NORTH AMERICAN A3J VIGILANTE / A-5 AIRCRAFT PROMOTIONAL FILM 81234

NORTH AMERICAN A3J VIGILANTE / A-5 AIRCRAFT   PROMOTIONAL FILM 81234

This film V FOR VIGILANTE is a promotional piece made by North American Aviation to promote the “super sonic rifle”, the Navy's A3J fighter plane known as the A3J Vigilante (1:14). At the time the aircraft was being used as a nuclear weapon delivery platform. According to the film, the plane "contains some of the most advanced electronic equipment created by science" (1:42). The pilot and navigator could fly this plane over thousands of miles (1:56). Unlike missiles or unmanned crafts, this could be redirected to new targets while in flight (2:05). It is flown by television and radar and guided by devices enabling sight in the dark (2:21). The officers of the Bureau of Naval Weapons play a decisive role in choosing which crafts and equipment are used and will direct Aviation personnel to construct them (3:03). The Columbia division was chosen to construct the Vigilante (3:30). It will contain two turbo engines that enable movement faster than the speed of sound (3:55). After thourough plans have been drawn, a scale model is constructed (4:57). In the Columbus Division’s wind tunnel, jet streams will test the planes handling (5:31). The model is able to do everything a regular plane can, save for flight (5:38). Flight conditions are simulated by engineers and they seek ways to improve the craft (5:47). From here, the production of the Vigilante will commence (5:58). Miniscule components are machined (6:31) and in temperature controlled rooms, specific instruments are used for inspection (6:34). On the factory floor, the wings are crafted (6:54) as mechanics and Navy inspectors ensure proper construction (7:11). The craft is 73 feet long (7:35) and tail assembly rises twenty feet in the air (7:45). One unique feature is the linear rejection bomb bay (7:50). After construction, test engineers take over (7:56). In a steel rig, the craft will endure strenuous conditions (8:13). There will be many tests to follow such as how the pilot will save himself in emergency (9:30). After Columbus, it will head westward for the California desert to the North American test facility (10:29). The plane received international awards for flying seventeen miles above the stratosphere (11:04). As the Vigilante has now proven itself, it is sent to join the Fleet (11:34). The North American A-5 Vigilante is an American carrier-based supersonic bomber designed and built by North American Aviation for the United States Navy. Its service in the nuclear strike role to replace the Douglas A-3 Skywarrior was very short; however, as the RA-5C, it saw extensive service during the Vietnam War in the tactical strike reconnaissance role. Prior to the unification of the Navy designation sequence with the Air Force sequence in 1962, it was designated the A3J Vigilante. The Vigilante, designed and built for the U.S. Navy by North American Aircraft Division at Columbus, Ohio, was the only Mach 2 bomber to serve aboard a Navy carrier. Initially designated the A3J-1 attack bomber, it was one of the largest and heaviest aircraft ever accepted for service aboard U.S. Navy carriers. Production began in 1956, and it entered squadron service in June 1961. It was redesignated the A-5 and fully deployed by August 1962, when the USS Enterprise, the Navy’s first nuclear aircraft carrier, made its inaugural cruise. Changing defense strategies marked a change of focus away from carrier-based, heavy-attack squadrons. In 1964, all the Vigilantes were reconfigured as reconnaissance aircraft and designated RA-5C. Reconnaissance gear was mounted in what had been the Vigilante’s bomb bay. Other modifications allowed the RA-5C to carry four external fuel tanks. These additions increased the airplane’s range on reconnaissance missions and allowed it to keep its attack capability with externally mounted bombs and rockets. The RA-5C Vigilante first flew on June 30, 1962, and was capable of all-weather, long-range, carrier- or land-based, multisensor, reconnaissance missions involving high-altitude supersonic, or very low-altitude, high-speed penetrations. Its inertial navigation system provided the precise position location information demanded. The Vigilante pilot and the reconnaissance/attack navigator (RAN) sat in tandem under individual clamshell-type canopies. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

