Metastatic Melanoma Patient on How He Was Diagnosed

Metastatic Melanoma Patient on How He Was Diagnosed

Tim Shiery of Houston, Texas was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma in August of 2007. He had spots on his brain, lungs, liver, skin and bone.

The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer - Mayo Clinic

The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer - Mayo Clinic

Richard W. Joseph, M.D., medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida talks about the most deadly form of skin cancer, known as melanoma. Here he explains the differences in the four stages of melanoma. View all of our "skin cancer" related videos at: http://bit.ly/SkinCancerVideos Dr. Joseph on twitter: http://twitter.com/RichardWJoseph

Metastatic Melanoma Survivor's Advice

Metastatic Melanoma Survivor's Advice

http://bit.ly/GARkYd Tim Shiery of Houston, Texas was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma in August of 2007. He had spots on his brain, lungs, liver, skin and bone. After a roller coaster ride which included surgery, chemotherapy and TIL Cell therapy, Shiery is now a metastatic melanoma cancer survivor. Listen to this metastatic melanoma cancer survivor's encouraging words of advice.

Melanoma brain metastases

Melanoma brain metastases

In this episode of Cancer Newsline, we discuss melanoma when it metastasizes to the brain and the types of therapies used to treat melanoma brain metastases. Learn more about melanoma: https://www.mdanderson.org/cancer-types/melanoma.html Request an appointment at MD Anderson by calling 1-877-632-6789 or online at: https://my.mdanderson.org/RequestAppointment?cmpid=youtube_appointment_melanoma

Why Cancers Spread to the Brain

Why Cancers Spread to the Brain

A feature of advanced cancer is its movement to other parts of the body. Called metastatic or stage 4 cancer, different forms of disease tend to migrate to certain places. "And one of the favorite organs of the body where cancers can spread to is the brain," says Dr. Constantine Mantz, radiation oncologist on Lee Memorial Health System's medical staff. When a brain tumor is discovered, the first thing doctors do is determine its origin - whether it started in the brain, as brain cancer, or came from somewhere else. "For example, we order an MRI on a patient, we see that there's not just one tumor but there's a number of them and they're scattered throughout the brain- that typically represents a metastatic cancer. That's one that has seeded the brain in a number of areas within it from some source outside of the brain," says Dr. Mantz. Why the brain? It has to do with our plumbing. "The brain consumes about 25% of all the oxygen that our body takes in, and in order to consume that much oxygen to do all of its functioning and work its needs to have a pretty healthy blood supply. And in part because that really dense blood supply is a favorite place for metastasis," says Dr. Mantz. About a quarter of all cancers that spread through the body will go to the brain. Metastatic brain tumors are more common than tumors that actually start in the brain. Some of the most common forms are breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, and kidney cancer. Treating it can involve surgery and radiation. Advanced radiation techniques are helping patients by delivering precise, high dose radiation to hard to reach tumors. "We will use specifically this stereotactic radiotherapy to treat challenging, difficult tumors in the brain, tumors that otherwise wrap themselves around critical structures that we want to avoid. Whereas in the recent years past we just could not offer a effective or safe treatment for them," says Dr. Mantz. As more in known about cancers and how they behave, doctors can find better ways to treat it or detect it in it's earliest stage. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

When cancer spreads to the brain

When cancer spreads to the brain

Download from iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/when-cancer-spreads-to-brain/id431848216?i=168965396 Several cancer types can spread to the brain including lung, breast, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal tract cancers such as colon and rectal. Secondary brain cancer (cancer that has metastasized to the brain) is more prevalent than cancer beginning in the brain (primary cancer). Ivo Tremont, M.D., assistant professor in Neuro-Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses how cancer migrates to the brain, how it differs from primary brain cancer, as well as secondary brain cancer treatment and research.

Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma: Could Timing Be Everything?

Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma: Could Timing Be Everything?

Svetomir Markovic, M.D., Ph.D., explains how his research at the Mayo Clinic, which is focused on understanding opportunities to integrate different systemic treatment modalities into more-effective therapies for advanced melanoma.

Cancer Treatment for Brain Metastasis | #UCLAMDChat Webinar

Cancer Treatment for Brain Metastasis | #UCLAMDChat Webinar

UCLA neurosurgeon Isaac Yang, MD, discusses treatments for single and multiple metastatic brain cancer. He also discusses and compares whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiosurgery, conventional surgery and other recommended treatment options. Learn more about UCLA Neurology at http://neurosurgery.ucla.edu Learn more about Isaac Yang, MD at http://uclahealth.org/IsaacYang

Immunotherapy clinical trial keeps melanoma survivor cancer-free

Immunotherapy clinical trial keeps melanoma survivor cancer-free

Karlee Steele had beaten melanoma twice, once in 2011 and again in 2013, so she was shocked when a year-and-a-half later, she found a swollen node under her arm. After a needle biopsy, she was told the cancer wasn’t outside her skin, but inside, in the nodes under her right arm. It was stage III melanoma. It originated from her second melanoma in 2013. It was so aggressive that it traveled into her lymph nodes where it stayed silent for almost two years. Karlee decided to have surgery at MD Anderson. Following surgery, she enrolled in an immunotherapy vaccine clinical trial. Over time, the immunotherapy worked, gradually shrinking and ultimately eliminating the melanoma. Today, Karlee is cancer-free, no longer in treatment and grateful to have her life back. She credits MD Anderson's Melanoma Moon Shot Program as the driving force to choosing MD Anderson. Read more about Karlee https://www.mdanderson.org/publications/cancerwise/2016/11/melanoma-immunotherapy-clinical-trial.html. Request an appointment at MD Anderson by calling 1-877-632-6789 or online at: https://my.mdanderson.org/RequestAppointment?cmpid=youtube_appointment_melanoma_clinicaltrial

Alexander Jones: Alex's Story - Brain Tumor (Melanoma) and CyberKnife

Alexander Jones: Alex's Story - Brain Tumor (Melanoma) and CyberKnife

In this patient testimonial, Alexander Jones talks about his experience with melanoma cancer and the CyberKnife Treatment. Alexander Jones has melanoma cancer. It started off with a constant headache for three days that would not go away. He finally made his way to the emergency room where a biopsy of a lymph node on his neck showed melanoma and was told he had a brain tumor. His doctor told Alexander about the CyberKnife method and having gone through four sessions, he explains the process as painless and experiencing no side effects. It has been an awesome experience for Alexander and feels fortunate that CyberKnife was offered to him. For more information about radiation oncology at Swedish, please visit http://www.swedish.org/Services/Radiosurgery-Center

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