Hero Worship - Phantom Lady

Hero Worship - Phantom Lady

One of our older comic women is Phantom Lady, who appeared in Police Comics in 1941. Busty and barely dressed, she set the stage for later sexy superheroes. Her alter ego was Sandra Knight and she switched from a skimpy blue outfit to a skimpy yellow outfit while appearing in early comics. After early appearances for Fox Features, Ajax Farrell Publications, and Charlton Comics, she was acquired by and went to work for DC Comics in 1956. Later she became Delilah Tyler (1989), and then Stormy Knight (2006). Music is Franz Schubert's "Ständchen."

Phantom Lady Tribute

Phantom Lady Tribute

Sandra Knight is the original Phantom Lady and one of the first female superheroes of the Golden Age. She is also a founding member of the Freedom Fighters. In 1989, Sandra retired from crime-fighting and bequeathed the Phantom Lady role and costume to her protégé, Dee Tyler. Delilah "Dee" Tyler was the second Phantom Lady. She succeeded the original Phantom Lady (Sandra Knight) in 1989 and received special training from Sandra personally. In 2005, Dee was killed during Infinite Crisis and succeeded by Stormy Knight. Stormy Knight is the third woman to assume the time-honored role of Phantom Lady. As with the previous two Phantom Ladies, she is a member of the Freedom Fighters. Jennifer Knight is the fourth and newest character to don the mantle. When she was just a girl, her parents were murdered by the Bloody Benders crime family. After being equipped with high-tech gauntlets that gave her darkness-based powers, Jennifer took the classic role of Phantom Lady in order to bring the Bloody Benders to justice. Song By: Red Hot Chili Peppers - She Looks To Me

Phantom Lady: "The Tank Factory Sabotage', Police Comics #12 - Untimed

Phantom Lady: "The Tank Factory Sabotage', Police Comics #12 - Untimed

Phantom Lady first appeared in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug, 1941), an anthology title the first issue of which also included the debut of characters such as Plastic Man and the Human Bomb. That issue established her alter ego as Sandra Knight, the beautiful Washington, D.C. debutante daughter of U.S. Senator Henry Knight. The issue established that it was not her first appearance as the Phantom Lady, but it did not go into her origin. Stories published decades later by DC Comics would give her a proper origin, which was altered several times to give Sandra a more active role. Her skimpy costume was eventually explained as a deliberate tactic to distract her usually male foes. Sandra Knight assumed the identity of Phantom Lady in a costume consisting of a green cape and the equivalent of a one-piece yellow swimsuit. She used a "black light projector," a device which allowed her to blind her enemies and make herself invisible. She drove a car whose headlights also projected black light when necessary. She was sometimes assisted by her fiance, Donald Borden, an agent of the U.S. State Department.

Phantom Lady: Police Comics #13 - "The Phony Phantom Lady"

Phantom Lady: Police Comics #13 - "The Phony Phantom Lady"

Phantom Lady first appeared in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug, 1941), an anthology title the first issue of which also included the debut of characters such as Plastic Man and the Human Bomb. That issue established her alter ego as Sandra Knight, the beautiful Washington, D.C. debutante daughter of U.S. Senator Henry Knight. The issue established that it was not her first appearance as the Phantom Lady, but it did not go into her origin. Stories published decades later by DC Comics would give her a proper origin, which was altered several times to give Sandra a more active role. Her skimpy costume was eventually explained as a deliberate tactic to distract her usually male foes. Sandra Knight assumed the identity of Phantom Lady in a costume consisting of a green cape and the equivalent of a one-piece yellow swimsuit. She used a "black light projector," a device which allowed her to blind her enemies and make herself invisible. She drove a car whose headlights also projected black light when necessary. She was sometimes assisted by her fiance, Donald Borden, an agent of the U.S. State Department. Phantom Lady ran as one of the features in Police Comics through #23. Arthur Peddy continued as the artist through #13, with Joe Kubert drawing her feature in Police Comics #14-16; Frank Borth on #17-21; Arthur Peddy returned for #22,; and Rudy Palais on #23. Phantom Lady also appeared in Feature Comics #69-71 as part of a crossover with Spider Widow and the Raven.

