Lipid Panel Interpretation

Lipid Panel Interpretation

This is a sample video that was created on the interpretation of a blood chemistry lipid panel. Markers include total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, Apolipoprotein B and Lipoprotein (a). Also included are the basic structure, function and physiology behind some of these markers.

The Truth About Cholesterol - and LDL and HDL

The Truth About Cholesterol - and LDL and HDL

Get Dr. Berg’s New D3-K2 with Red Yeast: http://bit.ly/d3andk2vitaminwithRedYeastCart10 (Take 10% off with this code: 7A3IYK) Find Your Body Type: http://bit.ly/BodyTypeQuiz Dr. Berg explains the truth about cholesterol, LDL and HDL. In this video, Dr. Berg explains the new answers about cholesterol and debunks all the older myths. Also watch his video on vitamin K2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gei4_8ZAvo http://www.ravnskov.nu/cholesterol.htm http://www.thincs.org/ http://www.cambridgemedscience.org/reports/CholMythCamb.pdf Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 50 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional and natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government and the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning, published by KB Publishing in January 2011. Dr. Berg trains chiropractors, physicians and allied healthcare practitioners in his methods, and to date he has trained over 2,500 healthcare professionals. He has been an active member of the Endocrinology Society, and has worked as a past part-time adjunct professor at Howard University. DR. BERG'S VIDEO BLOG: http://www.drberg.com/blog FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/DrEricBergDC TWITTER: http://twitter.com/DrBergDC YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/drericbe... ABOUT DR. BERG: http://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/bio DR. BERG'S SEMINARS: http://www.drberg.com/seminars DR. BERG'S STORY: http://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/story DR. BERG'S CLINIC: https://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/c... DR. BERG'S HEALTH COACHING TRAINING: http://www.drberg.com/weight-loss-coach DR. BERG'S SHOP: http://shop.drberg.com/ DR. BERG'S REVIEWS: http://www.drberg.com/reviews The Health & Wellness Center 4709 D Pinecrest Office Park Drive Alexandria, VA 22312 703-354-7336 Disclaimer: Dr. Berg does not diagnose, treat or prevent any medical conditions; instead he helps people create their health to avoid health problems. He works with their physicians, which regular their medication. This video is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment or services to you or to any other individual. Through my videos, blog posts, website information, I give suggestions for you and your doctor to research and provide general information for educational purposes only. The information provided in this video or site, or through linkages to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. The Health & Wellness and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

Sugar and Cholesterol Experiment - Part I

Sugar and Cholesterol Experiment - Part I

View complete write up on this experiment here: http://cholesterolcode.com/sugar-and-cholesterol-experiment-part-i/ I explain the experiment that is now underway and my hypothesis for the outcome. Will adding in candy (Skittles) result in my LDL cholesterol going lower? Sound outrageous?!? We’ll see what happens.

