21 September 2011 Corporation for Enterprise Development rings the NYSE Opening Bell

21 September 2011 Corporation for Enterprise Development rings the NYSE Opening Bell

Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), a national nonprofit company focused on developing and strengthening programs that address the growing wealth disparities in our country, visited the NYSE. In honor of the occasion, President Andrea Levere rang The Opening BellSM. Interview by NYSE Anthony Drizis About CFED: CFED (http://www.cfed.org) expands economic opportunity by helping Americans start and grow businesses, go to college, own a home and save for their children's and own economic futures. We identify promising ideas, test and refine them in communities to find out what works, craft policies and products to help good ideas reach scale, and develop partnerships to promote lasting change. We bring together community practice, public policy and private markets in new and effective ways to achieve greater economic impact. Established in 1979 as the Corporation for Enterprise Development, CFED works nationally and internationally through its offices in Washington, DC; Durham, North Carolina; and San Francisco, California. Interview by Anthony Drizis

Tuesday's Children Visits the New York Stock Exchange ring the NYSE Closing Bell

Tuesday's Children Visits the New York Stock Exchange ring the NYSE Closing Bell

On Tuesday, September 11, Tuesday's Children Board Member Bert McCooey, joined by family members of September 11th victims, and by some of the organization's corporate partners including Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Guy Carpenter & Company LLC, Marsh & McLennan Companies, AON Corporation, and Keefe, Bruyette, and Woods will visit the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) to commemorate the eleventh anniversary of September 11th and ring The Closing Bell. Interview by Anthony Drizis To mark this occasion, Rudy Giuliani, Former Mayor of NYC, Bert McCooey, Board Member and former Chairman of Tuesday's Children and David Weild, present Chairman of Tuesday's Children will ring The Closing Bell. About Tuesday's Children: With a focus on family resiliency and strength through community, Tuesday's Children, in partnership with recognized leaders in the fields of child development, family advocacy and mentoring initiatives has developed an innovative platform of programs designed to address the ongoing needs of thousands of children coping with one of the worst tragedies in the history of our nation. Project Common Bond is Tuesday's Children's important initiative fostering healing, collaboration and leadership. Project Common Bond participants learn to acknowledge and respect differences, acquire conflict resolution skills and engage in peace-building and community service activities. Through this unique international community, Tuesday's Children will create global ambassadors working toward peace and service. (Source: Tuesday's Children)

The Rich in America: Power, Control, Wealth and the Elite Upper Class in the United States

The Rich in America: Power, Control, Wealth and the Elite Upper Class in the United States

The American upper class describes the sociological concept pertaining to the "top layer" of society in the United States. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0078026717/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0078026717&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=2eb8359867676703c845d545981030e7 This social class is most commonly described as consisting of those with great wealth and power and may also be referred to as the Capitalist Class or simply as The Rich. Persons of this class commonly have immense influence in the nation's political and economic institutions as well as public opinion. Many politicians, heirs to fortunes, top business executives, CEOs, successful venture capitalists and celebrities are considered members of this class. Some prominent and high-rung professionals may also be included if they attain great influence and wealth. The main distinguishing feature of this class, which is estimated to constitute roughly 1% of the population, is the source of income. While the vast majority of persons and households derive their income from salaries, those in the upper class derive their income from investments and capital gains. Estimates for the size of this group commonly vary from 1% to 2%, while some surveys have indicated that as many as 6% of Americans identify as "upper class." Sociologist Leonard Beeghley sees wealth as the only significant distinguishing feature of this class and, therefore, refers to this group simply as "the rich." " "The members of the tiny capitalist class at the top of the hierarchy have an influence on economy and society far beyond their numbers. They make investment decisions that open or close employment opportunities for millions of others. They contribute money to political parties, and they often own media enterprises that allow them influence over the thinking of other classes... The capitalist class strives to perpetuate itself: Assets, lifestyles, values and social networks... are all passed from one generation to the next." -Dennis Gilbert, The American Class Structure, 1998 " Sociologists such as W. Lloyd Warner, William Thompson and Joseph Hickey recognize prestige differences between members of the upper class. Established families, prominent professionals and politicians may be deemed to have more prestige than some entertainment celebrities who in turn may have more prestige than the members of local elites. Yet, contemporary sociologists argue that all members of the upper class share such great wealth, influence and assets as their main source of income as to be recognized as members of the same social class. As great financial fortune is the main distinguishing feature of this class, sociologist Leonard Beeghley at the University of Florida identifies all "rich" households, those with incomes in the top 1% or so, as upper class. Functional theorists in sociology and economics assert that the existence of social classes is necessary in order to distribute persons so that only the most qualified are able to acquire positions of power, and so that all persons fulfill their occupational duties to the greatest extent of their ability. Notably, this view does not address wealth, which plays an important role in allocating status and power. In order to make sure that important and complex tasks are handled by qualified and motivated personnel, society offers incentives such as income and prestige. The more scarce qualified applicants are and the more essential the given task is, the larger the incentive will be. Income and prestige which are often used to tell a person's social class, are merely the incentives given to that person for meeting all qualifications to complete an important task that is of high standing in society due to its functional value. "It should be stressed... that a position does not bring power and prestige because it draws a high income. Rather, it draws a high income because it is functionally important and the available personnel is for one reason or another scarce. It is therefore superficial and erroneous to regard high income as the cause of a man's power and prestige, just as it is erroneous to think that a man's fever is the cause of his disease... The economic source of power and prestige is not income primarily, but the ownership of capital goods (including patents, good will, and professional reputation). Such ownership should be distinguished from the possession of consumers' goods, which is an index rather than a cause of social standing." -Kingsley Davis and Wilbert E. Moore, Principles of Stratification. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_upper_class

Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film

Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film

Racism in the United States has been a major issue since the colonial era and the slave era. Legally sanctioned racism imposed a heavy burden on Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latin Americans. European Americans (particularly Anglo Americans) were privileged by law in matters of literacy, immigration, voting rights, citizenship, land acquisition, and criminal procedure over periods of time extending from the 17th century to the 1960s. Many non-Protestant European immigrant groups, particularly American Jews, Irish Americans, Italian Americans, as well as other immigrants from elsewhere, suffered xenophobic exclusion and other forms of discrimination in American society. Major racially structured institutions included slavery, Indian Wars, Native American reservations, segregation, residential schools (for Native Americans), and internment camps. Formal racial discrimination was largely banned in the mid-20th century, and came to be perceived as socially unacceptable and/or morally repugnant as well, yet racial politics remain a major phenomenon. Historical racism continues to be reflected in socio-economic inequality. Racial stratification continues to occur in employment, housing, education, lending, and government. The 20th century saw a hardening of institutionalized racism and legal discrimination against citizens of African descent in the United States. Although technically able to vote, poll taxes, acts of terror (often perpetuated by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in the Reconstruction South), and discriminatory laws such as grandfather clauses kept black Americans disenfranchised particularly in the South but also nationwide following the Hayes election at the end of the Reconstruction era in 1877. In response to de jure racism, protest and lobbyist groups emerged, most notably, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in 1909. This time period is sometimes referred to as the nadir of American race relations because racism in the United States was worse during this time than at any period before or since. Segregation, racial discrimination, and expressions of white supremacy all increased. So did anti-black violence, including lynchings and race riots. In addition, racism which had been viewed primarily as a problem in the Southern states, burst onto the national consciousness following the Great Migration, the relocation of millions of African Americans from their roots in the Southern states to the industrial centers of the North after World War I, particularly in cities such as Boston, Chicago, and New York (Harlem). In northern cities, racial tensions exploded, most violently in Chicago, and lynchings--mob-directed hangings, usually racially motivated—increased dramatically in the 1920s. As a member of the Princeton chapter of the NAACP, Albert Einstein corresponded with W. E. B. Du Bois, and in 1946 Einstein called racism America's "worst disease." The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. They mandated "separate but equal" status for black Americans. In reality, this led to treatment and accommodations that were almost always inferior to those provided to white Americans. The most important laws required that public schools, public places and public transportation, like trains and buses, have separate facilities for whites and blacks. (These Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800-66 Black Codes, which had restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans.) State-sponsored school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act; none were in effect at the end of the 1960s. Segregation continued even after the demise of the Jim Crow laws. Data on house prices and attitudes toward integration from suggest that in the mid-20th century, segregation was a product of collective actions taken by whites to exclude blacks from their neighborhoods. Segregation also took the form of redlining, the practice of denying or increasing the cost of services, such as banking, insurance, access to jobs, access to health care, or even supermarkets to residents in certain, often racially determined, areas. Although in the United States informal discrimination and segregation have always existed, the practice called "redlining" began with the National Housing Act of 1934, which established the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_America

