Příběh kriminálního rady (1994)avi & Příbuzenstvo krimi Československo 1979.mp4

Příběh kriminálního rady (1994)avi & Příbuzenstvo krimi Československo 1979.mp4

Smrt talentovaného ševce krimi Československo 1982 & Smrt z laboratoře krimi psycho 1987.mp4. Příběh kriminálního rady (1994)avi & Příbuzenstvo krimi Československo 1979.mp4. Ptáček Československo Krimi 1969 & Půl domu bez ženicha Komedie Československo 1980.mp4. Násilník komedie Československo 1982 & Návrat Idiota (El retorno del idiota) - Saša Gedeon - (Su.mp4. Nevesta k zulibani komedie 1980 & Neviditelné nebezpečí drama 1982.mp4.

{new} ta chvile ten okamzik drama Válečný Československo 1981

{new} ta chvile ten okamzik  drama Válečný Československo  1981

Bláznivá komedie 2 HQ

Bláznivá komedie 2 HQ

Vyhledávejte mě pod: Ondra Javůrek

V podstate jsme normalni

V podstate jsme normalni

Můj brácha má prima bráchu komedie Československo 1975

Můj brácha má prima bráchu komedie Československo 1975

Žena za pultem 6 Vítězství prodavačky Kaláškové

Žena za pultem 6   Vítězství prodavačky Kaláškové

{new} Ráno budeme moudřejší Drama Československo 1977

{new} Ráno budeme moudřejší Drama Československo 1977

Suspense: Stand-In / Dead of Night / Phobia

Suspense: Stand-In / Dead of Night / Phobia

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Carl Sandburg's 79th Birthday / No Time for Heartaches / Fire at Malibu

Carl Sandburg's 79th Birthday / No Time for Heartaches / Fire at Malibu

Carl Sandburg (January 6, 1878 -- July 22, 1967) was an American writer and editor, best known for his poetry. He was the recipient of three Pulitzer Prizes: two for his poetry and another for his biography of Abraham Lincoln. H. L. Mencken called Sandburg "indubitably an American in every pulse-beat". Sandburg was born in the three-room cottage at 313 East Third Street in Galesburg, Illinois, to parents of Swedish ancestry. At the age of thirteen he left school and began driving a milk wagon. From the age of about fourteen until he was seventeen or eighteen, he worked as a porter at the Union Hotel barbershop in Galesburg.[1] After that he was on the milk route again for eighteen months. He then became a bricklayer and a farm laborer on the wheat plains of Kansas.[2] After an interval spent at Lombard College in Galesburg,[3] he became a hotel servant in Denver, then a coal-heaver in Omaha. He began his writing career as a journalist for the Chicago Daily News. Later he wrote poetry, history, biographies, novels, children's literature, and film reviews. Sandburg also collected and edited books of ballads and folklore. He spent most of his life in the Midwest before moving to North Carolina. Sandburg volunteered to go to the military and was stationed in Puerto Rico with the 6th Illinois Infantry during the Spanish--American War, disembarking at Guánica, Puerto Rico on July 25, 1898. Sandburg was never actually called to battle. He attended West Point for just two weeks, before failing a mathematics and grammar exam. Sandburg returned to Galesburg and entered Lombard College, but left without a degree in 1903. He moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and joined the Social Democratic Party, the name by which the Socialist Party of America was known in the state. Sandburg served as a secretary to Emil Seidel, socialist mayor of Milwaukee from 1910 to 1912. Sandburg met Lilian Steichen at the Social Democratic Party office in 1907, and they married the next year. Lilian's brother was the photographer Edward Steichen. Sandburg with his wife, whom he called Paula, raised three daughters. The Sandburgs moved to Harbert, Michigan, and then to suburban Chicago, Illinois. They lived in Evanston, Illinois, before settling at 331 S. York Street in Elmhurst, Illinois, from 1919 to 1930. Sandburg wrote three children's books in Elmhurst, Rootabaga Stories, in 1922, followed by Rootabaga Pigeons (1923), and Potato Face (1930). Sandburg also wrote Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years, a two-volume biography in 1926, The American Songbag (1927), and a book of poems called Good Morning, America (1928) in Elmhurst. The family moved to Michigan in 1930. The Sandburg house at 331 W. York Street, Elmhurst was demolished and the site is now a parking lot. Sandburg's collection, The War Years was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1940. His Complete Poems won him a second Pulitzer Prize in 1951.[4] In 1945 he moved to Connemara, a 246-acre rural estate in Flat Rock, North Carolina. Here he produced a little over a third of his total published work, and lived with his wife, daughters, and two grandchildren until dying of natural causes in 1967. Sandburg had his ashes interred under "Remembrance Rock", a 5-foot-high granite boulder located behind his birth house.[5][6] Sandburg supported the civil rights movement, and contributed to the NAACP. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Sandburg

{new} Chemik komedie 1982

{new} Chemik komedie 1982

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