The North Korean Government Explained

The North Korean Government Explained

How Powerful Is Facebook? http://bit.ly/1Hdg0rs » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Charities have received large donations from the deep pockets of billionaires. So which philanthropists have donated the most to charity? Learn More: Mark Zuckerberg Will Donate Massive Fortune to Own Blinkered Worldview http://gawker.com/mark-zuckerberg-will-donate-massive-fortune-to-own-blin-1745573343 "In a savvy PR maneuver, today Mark Zuckerberg used the birth of his daughter Max to advertise to the world the fact that he's decided to give away 99% of his Facebook shares (roughly $45 billion today) to charity (over the course of the rest of his life, not all at once)." Top 10 Largest Private Charitable Foundations In The World Created By Richest People For 2015 http://ceoworld.biz/2015/08/03/top-10-largest-private-charitable-foundations-in-the-world-created-by-richest-people-for-2015 "The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation ((BMGF), established by Bill and Melinda Gates tops the list of the 10 largest private charitable foundations led by the World's richest people, according to a study of philanthropies created by ultra-high-net-worth individuals. " 10 more billionaires join Buffett-Gates Giving Pledge http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/02/news/companies/giving-pledge-billionaires-buffett-gates/ "They signed the Giving Pledge -- an effort started in 2010 by Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates -- to encourage billionaires to commit to giving away most of their money either during their lifetimes or in their wills." Music Track Courtesy of APM Music: "Make A Promise" _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Tweet @NowThisNews on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

I Escaped North Korea. Here’s My Message for President Trump. | NYT - Opinion

I Escaped North Korea. Here’s My Message for President Trump. | NYT - Opinion

Yeonmi Park and her family suffered tragically under the North Korean regime. Now she’s urging the United States to pressure Kim Jong-un to end the holocaust against his own people. More from The New York Times Video: Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch all of our videos here: http://nytimes.com/video Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytvideo Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo ---------- Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.

How the Kim Dynasty Took Over North Korea | History

How the Kim Dynasty Took Over North Korea | History

North Korea hasn’t always been under the totalitarian rule of the Kim regime. Foreign enablers and internal strife have completely reshaped the region over the last 100+ years, transforming a once-peaceful monarchy into the oppressive dictatorship we know today. #HistoryChannel Subscribe for more HISTORY: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=historychannel Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY/posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays. HISTORY;, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.

Kim Jong Un meets with South Korean officials

Kim Jong Un meets with South Korean officials

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hosted a dinner for a high-ranking South Korean delegation in Pyongyang, according to a South Korean government official. It's believed to be the first time the young leader has spoken face-to-face with officials from the South since he took power in 2011. Among those Kim met were South Korea's national security chief, Chung Eui-yong, and the country's spy chief, Suh Hoon. Their trip north is part of South Korean President Moon Jae-in's attempt to broker a diplomatic solution to North Korea's nuclear weapons program in the wake of the thaw brought about by North Korea's attendance at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics last month.

Inside the North Korean Worker's Party Congress

Inside the North Korean Worker's Party Congress

Will Ripley takes us inside the Worker's Party Congress in Pyongyang. CNN was granted unprecedented access to the party's first meeting in 36 years.

Visiting North Korea | DW Documentary

Visiting North Korea | DW Documentary

Few tourists manage to peek behind the iron curtain of North Korea's dictatorship. But the journalist Luca Faccio managed to visit Kim Jong Un's regime. Anyone venturing behind the world’s last Iron Curtain into North Korea will experience a very different country to the one we know only through the usual images of rocket launches and mass rallies. The country is ruled by the dictator Kim Jong Un, whom the people worship - or are made to worship - as a god-like father figure. Little is known about daily life in North Korea, because all images that reach the outside world have been censored by the government. Visitors rarely see evidence of oppression, enforced conformity and starvation in the rural population. Still, journalist Luca Faccio is able to offer some interesting insights into the isolated country - although, of course, government watchdogs are on his heels everywhere he goes. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954

North Korean government officials involved in drug trafficking

North Korean government officials involved in drug trafficking

A Sky News special report uncovers links to China

Why North Korea Agreed To Meet With Trump

Why North Korea Agreed To Meet With Trump

Ji Seong-ho is a North Korean defector currently residing in South Korea. He now runs an organization 'NAUH' helping other North Koreans escape. Here's why he thinks North Korea suddenly agreed to a meeting with Trump. Below is the following transcript: Ji Seong-ho: North Korea is simply trying to buy more time. They aren't willing to give up their nuclear program but are growing weary of the joint military exercises and the anger of the American public and its government. The same goes for Trump's government. To ensure the security of the nation, negotiating with North Korea concerning their nuclear program and disarming this threat is their highest priority. And it's come to ap oint where they feel the need to take real action against North Korea. And this is troubling new for North Korea and they are quite scared as well. In reality, if you take a look at North Korea, it's the government that's afraid of staring a war, not the people. The people can survive through wars but the North Korean government survives by exploiting its people and bullying other countries. It's a good life for them but starting a war would endanger all of that, not to mention their lives. Although North Korea likes to brag about their successful missile launches and nuclear tests, they still need more time to complete their program. I think this meeting is to buy that very time. Also Kim Jong-Un is being pressured to make a move as the public sentiment towards him is very bad. Kim Jong-Un promised his people a paradise to live in in just five years. His father said the same thing and so did his father before him. The people were unsure whether he could be trusted but gave him a chance nonetheless. In the end, Kim Jong-Un couldn't keep his promise. On top of that, the trade sanctions have increased the living costs and made the lives harder for the people. To these people who are used to surviving without aid from their government, they can't understand its obsession with the nuclear program. And Kim Jong-Un has to resolve this by making a cooperative gesture towards the world. Last year, after their sixth successful test, they declared themselves a nuclear power and promised the end of famine for all its people. Less than a week later, they contradicted themselves by warning people of another possible famine in the near-future. People are growing upset over the incompetence of their government. People are pressuring the government to take real actions and Kim Jong-Un tried to ease this tension at home during the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, gesturing for harmony with South Korea and giving people hopes for more foreign aids and increase in their quality of lives. With everyone having different agendas for this meeting, everything depends on North Korea's attitude. I think for a change to come out of this meeting, North Korea must accept its own mistakes and be open to ending their nuclear program. -------------------------------------------------- Follow Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Follow BI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/businessinsider/ Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ -------------------------------------------------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

