100 Year Old Self-Playing Violin - "The Eighth Wonder Of the World"

100 Year Old Self-Playing Violin - "The Eighth Wonder Of the World"

This amazing instrument is The Hupfeld Phonoliszt Violina - an Orchestrion with self-playing Violins, Enjoy! Name: Phonoliszt Violina Type of Instrument: Orchestrion Year Built: 1914 Maker: Ludwig Hupfeld A.-G. Place of Manufacture: Leipzig, Germany Welcome to the first episode of our completely new video series: Music Machine Mondays. This series is an attempt to share the wonders of the Speelklok Museum with you. Speelklok is a mechanical music instrument museum in Utrecht, The Netherlands. We have filmed my favourite instruments from the museums collection and on every monday we feature a different mechanical masterpiece. All the Best/ Martin & Co ------------------ Video Made by Martin Molin & Hannes Knutsson I made a Plywood Playbutton to celebrate 100 subs for Hannes Youtube channel TRAINERDS, check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpQBos0uBVU&t=2s Thanks to our friends at the lovely Speelklok Museum: https://www.museumspeelklok.nl Guide from Speelklok Museum: Lois Tonen SUBSCRIBE TO WINTERGATAN https://www.youtube.com/user/wintergatan2000 WINTERGATAN MUSIC - DIGITAL DOWNLOAD https://wintergatan.bandcamp.com/ WINTERGATAN MUSIC - PHYSICAL RECORDS http://www.wintergatan.net/#/shop LISTEN TO WINTERGATAN ON SPOTIFY http://bit.ly/2oKxXWd LISTEN TO WINTERGATAN ON ITUNES http://apple.co/2ntWNsZ WEBSITE http://www.wintergatan.net Camera: Justin Nan www.deepthoughtproductions.com Camera: Michaël van Ketel: www.linkedin.com/in/micha%C3%ABl-van-ketel-49982b73/ Camera: Mattia Ferragina www.behance.net/MattiaF

Orchestrion song 2

Orchestrion song 2

enjoy!

The Marble Machine Orchestra

The Marble Machine Orchestra

Learn more about The Marble Machine Orchestra: http://bit.ly/2rNr6wp Hammacher Schlemmer: http://bit.ly/2siGCUp This is the mechanical musical apparatus made in Sweden that generates mellifluous melodies with a multitude of marbles. Constructed from birch plywood and steel, it is comprised of gears, pulleys, tracks, lifting fingers, and funnels that work in concert to generate the precisely timed release of marbles which strike instruments. The entire operation begins by turning the handcrank to set the 18" flywheel into motion, which stores rotational energy and provides the musician a way to keep even time. Working similarly to a music box, the machine's marbles strike the keys of the built-in vibraphone, the four strings of an electric bass guitar, a kick drum, snare drum, hi hat, one-stringed modulin, and a sizzle cymbal—the operator pushes/pulls a series of levers to activate/deactivate a particular instrument. The programming wheel contains a 64-bar loop, which makes the device similar in operation to the Orchestrions of yesteryear.

Smooth Criminal M.Jackson à l'orgue de barbarie

Smooth Criminal M.Jackson à l'orgue de barbarie

Smooth Criminal - Michael Jackson. Arrangement: Patrick Mathis - www.patrickmathis.net - Orgue de barbarie ODIN : www.odin.fr

Concert Variations on The Star Spangled Banner played on the Melville Clark player reed organ

Concert Variations on The Star Spangled Banner played on the Melville Clark player reed organ

This organ was built in the 1890's and has never been fully restored yet it plays quite beautifully. Here's a little patriotic music for the July 4 holiday.

Decap Orchestrion im Technikmuseum Sinsheim

Decap Orchestrion im Technikmuseum Sinsheim

Die mechanischen Musikinstrumente sind ein interessanter Teil der Technikgeschichte. Im AUTO & TECHNIK MUSEUM SINSHEIM kann eine umfangreiche Sammlung dieser technisch sehr anspruchsvollen Wunderwerke bestaunt werden. Die meisten Instrumente sind voll spielfähig und können von den Besuchern in Gang gesetzt werden. music: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Ryan_Cullinane/Production_Music_1635/Synthetic_Pop_2_With_Drums

Popper Orchestrion Clarabella VIDEO 5 Restored by Roberts Musical Restorations

Popper Orchestrion Clarabella VIDEO 5 Restored by Roberts Musical Restorations

This is an early Poppers Orchestrion model Clarabella. This unit was totally restored by Roberts Musical Restorations. This Orchestrion has 60 piano notes, cymbal (soft, med, crash), bass drum (loud, med and soft) and Tympani, Snare Drum (loud and soft) wood block (loud and soft), Triangle, 27 note Xylophone and a 15 note Glockenspiel (bells). The rolls typically have 2-3 songs. The front painting has a movable scene. The water mill turns and the water flows. Because of the back lighting you cannot see the water flowing in this video. For more details on this restoration and many others visit www.RobertsMusicalRestorations.com for all of your restoration needs. Enjoy