Siemens Distinguished Lecture Series - The Future and Trends in Corporate Defense

Siemens Distinguished Lecture Series - The Future and Trends in Corporate Defense

October 31, 2014 In light of the latest news reports of the theft of billions of Americans' identities from corporate servers, how can corporations make sure they won't be the next ones in the news? How will changes in the way businesses and their customers access the internet change their security needs? What are the security challenges involved with cloud computing and mobile commerce? Douglas Huber is an assistant professor at Lorain County Community College, an adjunct professor at Akron Summit College and an expert in network engineering and security. The Siemens Distinguished Lecture Series in Engineering, Manufacturing and Entrepreneurship is presented through a generous donation from the Building Technologies Division of Siemens Industry Inc.

Ian Macdonald

Ian Macdonald

Summer School 2015 / Ysgol Haf 2015 Tuesday / Dydd Mawrth Summer School is an intensive, five-day residential learning experience bringing together leaders and managers to address key issues on a specific leadership topic. Mae'r Ysgol Haf yn brofiad dysgu preswyl dwys dros bum diwrnod a fydd yn dwyn ynghyd arweinwyr a rheolwyr i drafod materion allweddol sydd ynghlwm â phwnc arwain penodol

Occupy w/ Russell Simmons, Citizens United & HIV Wrestler (The Point)

Occupy w/ Russell Simmons, Citizens United & HIV Wrestler (The Point)

Points from Russell Simmons on Occupy The Dream and Ilyse Hogue (writer, The Nation) on the surprise upside of Citizens United are discussed by Patrick Meighan (writer, Family Guy), Manjusha Kulkarni (exe. director, South Asian Network), Robin D.G. Kelley (American History Professor -UCLA), and Cenk Uygur (host, The Young Turks). They also discuss the prison sentence for wrestler Andre Davis who was found guilty of possibly infecting numerous women with HIV. Watch More Points: http://www.youtube.com/townsquare The original WCPO report: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk2uoyUEETA Get Involved: http://www.occupythedream.org/ Russell Simmons Global Grind site: http://globalgrind.com/ Patrick Meighan of on Occupy: http://myoccupylaarrest.blogspot.com/ South Asian Network: http://southasiannetwork.org/ Robin D.G. Kelley: http://www.monkbook.com/ Cenk on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/cenkuygur Support The Point for FREE by doing your Amazon shopping through this link (bookmark it!) http://www.amazon.com/?tag=townsquaretyt-20

America's Missing Children Documentary

America's Missing Children Documentary

A missing person is a person who has disappeared for usually unknown reasons. Missing persons' photographs may be posted on bulletin boards, milk cartons, postcards, and websites, along with a phone number to be contacted if a sighting has been made. People disappear for many reasons. Some individuals choose to disappear alone; most of these soon return. Reasons for non-identification may include: To escape child abuse, such as child physical abuse, emotional abuse, by a parent(s) / guardian(s) / sibling(s) (especially). Leaving home to live somewhere else under a new identity. Becoming the victim of kidnapping. Abduction (of a minor) by a non-custodial parent or other relative. Seizure by government officials without due process of law. Suicide in a remote location or under an assumed name (to spare their families the suicide at home, or to allow their deaths to be eventually declared in absentia). Victim of murder (body disguised, destroyed, or hidden). Mental illness or other ailments such as Alzheimer's Disease can cause someone to become lost, or they may not know how to identify themselves due to long term memory loss that causes them to forget where they live, the identity of family members or relatives or even their own names. Death by natural causes (disease) or accident far from home without identification. Disappearance in order to take advantage of better employment or living conditions elsewhere. Sold into slavery, serfdom, sexual servitude, or other unfree labour. To avoid discovery of a crime or apprehension by law-enforcement authorities. (See also failure to appear). Joining a cult or other religious organization. To escape domestic abuse. To avoid war or persecution during a genocide. To escape famine or natural disaster. By the end of 2005, there were 109,531 active missing person records according to the US Department of Justice. Children under the age of 18 account for 58,081 (53.03%) of the records and 11,868 (10.84%) were for young adults between the ages of 18 and 20. During 2005, 834,536 entries were made into the National Crime Information Center's missing person file, which was an increase of 0.51% from the 830,325 entered in 2004. Missing Person records that were cleared or canceled during the same period totaled 844,838. The reasons for these removals include: a law enforcement agency located the subject, the individual returned home, or the record had to be removed by the entering agency due to a determination that the record is invalid. A common misconception is that a person must be absent for at least 24 hours before being legally classed as missing, but this is rarely the case; in instances where there is evidence of violence or of an unusual absence, law enforcement agencies often stress the importance of beginning an investigation promptly. In most common law jurisdictions a missing person can be declared dead in absentia (or "legally dead") after seven years. This time frame may be reduced in certain cases, such as deaths in major battles or mass disasters such as the September 11, 2001 attacks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_children