GRUMMAN F6F HELLCAT FIGHTER AIRCRAFT PRODUCTION LINE 1944 PROMOTIONAL FILM 80304

GRUMMAN F6F HELLCAT FIGHTER AIRCRAFT PRODUCTION LINE 1944 PROMOTIONAL FILM 80304

Produced in 1944 by Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, GRUMMAN AT WAR shows the company in full swing as part of the WWII production effort. The film was released along with a companion book to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the company's founding. By the time it was made, production of the Wildcat and Avenger had been taken over by the Eastern Aircraft Division of General Motors Corporation, under their FM and TBM designations, to allow Grumman to concentrate on production of the F6F Hellcat, the star of this film. The film was produced by the Princeton Film Center and produced by Leroy G. Phelps and Gordon Knox and directed by Robert Elwyn. The Grumman F6F Hellcat is an American carrier-based fighter aircraft of World War II. Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War. The Hellcat competed with the faster Vought F4U Corsair for that role and prevailed, as the Corsair had significant issues with carrier landings. The Corsair instead was primarily deployed to great effect in land-based use by the U.S. Marine Corps. Powered by a 2,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters, the F6F was an entirely new design, but it still resembled the Wildcat in many ways. Some military observers tagged the Hellcat as the "Wildcat's big brother". The F6F was best known for its role as a rugged, well-designed carrier fighter which was able, after its combat debut in September 1943, to outperform the A6M Zero and help secure air superiority over the Pacific Theater. 12,275 were built in just over two years. Hellcats were credited with destroying a total of 5,223 enemy aircraft while in service with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm.This was more than any other Allied naval aircraft. Postwar, the Hellcat was phased out of front line service but remained in service as late as 1954 as a night fighter. Incidentally, in the opening sequences, an aircraft is shown that is the "first F6F ever made", but in reality that moniker would be more appropriate for the XF6F-1, which had it's first flight on June 26, 1942. The "stand-in" Hellcat shown is probably an F6F-3 in Test Department markings. The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, later Grumman Aerospace Corporation, was a leading 20th century U.S. producer of military and civilian aircraft. Founded on December 6, 1929, by Leroy Grumman and partners, its independent existence ended in 1994 when it was acquired by Northrop Corporation to form Northrop Grumman. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

Aircraft Familiarization in the A3J Vigilante Operating Procedures

Aircraft Familiarization in the A3J Vigilante Operating Procedures

AGM-28 Hound Dog Missile Launch from B-52: "Operation Bluenose" 1960 NAA-SAC; fixed sound

AGM-28 Hound Dog Missile Launch from B-52: "Operation Bluenose" 1960 NAA-SAC; fixed sound

Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney Missiles playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLECC3BE1B25F14233 Tactical Air Command & Strategic Air Command playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDA4AA323F09DB86C more at http://quickfound.net/ Hound Dog missile launch exercise from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Produced by North American Aviation, Inc. Space and Information Systems Divsion in cooperation with the Strategic Air Command. Originally a public domain film from the US Air Force, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AGM-28_Hound_Dog Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The North American Aviation AGM-28 Hound Dog was a supersonic, turbojet-propelled, air-launched cruise missile developed in 1959 for the United States Air Force. It was primarily designed to be capable of attacking Soviet ground-based air defense sites prior to a potential air attack by B-52 Stratofortress long range bombers during the Cold War. The Hound Dog was first given the designation B-77, then redesignated GAM-77, and finally as AGM-28. It was conceived as a temporary standoff missile for the B-52, to be used until the GAM-87 Skybolt air-launched ballistic missile was available. Instead, the Skybolt was cancelled within a few years and the Hound Dog continued to be deployed for a total of 15 years until its replacement by newer missiles, including the AGM-69 SRAM and then the AGM-86 ALCM... The Hound Dog missile's airframe was an adaptation of technology developed in the SM-64 Navaho missile, adapted for launching from the B-52. The Hound Dog's design was based on that of the Navaho G-38 missile, which featured small delta wings and forward canards. A Pratt & Whitney J52-P-3 turbojet propelled the Hound Dog, instead of Navaho's ramjet engine. The J52 engine was located in a pod located beneath the rear fuselage, giving it an appearance similar to the Lockheed X-7 high-speed experimental drone. The J52-P-3 used in the Hound Dog, unlike J52s installed in aircraft like the A-4 Skyhawk or the A-6 Intruder, was optimized to run at maximum power during the missile's flight. As a result, the Hound Dog's version of the J52 had a short operating lifetime of only six hours. However, in combat, the Hound Dog was expected to self-destruct in less than six hours. A derivative of the Navaho's NAA Autonetics Division N-6 inertial navigation system (INS), the N5G, was used in the Hound Dog. A Kollsman Instruments Co. star tracker located in the B-52's pylon was used to correct inertial navigation system orientation errors with celestial observations while the Hound Dog was being carried by the B-52. The INS could also be used to determine the bomber's position after the initial calibration and "leveling" process, which took about 90 minutes. The Hound Dog had a circular error probable (CEP) of 3.5 kilometres (2.2 mi), which was acceptable for a weapon equipped with a nuclear warhead. The thermonuclear warhead carried by the Hound Dog was the W28 Class D. The W28 warhead could be preset to yield an explosive power of between 70 kilotons and 1.45 megatons. Detonation of the Hound Dog's W28 warhead could be programmed to occur on impact (ground burst) or air burst at a preset altitude. An air burst would have been used against a large area, soft target. A surface impact would have been used against a hard target such as a missile site or command and control center. The Hound Dog could be launched from the B-52 Stratofortress at high altitudes or low altitudes, but not below 1,500 metres... The first air-drop test of a dummy Hound Dog was carried out in November 1958. 52 GAM-77A missiles were launched for testing and training purposes between 23 April 1959 and 30 August 1965. Hound Dog launches occurred at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico...

