C-SPAN Cities Tour - Billings: Battle of the Little Bighorn

C-SPAN Cities Tour - Billings: Battle of the Little Bighorn

Hear the stories of Custer's last stand as the U.S. Army's 7th Cavalry fought against the Sioux and Cheyenne. See the battlefield that looks almost as it did on June 25, 1876, and hear what happened that day from site interpreter Steve Adelson. Visit: http;//www.c-span.org/LocalContent/Billings

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Recorded July 17, 2014 Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25 and 26, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana. From: http://timvp.com

Little Bighorn Battlefield Custer's Last Stand Tour

Little Bighorn Battlefield Custer's Last Stand Tour

Tour based on the Official National Park Handbook, by Robert M. Utley, and the Official Map. Additional info at http://www.nps.gov/libi/index.htm. Created on August 9, 2010 using FlipShare.

The Battle at Little Bighorn | History

The Battle at Little Bighorn | History

In 1876, General Custer and members of several Plains Indian tribes, including Crazy Horse and Chief Gall, battled in eastern Montana in what would become known as Custer's Last Stand. Check out exclusive HISTORY content: Website - http://www.history.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Episode 1 Custer's Last Man: The Battle at Little Bighorn Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays, get the best of HISTORY with exclusive videos on our most popular topics. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Visitor Center Montana - August 2012

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Visitor Center Montana - August 2012

The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Visitor Center in Montana. Filmed during our vacation in August 2012. Please share on Facebook if you like, or subscribe. A ThomasEpicJourney production. http://mountainriderthomas.com/

the battle of the Little Bighorn in 6 minutes

the battle of the Little Bighorn in 6 minutes

Custer's Last Stand in 6 minutes. http://www.custerwest.org

Little Bighorn Battlefield, MT

Little Bighorn Battlefield, MT

Located in Montana, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument memorializes the site of the Battle of the Little Bighorn which took place on June 25--26, 1876, between the United States Seventh Cavalry regiment led by Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer, and the Sioux and Cheyenne.

Little Bighorn Camp market

Little Bighorn Camp market

Location where Custer divided his command on June 25, 1876

Is this Bird a Living Dinosaur?

Is this Bird a Living Dinosaur?

Please SUBSCRIBE NOW! http://bit.ly/BWchannel Watch More - http://bit.ly/BTpfalcon On this episode of Breaking Trail, Coyote has the opportunity to get face to face with a modern day Dinosaur, the Cassowary! The Southern Cassowary is endangered in its native range of Papua New Guinea and Northern Australia and is regarded as one of the most prehistoric species of bird on the planet. Just one look at their scaly feet or prominent helmet like casque will have you convinced you’ve traveled back in time...or that you've landed right in the middle of a Jurassic Park movie set! Big thanks to Ryan Prentice and all of the staff at Jungle Island for hosting the crew and making this episode possible. Breaking Trail leaves the map behind and follows adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they encounter a variety of wildlife in the most amazing environments on the planet! The Brave Wilderness Channel is your one stop connection to a wild world of adventure and amazing up close animal encounters! Follow along with adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they lead you on three exciting expedition series - Emmy Award Winning Breaking Trail, Dragon Tails and Coyote’s Backyard - featuring everything from Grizzly Bears and Crocodiles to Rattlesnakes and Tarantulas…each episode offers an opportunity to learn something new. So SUBSCRIBE NOW and join the adventure that brings you closer to the most beloved, bizarre and misunderstood creatures known to man! GET READY...things are about to get WILD! New Episodes Every Tuesday and Friday at 9AM EST Subscribe Now! https://www.youtube.com/BraveWilderness Find more info at: https://www.CoyotePeterson.com Coyote Peterson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson G+: https://plus.google.com/100310803754690323805/about

Forensic science pair dissect Battle of Little Bighorn at MTSU

Forensic science pair dissect Battle of Little Bighorn at MTSU

A pair of forensic scientists who've studied the 1876 clash on the shores of the Little Bighorn River in south central Montana delivered a special lecture on the MTSU campus Thursday, March 27, with archaeological evidence that tells a more complete story. Drs. Douglas D. Scott and P. Willey delivered the MTSU's William M. Bass Legends in Forensic Science Lectureship, "Bullets and Bones from the Battle of the Little Bighorn," in the Tennessee Room of MTSU's James Union Building. MTSU's Forensic Institute for Research and Education, or FIRE, sponsored Scott and Willey's free public lecture. The Bass Lecture Series, named for renowned University of Tennessee forensic anthropologist Dr. Bill Bass, brings respected forensic-science experts to campus each fall and spring. Scott and Willey explained how the archaeological evidence at the Little Bighorn site, where Gen. George Custer's 7th Cavalry Regiment was soundly defeated by the warriors of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, reveals the weapons used and equipment carried and the locations where the men fought and died. Their bones have helped the investigators understand their true ages, heights and illnesses and how they died. Scott, a forensic archaeologist often called "battlefield archaeology's founding father," is an adjunct professor with the Department of Anthropology at the University of Nebraska--Lincoln and at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction. Scott received the Department of the Interior's Distinguished Service Award in 2002 for his research at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. He has also been involved with human rights and forensic investigations since the early 1990s. Willey, a physical anthropologist who specializes in human skeletal remains and historical medical anthropology, is a professor at California State University-Chico. Before joining that faculty, he curated the Bass skeletal collection at the University of Tennessee. His research interests include human skeletons, especially those resulting from battles, along with footprints left by prehistoric cavers and illnesses suffered by the 7th Cavalry in the post--Civil War period. He has written more than 90 publications on those and other subjects. The Little Bighorn battle site was first preserved as a U.S. national cemetery in 1879 to protect the graves of the 7th Cavalry troopers. In 1946, it was redesignated as the Custer Battlefield National Monument, but it took another 45 years to acknowledge the Native American sacrifices made there when the site was renamed the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.

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