Classic Movie Bloopers and Mistakes: Film Stars Uncensored - 1930s and 1940s Outtakes

Classic Movie Bloopers and Mistakes: Film Stars Uncensored - 1930s and 1940s Outtakes

Classical Hollywood cinema or the classical Hollywood narrative, are terms used in film history which designate both a visual and sound style for making motion pictures and a mode of production used in the American film industry between 1917 and 1960. More bloopers: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=2e2330f57788ff94fc8dbab62c46051c&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=classic%20movie%20bloopers This period is often referred to as the "Golden Age of Hollywood." An identifiable cinematic form emerged during this period called classical Hollywood style. Classical style is fundamentally built on the principle of continuity editing or "invisible" style. That is, the camera and the sound recording should never call attention to themselves (as they might in films from earlier periods, other countries or in a modernist or postmodernist work). Throughout the early 1930s, risque films and salacious advertising, became widespread in the short period known as Pre-Code Hollywood. MGM dominated the industry and had the top stars in Hollywood, and was also credited for creating the Hollywood star system altogether. MGM stars included at various times "King of Hollywood" Clark Gable, Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Jean Harlow, Gary Cooper, Mary Pickford, Henry Fonda, Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Judy Garland, Ava Gardner, James Stewart, Katharine Hepburn, Vivien Leigh, Grace Kelly, Gene Kelly, Gloria Stuart, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, John Wayne, Barbara Stanwyck, John Barrymore, Audrey Hepburn and Buster Keaton. Another great achievement of American cinema during this era came through Walt Disney's animation. In 1937, Disney created the most successful film of its time, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Many film historians have remarked upon the many great works of cinema that emerged from this period of highly regimented film-making. One reason this was possible is that, with so many movies being made, not every one had to be a big hit. A studio could gamble on a medium-budget feature with a good script and relatively unknown actors: Citizen Kane, directed by Orson Welles and often regarded as the greatest film of all time, fits that description. In other cases, strong-willed directors like Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock and Frank Capra battled the studios in order to achieve their artistic visions. The apogee of the studio system may have been the year 1939, which saw the release of such classics as The Wizard of Oz, Gone with the Wind, Stagecoach, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Destry Rides Again,Young Mr. Lincoln, Wuthering Heights, Only Angels Have Wings, Ninotchka, Babes in Arms, Gunga Din, and The Roaring Twenties. Among the other films from the Golden Age period that are now considered to be classics: Casablanca, The Adventures of Robin Hood, It's a Wonderful Life, It Happened One Night, King Kong, Citizen Kane, Swing Time, Some Like It Hot, A Night at the Opera, All About Eve, The Searchers, Breakfast At Tiffany's, North by Northwest, Dinner at Eight, Rebel Without a Cause, Rear Window, Double Indemnity, Mutiny on the Bounty, City Lights, Red River, The Manchurian Candidate, Bringing Up Baby, Singin' in the Rain, To Have and Have Not, Goodbye, Mr. Chips, Roman Holiday, Giant and Jezebel. The style of Classical Hollywood cinema, as elaborated by David Bordwell, has been heavily influenced by the ideas of the Renaissance and its resurgence of mankind as the focal point. Thus, classical narration progresses always through psychological motivation, i.e. by the will of a human character and its struggle with obstacles towards a defined goal. The aspects of space and time are subordinated to the narrative element which is usually composed of two lines of action: A romance intertwined with a more generic one such as business or, in the case of Alfred Hitchcock films, solving a crime. Time in classical Hollywood is continuous, since non-linearity calls attention to the illusory workings of the medium. The only permissible manipulation of time in this format is the flashback. It is mostly used to introduce a memory sequence of a character, e.g. Casablanca. Likewise, the treatment of space in classic Hollywood strives to overcome or conceal the two-dimensionality of film ("invisible style") and is strongly centered upon the human body. The majority of shots in a classical film focus on gestures or facial expressions (medium-long and medium shots). André Bazin once compared classical film to a photographed play in that the events seem to exist objectively and that cameras only give us the best view of the whole play. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_Hollywood_cinema

