RA5C VIGILANTE AIRCRAFT Aboard the USS Ranger (silent film) VIETNAM ERA 80350

RA5C VIGILANTE AIRCRAFT Aboard the USS Ranger (silent film) VIETNAM ERA 80350

USS Ranger CVA 61 RA-5C Vigilante 1964 Vietnam. The RA-5C was a Mach 2+ aircraft, capable of electromagnetic, optical, and electronic reconnaissance. It could operate at altitudes from sea level to above 50,000 feet. The Vigilante was employed to great effect by the 7th fleet during Carrier Air Wing operations in the Vietnam war. The two man crew flew in tandem in twin cockpits, the pilot in front, and the Reconnaissance Attack Navigator, in the rear This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

Aircraft Carrier Crash Landing: Vought F7U Cutlass on USS Hancock 1955 US Navy; JQ Music

Aircraft Carrier Crash Landing: Vought F7U Cutlass on USS Hancock 1955 US Navy; JQ Music

Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net Massive crash landing of a Vought F7U Cutlass on the USS Hancock. First three good landings are shown. Then a Cutlass misses all of the wires and runs into the barricade, breaking its landing gear in the process. After that another Cutlass snaps its right wheel off while landing. Finally, on 14 July 1955, the sixth Cutlass, aircraft 412, veers off the left side of the deck and explodes into flames. The pilot, Lieutenant Commander Jay T. Alkire, was killed in the crash; several deck crew were injured. Two views are shown of each of the mishap landings. Originally a public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vought_F7U_Cutlass Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The Vought F7U Cutlass was a United States Navy carrier-based jet fighter and fighter-bomber of the early Cold War era. It was a highly unusual, semi-tailless design, allegedly based on aerodynamic data and plans captured from the German Arado company at the end of World War II, though Vought designers denied any link to the German research at the time. The F7U was the last aircraft designed by Rex Beisel, who was responsible for the first fighter ever designed specifically for the U.S. Navy, the Curtiss TS-1 of 1922. Regarded as a radical departure from traditional aircraft design, the Cutlass suffered from numerous technical and handling problems throughout its short service career. The type was responsible for the deaths of four test pilots and 21 other U.S. Navy pilots. Over one quarter of all Cutlasses built were destroyed in accidents. The poor safety record was largely the result of the advanced design built to apply new aerodynamic theories and insufficiently powerful, unreliable engines... Three prototypes were ordered in 1946, with the first example flying on 29 September 1948, piloted by Vought's Chief Test Pilot, J. Robert Baker. The maiden flight took place from Naval Air Station Patuxent River and was not without its problems. During testing one of the prototypes reached a maximum speed of 625 mph (1,058 km/h)[7] Production orders were placed for the F7U-1 in a specification very close to the prototypes, and further developed F7U-2 and F7U-3 versions with more powerful engines. Because of development problems with the powerplant, however, the F7U-2 would never be built, while the F7U-3 would incorporate many refinements suggested by tests of the -1. The first 16 F7U-3s had non-afterburning Allison J35-29 engines. The -3, with its Westinghouse J46-WE-8B turbojets, would eventually become the definitive production version, with 288 aircraft equipping 13 U.S. Navy squadrons. Further development stopped once the Vought F8U Crusader flew. The F7U's performance suffered due to a lack of sufficient engine thrust; consequently, its carrier landing and takeoff performance was notoriously poor. The J35 was known to flame out in rain, a very serious fault... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Hancock_(CV-19) USS Hancock (CV/CVA-19) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II for the United States Navy. The ship was the fourth US Navy ship to bear the name, and was named for John Hancock, president of the Second Continental Congress and first governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Hancock was commissioned in April 1944, and served in several campaigns in the Pacific Theater of Operations, earning four battle stars. Decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, she was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA). In her second career she operated exclusively in the Pacific, playing a prominent role in the Vietnam War, for which she earned a Navy Unit Commendation. She was the first US Navy carrier to have steam catapults installed. She was decommissioned in early 1976, and sold for scrap later that year...

