Mesopotamia: Crash Course World History #3

Mesopotamia: Crash Course World History #3

In which John presents Mesopotamia, and the early civilizations that arose around the Fertile Crescent. Topics covered include the birth of territorial kingdoms, empires, Neo-Assyrian torture tactics, sacred marriages, ancient labor practices, the world's first law code, and the great failed romance of John's undergrad years. Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set Resources: The British Museum's Mesopotamia site: http://goo.gl/Fn4dN5 The Epic of Gilgamesh: http://goo.gl/9i7svQ or get a hard copy at https://goo.gl/iKsCDD Mesopotamia: Assyrians, Sumerians, Babylonians by Enrico Ascalone: http://goo.gl/iL487J The Mesopotamians by TMBG: https://goo.gl/1D4lXo Credits: Written by Raoul Meyer and John Green Produced by Stan Muller Animations by Smart Bubble Society: http://thoughtbubble.org/ Thought Bubble team: Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathon Corbiere Allan Levy Jin Kyung Myung James Tuer Adam Winnik Original Music: Jason Weidner Script Supervisor & Doll Costumer: Danica Johnson Set Design: Donna Sink Props: Brian McCutcheon Photos courtesy of: Mbzt Hardnfast Marie Lan-Nguyen Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! ‪http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow us again! ‪http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse

Noah Movie HD Official Full Version

Noah Movie HD Official Full Version

Noah Movie HD: Noah—And the Last Days Connect: http://www.NoahTheMovie.com Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/OfficialRayComfort Twitter: https://www.Twitter.com/RayComfort Get DVDs in bulk as low as $1: http://www.NoahTheMovie.com In the time of Noah, people were going about their daily lives, not mindful of the impending destruction. Like them, are we ignoring warnings of God's coming judgment? The Bible gives us clear signs of the last days. Did you know the Scriptures say we will see: • Flippant use of God's name • Money-hungry preachers and rampant hypocrisy in the church • Wars and rumors of wars • Denial of a global flood But surely no educated person could believe that Noah and his ark ever really existed. Wouldn't it be impossible to fit millions of species of animals into one boat? And what evidence is there (if any) for a worldwide catastrophic flood? However...what if it did all happen exactly as the Bible says? What would that mean? Who was Noah, and why is the amazing account of his life so relevant to you in the 21st century? Don't be caught unaware. Time may be very short. Will you be ready? A movie by Ray Comfort. This is not the Russell Crowe film.

Classic Movie Bloopers and Mistakes: Film Stars Uncensored - 1930s and 1940s Outtakes

Classic Movie Bloopers and Mistakes: Film Stars Uncensored - 1930s and 1940s Outtakes

