in exploring the body in space has led him to paint the bodies of his models and have them physically lifted onto his canvases to leave an imprint.

Zaha Hadid and Suprematism | Tate Talks

Zaha Hadid and Suprematism | Tate Talks

A discussion between multiple award-winning architect Zaha Hadid and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Head of Exhibitions at Tate Modern and curator of Malevich exhibition. Considering Hadid’s concept of architecture and its relationship to space and the city, this conversation reflects on Malevich’s Architektons, as well as other works of Suprematism, as formative inspiration for her own practice. The volumetric compositions of Suprematism such as Architektons were utilised to create new possibilities for interior space, while Malevich experimented with these constructions as means for social transformation through radical architectural form. The novelty, purity and originality of these works fostered a new psychology of perception in both art and architecture. The link between Zaha Hadid and Suprematism has spanned her entire career, beginning with her 1976-77 graduation thesis for the Architectural Association, Malevich’s Tecktonik, which takes a visually deconstructed influence from Malevich and uses it as the starting point for a fourteen-level London hotel concept design. Following this interest, in 1993 Zaha Hadid was asked by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York to create an exhibition design for their encyclopaedic show of the Russian Avant-Garde, The Great Utopia. Hadid continues to demonstrate her relationship to Suprematism, recently designing and curating an exhibition at Galerie Gmurzynska Zurich that juxtaposed her own work with early twentieth-century Russian art pieces. This event is related to the exhibition Malevich at Tate Modern 16 July – 26 October 2014 http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/malevich Subscribe for more talks: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=tate

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