Time period of a pendulum depends on its length | Oscillation| Physics

Time period of a pendulum depends on its length | Oscillation| Physics

String up a pendulum, move the bob to one side and let go to set the pendulum into oscillations. Use a stopwatch to measure the time the pendulum takes to complete ten oscillations. Diving this time by 10 gives us the period of the pendulum i.e. the time taken to undergo one oscillation. Decrease the pendulum's length and repeat the above to get the new time period. We see that as the length becomes shorter, the time period decreases. This shows us that the length of a pendulum and its time period are related

Potential and Kinetic Energy for Kids

Potential and Kinetic Energy for Kids

Potential and Kinetic Energy. The law of conservation of energy. Energy cannot be created. Energy cannot be destroyed. It can only be converted from one form to another. The unit of energy is joules. The formula for potential energy is mgh, M is equal to Mass, g is equal to gravitational acceleration and h is equal to height. When we fall, potential energy starts getting converted to kinetic energy. Just before we land, all potential energy gets conveerted to kinetic energy. To calculate kinetic energy, kinetic energy is equal to 1 upon 2 into m into v square, where m is equal to mass and v is equal to velocity. Subscribe to our YouTube channel: Smart Learning for All.

The Pendulum and Galileo

The Pendulum and Galileo

Purchase: http://hilaroad.com/video/ Galileo's investigation of the pendulum played a role in the evolution of science. He performed some of the first experiments while discovering the relationship among length, mass and displacement. If you are teaching the scientific method, the pendulum is a good project to start with. Galileo probably gained insight into many issues around motion from his investigation of the pendulum. The video also mentions issues with the church and academia.

Work, Energy, and Power: Crash Course Physics #9

Work, Energy, and Power: Crash Course Physics #9

When you hear the word, "Work," what is the first thing you think of? Maybe sitting at a desk? Maybe plowing a field? Maybe working out? Work is a word that has a little bit of a different meaning in Physics and today, Shini is going to walk us through it. Also, Energy and Power! -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

Meet Galileo Galilei

Meet Galileo Galilei

Meet Galileo Galilei, hailed as the ‘father’ of modern observational astronomy, in our great free video. This video is packed full of facts and information about Galileo and is an entertaining resource to help children describe how a significant individual has influenced the UK and wider world. It's just one of over 1000 resources available on The Hub, our online portal for schools using Cornerstones. For more information, click here: https://cornerstoneseducation.co.uk/products/the-hub/

Pendulum Waves

Pendulum Waves

Fifteen uncoupled simple pendulums of monotonically increasing lengths dance together to produce visual traveling waves, standing waves, beating, and (seemingly) random motion. For more details see http://sciencedemonstrations.fas.harvard.edu/presentations/pendulum-waves The period of one complete cycle of the dance is 60 seconds. The length of the longest pendulum has been adjusted so that it executes 51 oscillations in this 60 second period. The length of each successive shorter pendulum is carefully adjusted so that it executes one additional oscillation in this period. Thus, the 15th pendulum (shortest) undergoes 65 oscillations. Our apparatus was built from a design published by Richard Berg [Am J Phys 59(2), 186-187 (1991)] at the University of Maryland. The particular apparatus shown here was built by our own Nils Sorensen. Video courtesy of Harvard Natural Sciences Lecture Demonstrations, © 2010 President and Fellows of Harvard College