Classical Hollywood cinema or the classical Hollywood narrative, are terms used in film history which designate both a visual and sound style for making motion pictures and a mode of production used in the American film industry between 1917 and 1960. More bloopers: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=2e2330f57788ff94fc8dbab62c46051c&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=classic%20movie%20bloopers This period is often referred to as the "Golden Age of Hollywood." An identifiable cinematic form emerged during this period called classical Hollywood style. Classical style is fundamentally built on the principle of continuity editing or "invisible" style. That is, the camera and the sound recording should never call attention to themselves (as they might in films from earlier periods, other countries or in a modernist or postmodernist work). Throughout the early 1930s, risque films and salacious advertising, became widespread in the short period known as Pre-Code Hollywood. MGM dominated the industry and had the top stars in Hollywood, and was also credited for creating the Hollywood star system altogether. MGM stars included at various times "King of Hollywood" Clark Gable, Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Jean Harlow, Gary Cooper, Mary Pickford, Henry Fonda, Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Judy Garland, Ava Gardner, James Stewart, Katharine Hepburn, Vivien Leigh, Grace Kelly, Gene Kelly, Gloria Stuart, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, John Wayne, Barbara Stanwyck, John Barrymore, Audrey Hepburn and Buster Keaton. Another great achievement of American cinema during this era came through Walt Disney's animation. In 1937, Disney created the most successful film of its time, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Many film historians have remarked upon the many great works of cinema that emerged from this period of highly regimented film-making. One reason this was possible is that, with so many movies being made, not every one had to be a big hit. A studio could gamble on a medium-budget feature with a good script and relatively unknown actors: Citizen Kane, directed by Orson Welles and often regarded as the greatest film of all time, fits that description. In other cases, strong-willed directors like Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock and Frank Capra battled the studios in order to achieve their artistic visions. The apogee of the studio system may have been the year 1939, which saw the release of such classics as The Wizard of Oz, Gone with the Wind, Stagecoach, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Destry Rides Again,Young Mr. Lincoln, Wuthering Heights, Only Angels Have Wings, Ninotchka, Babes in Arms, Gunga Din, and The Roaring Twenties. Among the other films from the Golden Age period that are now considered to be classics: Casablanca, The Adventures of Robin Hood, It's a Wonderful Life, It Happened One Night, King Kong, Citizen Kane, Swing Time, Some Like It Hot, A Night at the Opera, All About Eve, The Searchers, Breakfast At Tiffany's, North by Northwest, Dinner at Eight, Rebel Without a Cause, Rear Window, Double Indemnity, Mutiny on the Bounty, City Lights, Red River, The Manchurian Candidate, Bringing Up Baby, Singin' in the Rain, To Have and Have Not, Goodbye, Mr. Chips, Roman Holiday, Giant and Jezebel. The style of Classical Hollywood cinema, as elaborated by David Bordwell, has been heavily influenced by the ideas of the Renaissance and its resurgence of mankind as the focal point. Thus, classical narration progresses always through psychological motivation, i.e. by the will of a human character and its struggle with obstacles towards a defined goal. The aspects of space and time are subordinated to the narrative element which is usually composed of two lines of action: A romance intertwined with a more generic one such as business or, in the case of Alfred Hitchcock films, solving a crime. Time in classical Hollywood is continuous, since non-linearity calls attention to the illusory workings of the medium. The only permissible manipulation of time in this format is the flashback. It is mostly used to introduce a memory sequence of a character, e.g. Casablanca. Likewise, the treatment of space in classic Hollywood strives to overcome or conceal the two-dimensionality of film ("invisible style") and is strongly centered upon the human body. The majority of shots in a classical film focus on gestures or facial expressions (medium-long and medium shots). André Bazin once compared classical film to a photographed play in that the events seem to exist objectively and that cameras only give us the best view of the whole play. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_Hollywood_cinema

Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film

Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film

Racism in the United States has been a major issue since the colonial era and the slave era. Legally sanctioned racism imposed a heavy burden on Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latin Americans. European Americans (particularly Anglo Americans) were privileged by law in matters of literacy, immigration, voting rights, citizenship, land acquisition, and criminal procedure over periods of time extending from the 17th century to the 1960s. Many non-Protestant European immigrant groups, particularly American Jews, Irish Americans, Italian Americans, as well as other immigrants from elsewhere, suffered xenophobic exclusion and other forms of discrimination in American society. Major racially structured institutions included slavery, Indian Wars, Native American reservations, segregation, residential schools (for Native Americans), and internment camps. Formal racial discrimination was largely banned in the mid-20th century, and came to be perceived as socially unacceptable and/or morally repugnant as well, yet racial politics remain a major phenomenon. Historical racism continues to be reflected in socio-economic inequality. Racial stratification continues to occur in employment, housing, education, lending, and government. The 20th century saw a hardening of institutionalized racism and legal discrimination against citizens of African descent in the United States. Although technically able to vote, poll taxes, acts of terror (often perpetuated by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in the Reconstruction South), and discriminatory laws such as grandfather clauses kept black Americans disenfranchised particularly in the South but also nationwide following the Hayes election at the end of the Reconstruction era in 1877. In response to de jure racism, protest and lobbyist groups emerged, most notably, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in 1909. This time period is sometimes referred to as the nadir of American race relations because racism in the United States was worse during this time than at any period before or since. Segregation, racial discrimination, and expressions of white supremacy all increased. So did anti-black violence, including lynchings and race riots. In addition, racism which had been viewed primarily as a problem in the Southern states, burst onto the national consciousness following the Great Migration, the relocation of millions of African Americans from their roots in the Southern states to the industrial centers of the North after World War I, particularly in cities such as Boston, Chicago, and New York (Harlem). In northern cities, racial tensions exploded, most violently in Chicago, and lynchings--mob-directed hangings, usually racially motivated—increased dramatically in the 1920s. As a member of the Princeton chapter of the NAACP, Albert Einstein corresponded with W. E. B. Du Bois, and in 1946 Einstein called racism America's "worst disease." The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. They mandated "separate but equal" status for black Americans. In reality, this led to treatment and accommodations that were almost always inferior to those provided to white Americans. The most important laws required that public schools, public places and public transportation, like trains and buses, have separate facilities for whites and blacks. (These Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800-66 Black Codes, which had restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans.) State-sponsored school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act; none were in effect at the end of the 1960s. Segregation continued even after the demise of the Jim Crow laws. Data on house prices and attitudes toward integration from suggest that in the mid-20th century, segregation was a product of collective actions taken by whites to exclude blacks from their neighborhoods. Segregation also took the form of redlining, the practice of denying or increasing the cost of services, such as banking, insurance, access to jobs, access to health care, or even supermarkets to residents in certain, often racially determined, areas. Although in the United States informal discrimination and segregation have always existed, the practice called "redlining" began with the National Housing Act of 1934, which established the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_America