U.S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER LANDING MISHAPS & CRASHES Training Film 9002

U.S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER LANDING MISHAPS & CRASHES Training Film 9002

Landing a plane on the deck of aircraft carrier is one of the most dangerous and amazing daily activity facing pilots and deck crew. This amazing training film graphically depicts various aircraft landing disasters. It also instructs pilots how to avoid them and what emergency ejection or ditching procedures to follow in case they do occur. A barrier landing, called for when a pilot has a landing gear problem, is shown as is the set-up of the barrier. Many crashes in this film were captured by the Pilot Landing Aid Television system, known as PLAT, so quality is not optimal. While the image are low resolution, they enable incidents to be studied in some detail. The impact and the lessons learned from these plane crashes are dramatic and serve as excellent training for new pilots. Ships seen in the film are the nuclear carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and the conventional USS Boxer (CV-21). Planes seen in the film are: F-8 Crusader amongst many others. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

Pioneers Of Aviation Alan and Malcolm Lockheed

Pioneers Of Aviation Alan and Malcolm Lockheed

Allan and Malcolm Loughead were pioneers of California's airplane industry. They pronounced Loughead "lock-heed." Later in their lives they changed the spelling to match the pronunciation. The brothers were born in Niles, California. They became interested in airplanes as teenagers, after their older brother showed them a book that he wrote about planes and flying. As young men, the Loughead brothers worked as auto mechanics. They designed and built airplanes in their free time. In 1913, they flew their first plane over San Francisco Bay. It was one of the biggest planes ever built. In 1916, the brothers opened an airplane factory in Santa Barbara, but their planes did not sell because they were too large and expensive. Malcolm Loughead went back to work in auto mechanics. He designed a successful braking system for cars, which made him wealthy. Allan Loughead stayed in the airplane industry. In 1926, he designed the popular Vega airplane. Orders for Vega airplanes began to pour in and the Lockheed Aircraft Company became a success.

Convair B-58 Hustler Low Level Bombing Capabilities

Convair B-58 Hustler Low Level Bombing Capabilities

The mach 2 Convair B-58 HUSTLER was the vanguard of low-level bombing techniques used in later aircraft. This old film, salvaged from antiquainted 2" studio tape, reveals the capabilities of this amazing 1950s aircraft.

SPITFIRE 944

SPITFIRE 944

In 2005, an 83 year-old World War II pilot is surprised to see 16mm footage of his 1944 Spitfire crash for the first time. SPITFIRE 944 was put on YouTube as part of the Sundance Film Festival Memorial Day observance through from May 22 through June 5, 2013 (UPDATE, ShortsHD is allowing the film to stay on youtube for the moment:) The Sundance portal is here: http://www.sundance.org/stories/artic... If you are interested in your own copy, you can find it on iTunes here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/movie/spi... See more Sundance curated short films at http://www.youtube.com/screeningroom

Submarine Salvage ~ 1965 US Navy Training Film; How a Sunken Submarine is Surfaced

Submarine Salvage ~ 1965 US Navy Training Film; How a Sunken Submarine is Surfaced

Submarines & Diving playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1C388CF94E3C0F45 US Navy Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA40407C12E5E35A7 more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html U.S. Navy training film shows the procedures used to salvage a submarine stranded at the bottom of the ocean. Originally a public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/ceneoddive/ndstc/Default.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_salvage Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Marine salvage is the process of recovering a ship and its cargo after a shipwreck or other maritime casualty. Salvage may encompass towing, re-floating a vessel, or effecting repairs to a ship. Today, protecting the coastal environment from spillage of oil or other contaminants is a high priority. Before the invention of radio, salvage services would be given to a stricken vessel by any ship that happened to be passing by, nowadays most salvage is carried out by specialist salvage firms with dedicated crew and equipment. The legal significance of salvage is that a successful salvor is entitled to a reward, which is a proportion of the total value of the ship and its cargo. The amount of the award is determined subsequently at a "hearing on the merits" by a maritime court in accordance with Articles 13 and 14 of the International Salvage Convention of 1989. The common law concept of salvage was established by the English Admiralty Court, and is defined as "a voluntary successful service provided in order to save maritime property in danger at sea, entitling the salvor to a reward"; and this definition has been further refined by the 1989 Convention. Originally, a "successful" salvage was one where at least some of the ship or cargo was saved, otherwise the principle of "No Cure, No Pay" meant that the salvor would get nothing. In the 1970s, a number of marine casualties of single-skin-hull tankers led to serious oil spills. Such casualties were unattractive to salvors, so the Lloyd's Open Form (LOF) made provision that a salvor who acts to try to prevent environmental damage will be paid, even if unsuccessful. This Lloyd's initiative proved so advantageous that it was incorporated into the 1989 Convention. All vessels have an international duty to give reasonable assistance to other ships in distress in order to save life, but there is no obligation to try to salve the vessel. Any offer of salvage assistance may be refused; but if it is accepted a contract automatically arises to give the successful salvor the right to a reward under the 1989 Convention. Typically, the ship and the salvor will sign up to an LOF agreement so that the terms of salvage are clear. Since 2000, it has become standard to append a SCOPIC clause to the LOF, so as to circumvent the limitations of the "Special Compensation" provisions of the 1989 Convention (pursuant to the case of the Nagasaki Spirit)...

Wings F 4 Phantom II

Wings F 4 Phantom II

Wings F-4 Phantom II

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