9 Awesome Science Tricks Using Static Electricity!

9 Awesome Science Tricks Using Static Electricity!

Add me on Facebook. (click the LIKE button on Facebook to add me) http://www.facebook.com/brusspup Music in the video are songs I created. Song #1: Over Rain iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/over-rain-single/id1033695238 Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Over-Rain-brusspup/dp/B014JXPNSW/ Song #2 Soul Switch Remix - Will be available soon All of these tricks take advantage of static electricity. In general, the lower the humidity, the better these tricks will work. The most impressive one to me is the floating bag trick. Depending on the conditions, you can float an entire grocery sack. 1. Hover Plate: (You need Styrofoam Plates and a cloth) Styrofoam plates are great for static electricity tricks. When you give them a charge and hold one above the other, you can feel an incredible amount of resistance. 2. Can Can Go (You need a coke can, PVC pipe and a cloth) This is a classic but still fun. Try standing the can up and then tip it over with static, or try pulling 2 cans at the same time. 3. Stick Around (You need a small wooden stick, glass jar, thread, tape, PVC pipe and a cloth) This one is fun because half of the time the wooden stick will come toward the pvc pipe, and other times it will move away from the pipe. When it moves away, it will stick the the side of the jar and remain there for a period of time. It also fun to use as large a jar as possible to increase the dramatic effect of the pipe moving the stick from such a large distance. 4. Bubble Trouble (You need bubble solution, plexi-glass, PVC pipe, straw and a cloth. This is a fun trick because the bubbles change their shape and move when the pvc pipe is near. It's also fun to create bubbles inside of bubbles to watch the effect of the static electricity. And also create multiple bubbles on the sheet and watch them all travel toward the pipe. 5. Dancing Balls (You need styrofoam balls, aluminum foil, plexi-glass, cloth, and an area to keep the balls from escaping. This trick is really impressive but can be a bit difficult to recreate. When the plexi-glass plate is charged and placed over the balls, they all jump up and stick to the bottom of the glass. For a few moments they travel around sporadically until they finally settle. But when you put your finger near the glass, they all start jumping around. It's also fun to use these balls with styrofoam plates / cups. If you place the ball on a charged plate, it will shoot off of the plate, or stick to it, even if the plate is held sideways or upside down. 6. Water Bender (You need a cup that you can poke a hole in, water, PVC pipe and a cloth. This is a classic but still fun. 7. Balloon Fight (You need balloons, thread, PVC pipe and cloth. When the conditions are just right, the balloon can almost levitate about the pipe. But most of the time you can have fun pushing the balloons around with the charged pipe. 8. Electroscope (You need, steel wire, jar, straw, aluminum foil, PVC pipe and a cloth) This one is really impressive to see in person. A really cool effect to try, which you can see in this video, is to rub the cloth on the pvc pipe from several feet away from the jar. When you run the pipe, you can see the aluminum foil pieces in the jar, moving. I was able to stand as far as 5 feet away and still see the effect. 9. Wingardium Leviosa (You need very light weight / thin plastic bags, cloth, PVC pipe) This is my favorite trick. Again, with the correct conditions, you can get the plastic pieces to float over foot above the pipe. Produce bags from the grocery store work great. You can float an entire produce bag in the right conditions. Have fun!

Simple Pendulum

Simple Pendulum

Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://www.tutorvista.com/content/physics/physics-i/measurement-and-experimentation/simple-pendulum.php Simple Pendulum A simple pendulum that consists of a mass less and inelastic thread whose one end is fixed to a rigid support and a small bob of mass m which is suspended from the other end of the thread. Let l be the length of the pendulum, When the bob is slightly displaced and released, it oscillates about its equilibrium position. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista

Dartmouth Professor Discusses Foucault's Pendulum

Dartmouth Professor Discusses Foucault's Pendulum

Physics and astronomy professor Jim LaBelle discusses the science behind a classic physics experiment, Foucault's pendulum, while seated next to Dartmouth's pendulum in Fairchild Tower. Stay Connected to Dartmouth on: Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/Dartmouth Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/Dartmouth Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/Dartmouthflickr Google + - http://plus.google.com/+Dartmouth Instagram - http://instagram.com/DartmouthCollege

Coffee Cup Pendulum - Cool Science Experiment

Coffee Cup Pendulum - Cool Science Experiment

Learn more at http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/content/science-video/the-coffee-cup-pendulum There's a strong possibility that Steve Spangler's swinging table tricks might come to a crashing halt. It's a test of Steve's scientific skill and Mark's quick reflexes. Grab a coffee cup and a spoon and prepare to amaze your dinner guests. About Steve Spangler Science... Steve Spangler is a celebrity teacher, science toy designer, speaker, author and an Emmy award-winning television personality. Spangler is probably best known for his Mentos and Diet Coke geyser experiment that went viral in. Spangler is the founder of www.SteveSpanglerScience.com, a Denver-based company specializing in the creation of science toys, classroom science demonstrations, teacher resources and home for Spangler's popular science experiment archive and video collection. Spangler is a frequent guest on the Ellen DeGeneres Show and Denver 9 News where he takes classroom science experiments to the extreme. For teachers, parents or DIY Science ideas – check out other sources of learning: Join the Science Club and check out other cool science experiments at - http://www.SteveSpanglerScience.com Sign up to receive a FREE Experiment of the Week- http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment-of-the-week Attend a Spangler Hands-on Science Workshop for Teachers - http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/training Watch Steve on Local and National Media Appearances on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/user/SpanglerScienceTV

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