Lesson 6 - Kick-start your Christian life - The Pioneer School

Lesson 6 - Kick-start your Christian life - The Pioneer School

www.TheLastReformation.com To be kick-started is to learn to heal the sick. But it's much more than that. It is a tool that can transform people, cities and countries. See this exciting lesson and be kick-started in your Christian life. http://www.TheLastReformation.com Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/FbRT/

Racism, School Desegregation Laws and the Civil Rights Movement in the United States

Racism, School Desegregation Laws and the Civil Rights Movement in the United States

The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955--1968) refers to the social movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against black Americans and restoring voting rights to them. This article covers the phase of the movement between 1955 and 1968, particularly in the South. The emergence of the Black Power Movement, which lasted roughly from 1966 to 1975, enlarged the aims of the Civil Rights Movement to include racial dignity, economic and political self-sufficiency, and freedom from oppression by white Americans. The movement was characterized by major campaigns of civil resistance. Between 1955 and 1968, acts of nonviolent protest and civil disobedience produced crisis situations between activists and government authorities. Federal, state, and local governments, businesses, and communities often had to respond immediately to these situations that highlighted the inequities faced by African Americans. Forms of protest and/or civil disobedience included boycotts such as the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955--1956) in Alabama; "sit-ins" such as the influential Greensboro sit-ins (1960) in North Carolina; marches, such as the Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama; and a wide range of other nonviolent activities. Noted legislative achievements during this phase of the Civil Rights Movement were passage of Civil Rights Act of 1964, that banned discrimination based on "race, color, religion, or national origin" in employment practices and public accommodations; the Voting Rights Act of 1965, that restored and protected voting rights; the Immigration and Nationality Services Act of 1965, that dramatically opened entry to the U.S. to immigrants other than traditional European groups; and the Fair Housing Act of 1968, that banned discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. African Americans re-entered politics in the South, and across the country young people were inspired to action. Desegregation busing in the United States (also known as forced busing or simply busing) is the practice of assigning and transporting students to schools in such a manner as to redress prior racial segregation of schools, or to overcome the effects of residential segregation on local school demographics. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desegregation_busing_in_the_United_States

President Nixon's First Watergate Speech (April 30, 1973)

President Nixon's First Watergate Speech (April 30, 1973)

President Nixon's televised speech from the White House, defending his office on Watergate charges. With Closed Captions and interactive transcript. Playlist for Richard Nixon: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CD6EF78B400BF224