How Money Controls Politics: Thomas Ferguson Interview

How Money Controls Politics: Thomas Ferguson Interview

Thomas Ferguson (born 1949) is an American political scientist and author who studies and writes on politics and economics, often within a historical perspective. He is a political science professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston and a member of the advisory board for George Soros' Institute for New Economic Thinking. He obtained his Ph.D. from Princeton University. A contributing editor for The Nation and a contributing writer to The Huffington Post, he is a frequent guest and economic commentator on numerous radio and television programs. He is known for his investment theory of party competition. According to Noam Chomsky, Thomas Ferguson was warned while at MIT that his research might get him denied tenure at the Political Science Department. In Chomsky's account, Ferguson was told "If you ever want to get tenure in this department, keep away from anything after the New Deal; you can write all of your radical stuff up to the New Deal, but if you try and do it for the post-New Deal period, you're never going to get tenure in this department." Although not explicitly mentioned, the research was ostensibly the investment theory of party competition. The Investment theory of party competition (sometimes called the Investment theory of politics) is a political theory developed by University of Massachusetts Boston professor Thomas Ferguson. The theory focuses on how business elites, not voters, play the leading part in political systems. The theory offers an alternative to the conventional, voter-focused, political alignment theory and Median voter theorem which has been criticized by Ferguson, et al. The theory states that, since money driven political systems are expensive and burdensome to ordinary voters, policy is created by competing coalitions of investors, not voters. According to the theory, political parties (and the issues they campaign on) are created entirely for business interests, separated by the interests of numerous factors such as labor-intensive and capital-intensive, and free market and protectionist businesses. In rare cases, labor unions sometimes act as major investors such as with the creation of the Labour Party in Britain, but are generally overshadowed by corporations. However, this is different from a corporatist system in which elite interests come together and bargain to create policy. In the investment theory, political parties act as the political arms of these business groups and therefore don't typically try to reconcile for policy. Within this framework, the Democratic Party is generally said to favor internationalist capital-intensive businesses (along with labor unions) while the Republican Party favors nationalist, anti-union, labor-intensive businesses. Labor-intensive investors made up much of the early political systems in the 18th and 19th centuries. Industries such as textiles, rubber and steel favor economic protectionism with high tariffs and subsidies. Since these businesses are mainly responsible for their domestic market, they are opposed to a Laissez-faire economy open to foreign competition. These industries are also heavily against labor unions since unionization increases the price of their goods. This is said to be responsible for the anti-union policies throughout much of the 18th and 19th centuries when these businesses controlled much of the economy. Due to industrialization and new markets in the 20th century, capital-intensive investors became the new economic order after the realignment of the Great Depression. Industries such as oil, banks, tobacco (and General Electric) along with labor formed the New Deal Coalition. Capital-intensive industries have almost no percent of their value added based on labor and are therefore open to unionization, which, Ferguson states, is why pro-labor policies such as the Wagner Act were passed under the New Deal. These investors also favor international competition and reduced tariffs which is said to have led to the Reciprocal Tariff Act (in response to the Smoot-Hawley Act). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Ferguson_%28academic%29 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Investment_theory_of_party_competition

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