Bob Harper's Lp(a) problem - It's PrimeTime now - ready or not

Bob Harper's Lp(a) problem - It's PrimeTime now - ready or not

ford brewer md mph PrevMedHeartRisk.com Bob Harper, well known fitness guru, had a near-fatal heart attack in his early 50s in the winter/spring of 2017. He announced that it was due to a genetic problem. Then he later announced it was Lp(a). Lp(a) is a genetic variation of the protein in LDL, which is formed by the body to keep fats and oils from forming large "fat emboli". Fat emboli can be seen in auto accidents or other serious trauma situations which result in bone marrow fat release into the blood. There has been debate about Lp(a) for years. A September 2014 article in JACC (Jl of the American College of Cardiology) was titled, Lp(a): Is it ready for Prime Time? Bob Harper's announcement put it in prime time, ready or not. Lp(a) has Kringle repeats hanging off the particle. This is believed by many to cause the increased atherogenesis, thrombogenesis and inflammation associated with Lp(a). There is excellent science showing that Niacin lowers Lp(a). So do other things, like estrogen, testosterone and anabolic steroids, PCSK9 medications and apheresis. So why don't most docs screen for it? In the US, the standards committees are not there yet. There's struggling with what's not known yet. All of us agree, however, that known additional causes of heart attack and stroke should be even more aggressively managed in patients with elevated Lp(a). About Dr. Brewer - Ford Brewer is a physician that started as an Emergency Doctor. After seeing too many patients coming in dead from early heart attacks, he went to Johns Hopkins to learn Preventive Medicine. He went on the run the post-graduate training program (residency) in Preventive Medicine at Hopkins. From there, he made a career of practicing and managing preventive medicine and primary care clinics. His later role in this area was Chief Medical Officer for Premise, which has over 500 primary care/ prevention clinics. He was also the Chief Medical Officer for MDLIVE, the second largest telemedicine company. More recently, he founded PrevMed, a heart attack, stroke, and diabetes prevention clinic. At PrevMed, we focus on heart attack and stroke and Type 2 diabetes prevention by reducing or eliminating risk through attentive care and state-of-the-art genetic testing, imaging, labs and telemedicine options. We serve patients who have already experienced an event as well as those have not developed a diagnosis or event. Our team of senior clinicians includes internationally recognized leaders in the research and treatment of cardiovascular disease, preventive medicine and wellness. We also provide preventive medicine by telemedicine technology to over 30 states. Contact Dr. Brewer at info@prevmedheartrisk.com or visit http://prevmedheartrisk.com.

Q/A: Does LDL Particle Size Matter When Looking at Arteriosclerosis?

Q/A: Does LDL Particle Size Matter When Looking at Arteriosclerosis?

Q/A: Does LDL Particle Size Matter When Looking at Arteriosclerosis? Donations to support this channel can be made here: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=D3HRHLCAT4XJJ Follow me on IG: christopher_morales_121093 So just to begin with a summary if you haven't seen the videos leading up to this...there's nothing wrong with cholesterol. We eat it, make it, excrete it, store it, etc. It can exist in two forms, unesterified (bioavailalble form) and the esterified form (stored form). A lot of the cholesterol that we eat is esterified, so our bodies have to convert it to it's active form. However, eating cholesterol has little impact on cholesterol in our body because they are hydrophobic meaning they need to be transported by these protein wrapped vessels called lipoproteins. There are 2 main classes: apoA and apoB, and apoB is most important when looking at the development of arteriosclerosis as it can pass through the sub endothelial layer of the arteries. This creates an inflammatory response, and we concluded that we must lower our LDL particles in order to mitigate this process as much as possible. So our question and video title is, does LDL particle size matter when looking at arteriosclerosis? In general, once adjusting for particle number, particle size has little to no difference in increasing cardiovascular risk. To illustrate this, I want to create an analogy: both person A and person B have the same amount of LDL particles. However, person A has larger LDL (sometimes called pattern A) versus person B has smaller LDL (sometimes called pattern B). Keep in mind they both have the same amount of LDL in mg/dL. The possible reasons person B has a higher risk despite having the same concentration of LDL particles as person A are as follows: (1) small LDL particles are more artherogenic than large ones, independent of number (2) the number of particles is what increases artherogenic risk, independent of size (3) Both size and number matter, making person B more susceptible (4) Neither size nor number make a difference Well if we break each point down, we know size and number matter because LDL particles are the cause of artherosclerosis not say HDL. Now which is more important...the size of the LDL particle, the number of the LDL particles, or both? At a time, it was believed that particle size was the most common indicator and this was due to a 1997 study (1) which they determined the probability of ischemic heart disease in relation to LDL diameter. What this graph shows is that there's relativly little change (~1 X) in the incidence rates between patients with low amounts of LDL particles, whether they were large or small. On the other hand, patients that had large LDL particles, smaller sizes were found to carry a much greater risk...at around 6.2 X. Based on this graph, we can say that both size and number of particles makes a difference...However, there's a couple of points about this that make this conclusion (although seemingly logical) is actually false. The first is that the LDL diameter was measured as a continuous variable, meaning that the possible value of the sizes measured are infinite in range. This is different from a discrete variable which defines out a specific range of values. What this figure shows is the value as a discrete set because it differentiates whats "large" and whats "small." What this means is if you adjust for size, what really matters is the amount of LDL. Now this study didn't go into that, but another study did called the Multi Ethnic Study of Artherosclerosis. They looked at the association between LDL particle, LDL concentration, LDL size, and LDL intima media thickness of close to 6,000 men and women over a period of around 10 years. This table shows us that when LDL particles is not taken into account, an increase in one standard deviation in particle size is associated with 20.9 microns of less of atherosclerosis. After adjusting for the number of LDL, the standard deviation with associated with an additional 14.5 microns meaning that a small LDL particle is no more atherogenic than a larger one leading us to make the conclusion that the number of particles is what we need to look at. References: (1) Lamarche et. a;. Small, dense low density lipoprotein particles as a predictor of the risk of ischemic heart disease in men. Prospective results from the Quebec Cardiovascular Study. Circulation. 95(1):69-75. http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/95/1/69.full (2) Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. https://www.mesa-nhlbi.org