Aircraft Familiarization in the A3J Vigilante Operating Procedures

Aircraft Familiarization in the A3J Vigilante Operating Procedures

GRUMMAN F6F HELLCAT FIGHTER AIRCRAFT PRODUCTION LINE 1944 PROMOTIONAL FILM 80304

GRUMMAN F6F HELLCAT FIGHTER AIRCRAFT PRODUCTION LINE 1944 PROMOTIONAL FILM 80304

Produced in 1944 by Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, GRUMMAN AT WAR shows the company in full swing as part of the WWII production effort. The film was released along with a companion book to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the company's founding. By the time it was made, production of the Wildcat and Avenger had been taken over by the Eastern Aircraft Division of General Motors Corporation, under their FM and TBM designations, to allow Grumman to concentrate on production of the F6F Hellcat, the star of this film. The film was produced by the Princeton Film Center and produced by Leroy G. Phelps and Gordon Knox and directed by Robert Elwyn. The Grumman F6F Hellcat is an American carrier-based fighter aircraft of World War II. Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War. The Hellcat competed with the faster Vought F4U Corsair for that role and prevailed, as the Corsair had significant issues with carrier landings. The Corsair instead was primarily deployed to great effect in land-based use by the U.S. Marine Corps. Powered by a 2,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters, the F6F was an entirely new design, but it still resembled the Wildcat in many ways. Some military observers tagged the Hellcat as the "Wildcat's big brother". The F6F was best known for its role as a rugged, well-designed carrier fighter which was able, after its combat debut in September 1943, to outperform the A6M Zero and help secure air superiority over the Pacific Theater. 12,275 were built in just over two years. Hellcats were credited with destroying a total of 5,223 enemy aircraft while in service with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm.This was more than any other Allied naval aircraft. Postwar, the Hellcat was phased out of front line service but remained in service as late as 1954 as a night fighter. Incidentally, in the opening sequences, an aircraft is shown that is the "first F6F ever made", but in reality that moniker would be more appropriate for the XF6F-1, which had it's first flight on June 26, 1942. The "stand-in" Hellcat shown is probably an F6F-3 in Test Department markings. The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, later Grumman Aerospace Corporation, was a leading 20th century U.S. producer of military and civilian aircraft. Founded on December 6, 1929, by Leroy Grumman and partners, its independent existence ended in 1994 when it was acquired by Northrop Corporation to form Northrop Grumman. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

USS Kitty Hawk '70-'71 Cruise (launch/recovery)

USS Kitty Hawk '70-'71 Cruise (launch/recovery)

Edited film from USS Kitty Hawk deployment 1970-71: excerpts from full 36 min. home-made movie by John Blandford, VA-195 pilot. Launch and recovery during combat operations.

"Crew Chief Door Gunner UH-1D" 1967 US Army; Vietnam War Shotgun Rider Raw Footage

"Crew Chief Door Gunner UH-1D" 1967 US Army; Vietnam War Shotgun Rider Raw Footage

Vietnam War playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF7FC7A2D880623F7 more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html Riding aboard UH-1 Hueys on May 26, 1967, along with the helicopter door gunner, (shotgun rider) other helicopter crew and passengers in Vietnam. 'Covers airlift of troops and cargo to and from combat area and role of gunship by UH-1Ds of the 68th Assault Helicopter Company, 145th Combat Aviation Battalion, in support of ground operations near Bien Hoa AB. (Note: Crew chief serves as right door gunner.) Note: This film footage is silent Shot List: 1) Scenes aboard USA UH-1D showing gunners with M-60 machine guns at doors; redeployment of USA troops from rice paddies to rice paddies; troops aboard helicopter; evacuation of wounded Vietnamese civilians to aid station; and pilot and copilot at controls. 2) AV's of rice paddies, villages, tent city, engine storage area, and smoke grenades burning in landing zone; USA UH-1D's in flight, landing, and taking off from rice paddies; firing passes at huts; and formation of ten USA UH-1D's in flight as seen from USA UH-1D. 3) Wounded Vietnamese civilians being loaded aboard USA UH-1D, being removed from helicopter at aid station, ammunition crates being loaded aboard helicopter, and USA UH-1D's parked on elevated ground in paddies. 4) MS of USA UH-1D rotor hub starting.' also see: Shotgun Rider (The Big Picture) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mW40yWJyV30 Originally a public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Door_gunner Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ A door gunner is a crewman tasked with firing and maintaining manually directed armament aboard a helicopter. The actual role will vary depending on the task given on a particular mission... The role of "Door Gunner" originated during the Vietnam War, when helicopters were first used in combat in large numbers. The original personnel who served as early Door Gunners aboard CH-21, UH-34, and UH-1 helicopters in Vietnam, were enlisted men, with a designated and specially trained 'Crew Chief' serving as both the aircraft's maintenance manager and a Door Gunner. And normally, a second enlisted Soldier served as a second Door Gunner (such as on a UH-1, and UH-34, which both used two gunners (one on each side of the aircraft))... For the majority of the Vietnam War, the principal weapon of the Door Gunner in Vietnam was a Medium Machine Gun (MG), initially, a M-1919A4 .30 Caliber MG, and soon thereafter, the M-60 7.62mm MG became the standard helicopter door armament system... some helicopters were not armed with a door MG, and the Door Gunners thus carried an M1 Carbine, or an M14 rifle, as the sole door weapon.) Initially, the Door Gunner's MG weapons were mounted on swiveling mounts (on a pintle mount) in order to retain and steady the door armament weapon, which was usually an M60 machine gun. As the War progressed, using bungee cords to suspend/retain the MG weapons became a common practice for Door Gunners... some Door Gunners simply did not use any retention device with their MG weapons... and instead, they simply hand-held the weapon for a maximum level of maneuverability of fire. This practice was commonly termed as using a "Free 60"... Door Gunners were normally restrained for safety within the aircraft, by either using a standard seat lap belt, or if the Gunner wanted freedom of movement within the aircraft while still being retained, he used a "Monkey Harness"... The Door Gunner position was not a particularly popular one, due to the inherent vulnerability of manning a machine gun in the open door of a helicopter. According to popular legend, the door gunner on a Vietnam era Huey gun ship had a life-span of 5 minutes... Today, helicopters like the UH-60 have two machine guns firing out of two windows located behind the pilots. The CH-46, CH-47 and CH-53 have an additional gun that is fired from the rear ramp. The UH-1 (still in use by the U.S. Marine Corps) is still manned as it was in the Vietnam War, actually firing from an open cabin door... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UH-1 The Bell UH-1 Iroquois is a military helicopter powered by a single, turboshaft engine, with a two-bladed main rotor and tail rotor. The helicopter... first flew on 20 October 1956. Ordered into production in March 1960... more than 16,000 have been produced worldwide. The first combat operation of the UH-1 was in the service of the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. The original designation of HU-1 led to the helicopter's nickname of Huey...