Inside North Korea's All-Women Restaurant Chain

Inside North Korea's All-Women Restaurant Chain

Over 100 Pyongyang restaurants are spread throughout Asia, all owned and operated by the North Korean government as a way to generate foreign currency. Female citizens are sent out from North Korea to work as servers at the restaurants, and they're overseen by minders to assure they don't defect. Here's what it's like to dine in one of the restaurants. Special thanks to Hikosaemon: https://www.youtube.com/user/Hikosaemon Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, science, retail, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/ BI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/businessinsider/ BI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ BI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: Hikosaemon: The food has been great, the music entertainment was astounding, in terms of experiencing the North Korean culture and what it's like. It was super cool. North Korea's government owns and operates around 130 restaurants across Asia. The restaurants are called Pyongyang, named after the capital of North Korea. Serving North Korean food and liquor and featuring live music, the chain offers visitors a rare glimpse into the reclusive nation's culture. Hikosaemon: The food is excellent, actually. Tokyo based video-blogger, Hikosaemon visited the Pyongyang restaurant in Dalian, China. Hikosaemon: It looked like fairly standard Korean food, it was various kimchi, various sort of, soups and meats and so on. It wasn't that much to look at but it really was very good. It was really tasty. The beer, as well. I think it tasted a bit like Tsingtao. It was one of those, sort of light, sweetish beers that they make in China. But I have to say, I wasn't expecting much of the food. Again, you just have this idea that it's a resource poor country that you don't expect the food to be a little bit austere or something. The wait staff is made up only young North Korean women. They serve food, perform pop songs and traditional Korean music and chat with the diners. Hikosaemon: The people who are serving your meal, they sit down at your table and you get to chat with them for a time and ask them about North Korea and they ask about Japan and so on and then they go up and they sing, they dance, they play multiple instruments. I've never experienced anything like that at all, I suppose. The Pyongyang restaurant chain generates about 10 million dollars for North Korea each year but here's the catch: the restaurants are a direct violation of UN sanctions.  Julian Ku: The United Nations Security Council has required any country in the world that's a member of the United Nations to enforce sanctions on North Korea to limit its access to foreign currency and to foreign products and these are very wide-ranging sanctions and they include things like allowing them to operate joint ventures or businesses in your country. So, the United Nations has passed this resolution. It was agreed to by all the major countries, including China and the United States but it's up to each individual country to enforce those sanctions and so countries can choose to either look the other way or lightly enforce it or not enforce it at all. Pyongyang employees are selected by the government and kept under a watchful eye. Julian Ku: The one thing that's interesting about these businesses is what it requires North Korea to do is send its own people out into the world. In North Korea, you're not actually allowed to leave the country. That's why people will call it a prison camp. You have to get special permission and it's really hard to get and almost no one gets to go abroad and when they do go abroad, they're tightly isolated and kept away. Hikosaemon: I just appreciated the fact that it sort of humanized the image of the country just a little bit while at the same time still having all that thing, that you know them and the restaurant's there for hard currency for the regime and the people there are not strictly free. They have minders. They can go out in town with minders and so on but basically, they live in a dorm attached to the restaurant. It didn't feel like I was at a prison camp or being spied upon, as much as you might expect that to be. It actually surprised me at how normal it was and it was a pleasant evening in spite of perhaps knowing what else is going on. The restaurants made news in 2016 when a crew of 13 workers defected to South Korea. South Korea's foreign ministry has advised people to not dine in Pyongyang restaurants because the profits benefit the Kim regime. But with warming relations between North Korea and the rest of the world, these chains may become less taboo in the future.

North Korea’s Kim Dynasty Explained

North Korea’s Kim Dynasty Explained

The North Korean Government Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGCodBnM2hI » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe North Korea's Kim dynasty is known for its discreet, but repressive, governance. So what exactly do we know about this ruling family? Learn More: The Guardian: North Korea's Kim Dynasty: the Making of a Personality Cult https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/16/north-korea-kim-jong-il-birthday PBS: In the Land of the Dear Leader http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/kim/them/schell.html ABC: The Kims of North Korea: How Myth and Propaganda Sustain a Family Dynasty http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-02/family-dynasties-why-are-the-kims-still-in-power/7984320 Music Track Courtesy of APM Music: "Accused" More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld Written by: Jennie Butler Edited by: Alex Esteves Produced by: Cailyn Bradley, Semany Gashaw & Lauren Ellis

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