Nossa Senhora de Fátima e a promessa dos cinco primeiros sábados

Nossa Senhora de Fátima e a promessa dos cinco primeiros sábados

Nossa Senhora de Fátima e a promessa dos cinco primeiros sábados No segredo de Julho, Nossa Senhora dissera: - "Virei pedir a consagração da Rússia ao meu Imaculado Coração e a comunhão reparadora nos primeiros sábados". A mensagem de Fátima não estava, pois, definitivamente encerrada com o ciclo de aparições da Cova da Iria, em 1917. No dia 10 de Dezembro de 1925, a Santíssima Virgem, tendo ao lado o Menino Jesus, sobre uma nuvem luminosa, apareceu à Irmã Lúcia, na sua cela, na Casa das Religiosas Doroteias, em Pontevedra. Pondo-lhe no ombro a mão, mostrou-lhe um coração cercado de espinhos, que tinha na outra mão. O menino Jesus apontava o coração e exortava a vidente com as seguintes palavras: "Tem pena do Coração da tua Santíssima Mãe, que está coberto de espinhos que os homens ingratos a todos os momentos Lhe cravam, sem haver quem faça um acto de reparação para os tirar". A Santíssima Virgem acrescentou: "Olha, minha filha, o meu Coração cercado de espinhos que os homens ingratos a todos os momentos Me cravam com blasfémias e ingratidões. Tu, ao menos, vê de Me consolar, e diz que todos aqueles que durante cinco meses, no primeiro sábado, se confessarem, recebendo a Sagrada Comunhão, rezarem um terço e Me fizerem quinze minutos de companhia, meditando nos quinze mistérios do Rosário com o fim de Me desagravarem, Eu prometo assisti-los na hora da morte com todas as graças necessárias para a salvação dessas almas". No dia 15 de Fevereiro de 1926, o Menino Jesus torna a aparecer à Irmã Lúcia, em Pontevedra no pátio que dá para a rua da mesma Casa das Religiosas Doroteias e perguntou-lhe se já tinha divulgado a devoção à sua Santíssima Mãe. A vidente expôs-lhe as dificuldades apresentadas pelo confessor, e explicou que a Madre Superiora estava pronta a propagá-la, mas que aquele Sacerdote tinha dito que ela só nada podia. Jesus respondeu: - "É verdade que a tua Superiora só nada pode, mas com a minha graça pode tudo". A Irmã Lúcia expôs a dificuldade de algumas pessoas se confessarem ao sábado, e pediu para ser válida a confissão de oito dias. Jesus respondeu: - "Sim, pode ser de muitos mais dias ainda, contanto que, quando Me receberem, estejam em graça e que tenham a intenção de desagravar o Imaculado Coração de Maria". A Irmã Lúcia ainda perguntou pelos que se esquecem de formar a intenção ao confessar-se, ao que Nosso Senhor respondeu: - "Podem formá-la na outra confissão seguinte, aproveitando a primeira ocasião que tiverem de se confessar". Na vigília de 29 para 30 de Maio de 1930, Nosso Senhor falou interiormente à Irmã Lúcia. Nessa ocasião, resolveu ainda outra dificuldade: "Será igualmente aceite a prática desta devoção no domingo seguinte ao primeiro sábado quando os meus Sacerdotes, por justos motivos, assim concederam às almas". (do Livro As aparições de FÁTIMA nos manuscscritos da Irmã Lúcia, de António Augusto Borelli Machado, pág 71 e 72)