Inherent Vice - I Need Your Help, Doc

Inherent Vice - I Need Your Help, Doc

Own #InherentVice on Digital HD now or Blu-ray™ 4/28 When private eye Doc Sportello’s ex-old lady suddenly out of nowhere shows up with a story about her current billionaire land developer boyfriend whom she just happens to be in love with, and a plot by his wife and her boyfriend to kidnap that billionaire and throw him in a loony bin…well, easy for her to say. Like Inherent Vice on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/InherentViceMovie Like Warner Bros. Entertainment on Facebook http://on.fb.me/WBEntFB Follow Warner Bros. Entertainment on Twitter https://twitter.com/WBHomeEnt Follow Inherent Vice on Twitter https://twitter.com/SeeInherentVice Follow Warner Bros. Entertainment on Instagram http://instagram.com/warnerbrosentertainment

Phantom Lady: "The Kidnapped Ambassador", Police Comics vol 1 #02

Phantom Lady: "The Kidnapped Ambassador", Police Comics vol 1 #02

Phantom Lady first appeared in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug, 1941), an anthology title the first issue of which also included the debut of characters such as Plastic Man and the Human Bomb. That issue established her alter ego as Sandra Knight, the beautiful Washington, D.C. debutante daughter of U.S. Senator Henry Knight. The issue established that it was not her first appearance as the Phantom Lady, but it did not go into her origin. Stories published decades later by DC Comics would give her a proper origin, which was altered several times to give Sandra a more active role. Her skimpy costume was eventually explained as a deliberate tactic to distract her usually male foes.

Phantom Lady: "The Dirigible of Doom", Police Comics vol 1 #04

Phantom Lady: "The Dirigible of Doom", Police Comics vol 1 #04

Phantom Lady first appeared in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug, 1941), an anthology title the first issue of which also included the debut of characters such as Plastic Man and the Human Bomb. That issue established her alter ego as Sandra Knight, the beautiful Washington, D.C. debutante daughter of U.S. Senator Henry Knight. The issue established that it was not her first appearance as the Phantom Lady, but it did not go into her origin. Stories published decades later by DC Comics would give her a proper origin, which was altered several times to give Sandra a more active role. Her skimpy costume was eventually explained as a deliberate tactic to distract her usually male foes.

Phantom Lady: vol 1 #13, "Knights Of The Crooked Cross"

Phantom Lady: vol 1 #13, "Knights Of The Crooked Cross"

Phantom Lady first appeared in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug, 1941), an anthology title the first issue of which also included the debut of characters such as Plastic Man and the Human Bomb. That issue established her alter ego as Sandra Knight, the beautiful Washington, D.C. debutante daughter of U.S. Senator Henry Knight. The issue established that it was not her first appearance as the Phantom Lady, but it did not go into her origin. Stories published decades later by DC Comics would give her a proper origin, which was altered several times to give Sandra a more active role. Her skimpy costume was eventually explained as a deliberate tactic to distract her usually male foes.

Merlin The Witch's Aria

Merlin The Witch's Aria

Merlin The Witch's Aria

Phantom Lady: Police Comics # 08 "Chaos In Cuba"

Phantom Lady: Police Comics # 08 "Chaos In Cuba"

Phantom Lady first appeared in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug, 1941), an anthology title the first issue of which also included the debut of characters such as Plastic Man and the Human Bomb. That issue established her alter ego as Sandra Knight, the beautiful Washington, D.C. debutante daughter of U.S. Senator Henry Knight. The issue established that it was not her first appearance as the Phantom Lady, but it did not go into her origin. Stories published decades later by DC Comics would give her a proper origin, which was altered several times to give Sandra a more active role. Her skimpy costume was eventually explained as a deliberate tactic to distract her usually male foes. Sandra Knight assumed the identity of Phantom Lady in a costume consisting of a green cape and the equivalent of a one-piece yellow swimsuit. She used a "black light projector," a device which allowed her to blind her enemies and make herself invisible. She drove a car whose headlights also projected black light when necessary. She was sometimes assisted by her fiance, Donald Borden, an agent of the U.S. State Department. Phantom Lady ran as one of the features in Police Comics through #23. Arthur Peddy continued as the artist through #13, with Joe Kubert drawing her feature in Police Comics #14-16; Frank Borth on #17-21; Arthur Peddy returned for #22,; and Rudy Palais on #23. Phantom Lady also appeared in Feature Comics #69-71 as part of a crossover with Spider Widow and the Raven.

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