US F3D Skyknights lands on the deck of USS Hancock CV-19 in the Pacific Ocean dur...HD Stock Footage

US F3D Skyknights lands on the deck of USS Hancock CV-19 in the Pacific Ocean dur...HD Stock Footage

Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675055335_United-States-F3D-Skyknight_USS-Hancock-CV-19_Project-Steam-Catapult_men-stands-on-deck Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. US F3D Skyknights lands on the deck of USS Hancock CV-19 in the Pacific Ocean during Project Steam Catapult. Deck activity aboard USS Hancock CV-19 in the Pacific Ocean during Project Steam Catapult. US F3D Skyknights lands on the deck of USS Hancock CV-19 in the Pacific Ocean. Few men stand on the deck. Few men run across the deck. Location: Pacific Ocean. Date: September 15, 1954. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.

De HAVILLAND HYDROMATIC AIRSCREW PROPELLER AIRCRAFT BRITISH EDUCATIONAL FILM 75764

De HAVILLAND HYDROMATIC AIRSCREW PROPELLER AIRCRAFT  BRITISH EDUCATIONAL FILM 75764

This British film describes the De Havilland Hydromatic Airscrew, produced under license from Hamilton Standard. The Hydromatic propeller represented a major advance in propeller design and laid the groundwork for further advancements in propulsion over the next 50 years. The Hydromatic was designed to accommodate larger blades for increased thrust, and provide a faster rate of pitch change and a wider range of pitch control. This propeller utilized high-pressure oil, applied to both sides of the actuating piston, for pitch control as well as feathering— the act of stopping propeller rotation on a non-functioningengine to reduce drag and vibration — allowing multienginedaircraft to safely continue flight on remaining engine(s).The Hydromatic entered production in the late 1930s, just in time to meet the requirements of the high-performance military and transport aircraft of World War II. The propeller’s performance, durability and reliability made amajor contribution to the successful efforts of the U.S. and Allied air forces. The variable-pitch aircraft propeller allows the adjustment in flight of blade pitch, making optimal use of the engine’spower under varying flight conditions. On multi-engine daircraft it also permits feathering the propeller--stopping its rotation--of a nonfunctioning engine to reduce drag andvibration.The Hydromatic propeller was designed for larger blades,faster rate of pitch change, and wider range of pitch control than earlier types of controllable-pitch propellers. The Hydromatic played a distinguished role in allied combataircraft in World War II. Its continuing development hasincorporated many features used on later aircraft, including today’s turboprop planes. By the end of the war in 1945, Hamilton Standard and its licensees had supplied more than 500,000 propellers, more than half of them Hydromatics, to U.S. and Allied military forces.The development of the feathering feature led tounexpected gains in another Hydromatic subsystem —deicing. Various methods of removing ice from propellersto reduce vibration and maintain blade efficiency were employed beginning in 1935. One early method commonly used among airlines involved spraying a combination ofalcohol and glycerine through nozzles to the propeller’sblades. Aided by centrifugal force, the loosened ice would then be ejected. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

McNallyTV: U.S. Marine Captain Rand McNally "Atlas" crash lands on USS Ranger

McNallyTV:  U.S. Marine Captain Rand McNally "Atlas" crash lands on USS Ranger

During a storm in the Pacific Ocean, Atlas was down one set of landing gear. The rest of the squadron went and landed on a nearby island due to the storm, Atlas, had to dump his fuel and had one chance to land into the net. This is a great tribute to Bug Roach (Bug can be heard on the audio calmly talking the pilot down to the aircraft carrier) and his contribution to Naval Aviation. Footage is from March 9, 1987.

A-4F Skyhawk Blue Angels & T-38A Talon Thunder Birds

A-4F Skyhawk Blue Angels & T-38A Talon Thunder Birds

An old video edited in Japan. A-4FスカイホークのブルーエンジェルズとT-38Aタロンのサンダーバーズの動画です。 海軍と空軍の違いというか、スタイルの違いがおもしろいですね。

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