Thorium: An energy solution - THORIUM REMIX 2011

Thorium: An energy solution - THORIUM REMIX 2011

http://patreon.com/thorium Thorium is plentiful & can be used to generate energy without creating transuranic wastes. Thorium's capacity as nuclear fuel was discovered during WW II, but ignored because it was unsuitable for making bombs. A liquid-fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) is the optimal approach for harvesting energy from Thorium, and has the potential to solve today's energy/climate crisis. LFTR is a type of Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (Th-MSR). This video summarizes over 6 hours worth of thorium talks given by Kirk Sorensen and other thorium technologists. THORIUM REMIX 2011 starts with a 5 minute TL;WL summary, to hold you over until you find your Ritalin. YouTube Closed Captioning is available in English, and many other languages. To learn more about the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor visit: http://energyfromthorium.com/ See http://THORIUMREMIX.com/ for full list of multimedia source material. Key YouTube video components: Kirk Sorensen @ TEDxYYC http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2vzotsvvkw Kirk Sorensen @ Protospace - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVSmf_qmkbg Kirk Sorensen @ MRU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3rL08J7fDA Kirk Sorensen @ TEAC3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-uxvSVIGtU Kirk Sorensen @ Dr. Kiki Science Hour #84 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEpnpyd-jbw After Fukushima: The Fear Factor - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVQ0NvEcyqw Robert Hargraves @ TEAC3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOoBTufkEog Alexander Cannara @ TEAC3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUVq81kBKyk James Kennedy @ TEAC3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrDeB86YpV4 Q: What is thorium and what makes it special? A: Thorium is a naturally-occuring mineral that holds large amounts of releasable nuclear energy, similar to uranium. This nuclear energy can be released in a special nuclear reactor designed to use thorium. Thorium is special because it is easier to extract this energy completely than uranium due to some of the chemical and nuclear properties of thorium. Q: What is a liquid-fluoride reactor? A: A liquid-fluoride nuclear reactor is different than conventional nuclear reactors that use solid fuel elements. A liquid-fluoride reactor uses a solution of several fluoride salts, typically lithium fluoride, beryllium fluoride, and uranium tetrafluoride, as its basic nuclear fuel. The fluoride salts have a number of advantages over solid fuels. They are impervious to radiation damage, they can be chemically processed in the form that they are in, and they have a high capacity to hold thermal energy (heat). Additional nuclear fuel can be added or withdrawn from the salt solution during normal operation. Q: Are the salts safe? A: Very safe. Unlike other coolants considered for high-performance reactors (like liquid sodium) the salts will not react dangerously with air or water. This is because they are already in their most stable chemical form. Their properties do not change even under intense radiation, unlike all solid forms of nuclear fuel. Q: What is nuclear waste and how does a liquid-fluoride reactor address this issue? A: So-called "nuclear waste" or spent-nuclear fuel is produced in conventional (solid-core) nuclear reactors because they are unable to extract all of the nuclear energy from their fuel before they have to shutdown. LFTR addresses this issue by using a form of nuclear fuel (liquid-fluoride salts of thorium) that allow complete extraction of nuclear energy from the fuel. "Fluid Fuel Reactors", James A. Lane, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, 1958. http://moltensalt.org/references/static/downloads/pdf/

I Can't Stop Drinking Alcohol - Help for Alcoholics Q&A #006

I Can't Stop Drinking Alcohol - Help for Alcoholics Q&A #006

What does it feel like to be Sober - How many times I have heard people say just Imagine what it would be like if you were sober. Imagining being sober isn’t really possible and as you can’t imagine something you have no idea about, never mind what it feels like. https://goo.gl/paXIkw The last time you were really sober was probably in your teens, or many years ago at least or even a short time ago. The feeling of contentment and confidence you took for granted, has been stripped from you and forgotten. Share this video https://youtu.be/FnOJyshp8to It’s like someone jumping out of an airplane, they can explain to you what it feels like, but you will never get that sense and feeling of what it’s really like unless you try it and experience it for yourself. It’s hard for me to imagine the feelings I had when I was in full alcoholic mode and dependent every minute of the day. It was horrible, but still hard to imagine now that I’m s sober. I couldn’t remember what it used to feel like to be sober, but when I was dry for many months, my happiness returned and contentment came back. Their is big risk when you get to this point as the tables turn, what you once knew as an everyday thing (Drinking all day falling around the place feeling depressed and anxious) Has been replaced with good feelings and confidence etc. There is one thing that happens, you intern forget what it was like to be addicted to alcohol (alcoholic alcohol dependent etc.) and all the bad time, this is when it gets tricky. Subscribe - https://goo.gl/paXIkw First of all you start your journey not knowing what it’s like to be sober, then all of a sudden you are completely dry and you have forgot what it feels like to be alcohol dependent. This is like the vicious cycle or back on the hamster wheel. Avoid this part, as you may start and get right back onto the alcohol cycle Most of you will have not been without alcohol for a very long time and won’t be able to remember what it was like being sober, I’m not taking about the being sober for a week. When I mean sober, I mean after you have been sober for many months. What happens is, you forget what all the bad times, the bad feelings stop and start drinking again. ➜ Ask me a Questions https://goo.gl/sj6O8u ➜ Subscribe https://goo.gl/JJJLVB ➜ Watch and Listen to more Videos https://goo.gl/4WUEmv ➜ Share this Video https://youtu.be/FnOJyshp8to ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Social Media:- ➜ Twitter https://goo.gl/H5Jscr ➜ Facebook https://goo.gl/Cw2J4F ➜ YouTube https://goo.gl/U4RBdF ➜ Google+ https://goo.gl/s0wV0f ➜ Pinterest https://goo.gl/M1C1Oq ➜ Tumblr http://goo.gl/n5iFVn

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