The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer - Mayo Clinic

The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer - Mayo Clinic

Richard W. Joseph, M.D., medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida talks about the most deadly form of skin cancer, known as melanoma. Here he explains the differences in the four stages of melanoma. View all of our "skin cancer" related videos at: http://bit.ly/SkinCancerVideos Dr. Joseph on twitter: http://twitter.com/RichardWJoseph

Metastatic Melanoma Patient on How He Was Diagnosed

Metastatic Melanoma Patient on How He Was Diagnosed

Tim Shiery of Houston, Texas was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma in August of 2007. He had spots on his brain, lungs, liver, skin and bone.

Melanoma brain metastases

Melanoma brain metastases

In this episode of Cancer Newsline, we discuss melanoma when it metastasizes to the brain and the types of therapies used to treat melanoma brain metastases. Learn more about melanoma: https://www.mdanderson.org/cancer-types/melanoma.html Request an appointment at MD Anderson by calling 1-877-632-6789 or online at: https://my.mdanderson.org/RequestAppointment?cmpid=youtube_appointment_melanoma

Why Cancers Spread to the Brain

Why Cancers Spread to the Brain

A feature of advanced cancer is its movement to other parts of the body. Called metastatic or stage 4 cancer, different forms of disease tend to migrate to certain places. "And one of the favorite organs of the body where cancers can spread to is the brain," says Dr. Constantine Mantz, radiation oncologist on Lee Memorial Health System's medical staff. When a brain tumor is discovered, the first thing doctors do is determine its origin - whether it started in the brain, as brain cancer, or came from somewhere else. "For example, we order an MRI on a patient, we see that there's not just one tumor but there's a number of them and they're scattered throughout the brain- that typically represents a metastatic cancer. That's one that has seeded the brain in a number of areas within it from some source outside of the brain," says Dr. Mantz. Why the brain? It has to do with our plumbing. "The brain consumes about 25% of all the oxygen that our body takes in, and in order to consume that much oxygen to do all of its functioning and work its needs to have a pretty healthy blood supply. And in part because that really dense blood supply is a favorite place for metastasis," says Dr. Mantz. About a quarter of all cancers that spread through the body will go to the brain. Metastatic brain tumors are more common than tumors that actually start in the brain. Some of the most common forms are breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, and kidney cancer. Treating it can involve surgery and radiation. Advanced radiation techniques are helping patients by delivering precise, high dose radiation to hard to reach tumors. "We will use specifically this stereotactic radiotherapy to treat challenging, difficult tumors in the brain, tumors that otherwise wrap themselves around critical structures that we want to avoid. Whereas in the recent years past we just could not offer a effective or safe treatment for them," says Dr. Mantz. As more in known about cancers and how they behave, doctors can find better ways to treat it or detect it in it's earliest stage. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma: Could Timing Be Everything?

Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma: Could Timing Be Everything?

Svetomir Markovic, M.D., Ph.D., explains how his research at the Mayo Clinic, which is focused on understanding opportunities to integrate different systemic treatment modalities into more-effective therapies for advanced melanoma.

Skin Metastasis Lung, Colon, Melanoma, Renal

Skin Metastasis Lung, Colon, Melanoma, Renal

LUNG Historically, lung carcinoma is more common in men than women. There is a localized cluster of cutaneous non-specific nodules, most often on the anterior chest or abdomen. The diagnosis of lung cancer usually precedes the diagnosis of metastasis to the skin. COLON AND RECTAL Colon and rectal carcinoma is the second most common source of skin metastases in both genders. It usually presents late in the disease course. The abdomen and perineum are the most common sites. Less commonly, it may present as inflammatory metastatic carcinoma of the inguinal folds or as a chronic cutaneous fistula. MELANOMA Melanoma is the third most common cause of metastasis to the skin. Melanoma typically invades the liver, lungs and brain but may also show up at distant cutaneous sites. Skin is the most common primary site of melanoma, followed by ocular and mucosal sites. There are cases of systemic or metastatic melanoma without a primary cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma that is metastatic to the skin typically appears as small 2-5 mm blue papules resembling blue berries. Hundreds of lesions may be present in advanced cases. RENAL CELL CARCINOMA Renal cell carcinoma comprises 7.0 % of all cutaneous metastases. It is notorious for presenting as a scalp nodule and most commonly presents on the head and neck region. A well-circumscribed, bluish nodule with prominent vascularity is a typical presentation.

Mole Misdiagnosis: When It's Really Stage IV Skin Cancer

Mole Misdiagnosis: When It's Really Stage IV Skin Cancer

Erin Youngerberg noticed a small mole, the size of a pencil eraser, on her back. She was told not to worry. But it was stage IV melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer. Doctors went on to find tumors all over her body. This is her story. Everyday Health is your No. 1 resource for health and wellness advice. We make it fun and easy to live a healthier, happier lifestyle. Subscribe now and start feeling better — every day. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1LhozPy VISIT EVERYDAYHEALTH.COM: http://bit.ly/1taqdKn FOLLOW US: Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1o7gqo2 Twitter: http://bit.ly/1jx2ldL Instagram: http://bit.ly/1Nj3Z0Q Pinterest: http://bit.ly/1CNxcNO

Valerie's Story: Valerie shares how she beat her malignant melanoma

Valerie's Story: Valerie shares how she beat her malignant melanoma

Valerie knew she had a mole on her neck. What she didn't notice, however, was that the mole was getting bigger. Valerie went to her pediatrician who then recommended she visit a dermatologist. The dermatologist removed the mole and sent it off to be tested. When the results came back, Valerie and her mother were shocked: it was malignant melanoma. In other words, skin cancer. Valerie came to Nationwide Children's and went into surgery shortly thereafter. After surgery, the team of oncologists and surgeons were happy to report that Valerie was cancer free. Meet more of our patients and read their success stories here: http://bit.ly/GNScMG. Learn more about our melanoma clinic (here: http://bit.ly/GNSbIr) and our team of cancer doctors (here: http://bit.ly/GNScw0). For general information about our cancer program, visit our Web site: http://bit.ly/GNSbZ9 To request an appointment or services, please click here to provide us some information: http://bit.ly/GNT9o4

Cancer Treatment for Brain Metastasis | #UCLAMDChat Webinar

Cancer Treatment for Brain Metastasis | #UCLAMDChat Webinar

UCLA neurosurgeon Isaac Yang, MD, discusses treatments for single and multiple metastatic brain cancer. He also discusses and compares whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiosurgery, conventional surgery and other recommended treatment options. Learn more about UCLA Neurology at http://neurosurgery.ucla.edu Learn more about Isaac Yang, MD at http://uclahealth.org/IsaacYang

When cancer spreads to the brain

When cancer spreads to the brain

Download from iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/when-cancer-spreads-to-brain/id431848216?i=168965396 Several cancer types can spread to the brain including lung, breast, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal tract cancers such as colon and rectal. Secondary brain cancer (cancer that has metastasized to the brain) is more prevalent than cancer beginning in the brain (primary cancer). Ivo Tremont, M.D., assistant professor in Neuro-Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses how cancer migrates to the brain, how it differs from primary brain cancer, as well as secondary brain cancer treatment and research.

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