Museum Speelklok: Self-playing musical instruments [HD]

Museum Speelklok: Self-playing musical instruments [HD]

Museum Speelklok is a museum in Utrecht, The Netherlands (Holland). The collection consists of self-playing musical instruments from the 16th century to the present day. Self-playing musical instruments come with a program enabling them to play music without the aid of a human performer. They exist in an overwhelming variety of types and sizes: - musical clocks announce the striking of the hour with preludes on bells, organ pipes or strings - musical boxes play their tuned steel combs from pinned brass cylinders or steel discs - pianolas and orchestrions play their music as programmed on wooden, brass-pinned cylinders and perforated paper rolls - barrel organs play their music from pinned wooden barrels - large street organs, fairground organs and dance organs play from folding cardboard music books Over the years the museum has become popular nationwide and internationally. The museum's restauration workshops are a leader in their field. The museum was founded in 1956. Since 1984 it is housed in the former medieval church 'Buurkerk', Utrecht (Netherlands). https://www.museumspeelklok.nl/lang/en September 18, 2016 (second visit) My first visit in 2010 can be seen here: https://youtu.be/W1enQW47wA8

Popper Barrel Orchestrion

Popper Barrel Orchestrion

A Popper Barrel orchestrion in the Schloss Bruchsal Mechanical Music Museum, August 2016. 0:00 Count of Luxembourg Waltz

Jukebox Manufacturing: "A Visit to Wurlitzer" 1950 Wurlitzer Making Phonograph Jukeboxes

Jukebox Manufacturing: "A Visit to Wurlitzer" 1950 Wurlitzer Making Phonograph Jukeboxes

more at http://electronics.quickfound.net/ "Tour of the Wurlitzer factory located at North Tonawanda, N.Y., showing the manufacture of 'coin-operated phonographs.' A color sequence introducing the factory and its surroundings is followed by a black-and-white kinescope showing the different stages of production." NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBgEPwq3LSQ Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jukebox A jukebox or nickelodeon is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that will play a patron's selection from self-contained media. The classic jukebox has buttons with letters and numbers on them that, when entered in combination, are used to play a specific selection. History Coin-operated music boxes and player pianos were the first forms of automated coin-operated musical devices. These instruments used paper rolls, metal disks, or metal cylinders to play a musical selection on the instrument, or instruments, enclosed within the device. In the 1890s these devices were joined by machines which used actual recordings instead of physical instruments. In 1890, Louis Glass and William S. Arnold invented the nickel-in-the-slot phonograph, the first of which was an Edison Class M Electric Phonograph retrofitted with a device patented under the name of Coin Actuated Attachment for Phonograph. The music was heard via one of four listening tubes. Early designs, upon receiving a coin, unlocked the mechanism, allowing the listener to turn a crank which simultaneously wound the spring motor and placed the reproducer's stylus in the starting groove. Frequently exhibitors would equip many of these machines with listening tubes (acoustic headphones) and array them in "phonograph parlors" allowing the patron to select between multiple records, each played on its own machine. Some machines even contained carousels and other mechanisms for playing multiple records. Most machines were capable of holding only one musical selection, the automation coming from the ability to play that one selection at will. In 1918 Hobart C. Niblack patented an apparatus that automatically changed records, leading to one of the first selective jukeboxes being introduced in 1927 by the Automated Musical Instrument Company, later known as AMI. In 1928, Justus P. Seeburg, who was manufacturing player pianos, combined an electrostatic loudspeaker with a record player that was coin operated, and gave the listener a choice of eight records. This Audiophone machine was wide and bulky, and had eight separate turntables mounted on a rotating Ferris wheel-like device, allowing patrons to select from eight different records. Later versions of the jukebox included Seeburg's Selectophone, with 10 turntables mounted vertically on a spindle. By maneuvering the tone arm up and down, the customer could select from 10 different records... Jukeboxes were most popular from the 1940s through the mid-1960s, particularly during the 1950s. By the middle of the 1940s, three-quarters of the records produced in America went into jukeboxes. While often associated with early rock and roll music, their popularity extends back much further, including classical music, opera and the swing music era. In 1977, The Kinks recorded a song called "Jukebox Music" for their album Sleepwalker. Styling progressed from the plain wooden boxes in the early thirties to beautiful light shows with marbelized plastic and color animation in the Wurlitzer 850 Peacock of 1941. But after the United States entered the war, metal and plastic were needed for the war effort. Jukeboxes were considered "nonessential", and none were produced until 1946. The 1942 Wurlitzer 950 featured wooden coin chutes to save on metal... Notable models - 1946 Wurlitzer Model 1015 - referred to as the "1015 bubbler" offered 24 selections. More than 56,000 were sold in less than 2 years and it is considered a pop culture icon. Designed by Wurlitzer's Paul Fuller... - Wurlitzer 950 - 75-90 known to exist and valued at US$35,000...

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