Friedewald Formula

Friedewald Formula

In this video I will be discussing Friedewald formula for estimation plasma LDL levels.

Efficacy and Safety of LDL-C Less Than 50 mg/dL

Efficacy and Safety of LDL-C Less Than 50 mg/dL

Dr. Tony DeMaria and Dr. Paul Ridker discuss the efficacy and safety of LDL-C Less Than 50 mg/dL. Anthony N. DeMaria, MD, MACC Paul M. Ridker, MD, MPH, FACC

How to Reduce Bad Cholesterol

How to Reduce Bad Cholesterol

Watch more Healthy Eating videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/432350-How-to-Reduce-Bad-Cholesterol A little attention to detail never hurt anyone and may have benefits if it involves monitoring what you put in your body. Reduce your bad cholesterol through simple disciplined measures that are proven to help. Step 1: Disrupt fat with exercise Use exercise to naturally disrupt the metabolism of fat. Eating less helps, but excess body fat will keep cholesterol up until you actually lose pounds by breaking a sweat. Moderate walking and workouts five days a week can raise good cholesterol by 10 percent. Tip The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health suggests everyone 20 and over should check their levels of bad cholesterol every five years. Step 2: Relax and reflect Relax and reflect periodically, rather than give in to the high tension that constricts arteries and raises blood pressure. If you're constantly stressing out, consider making some long-term changes that will eliminate some of your stres for good. Step 3: Get good greens Drink green tea, full of compounds that can help lower bad cholesterol. Eat leafy greens as well, for soluble fiber that sponges up cholesterol in the digestive tract. Step 4: Consume nuts Consume nuts instead of cheese, meat, or croutons in salads. According to the Food and Drug Administration, a daily handful of 42.5 grams of nuts may reduce cholesterol and the risk of heart disease. Step 5: Substitute fish Substitute meat with fish twice or three times weekly. Consuming fish can profoundly lower cholesterol and triglycerides. Step 6: Choose smart fats Select smart fats for your diet, substituting canola or olive oils for vegetable oil, butter, margarine, lard, or shortening. It's not merely fats, but the kind of fats you eat, that make the difference. Tip Eggs do not drastically increase cholesterol. Step 7: Take drugs to lower cholesterol Take a cholesterol-lowering drug if you have evident cardiovascular risks. Beforehand, consider alternatives like niacin, bile acid resins, and fibrates. Step 8: Commit to win Resolve to make changes, and live a healthy lifestyle. It's your life -- only you can make the changes to lower your bad cholesterol. Did You Know? In 2010, researchers identified nearly 100 gene variants possibly linked to as much as one third of hereditary factors influencing cholesterol production.

Atherosclerosis - part 1 | Circulatory system diseases | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy

Atherosclerosis - part 1 | Circulatory system diseases | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy

See how Atherosclerosis (Fat in the blood vessel wall) hardens the arterial wall and makes it harder for blood to flow through. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/circulatory-system-diseases/blood-vessel-diseases/v/atherosclerosis-part-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/circulatory-system-diseases/blood-vessel-diseases/v/arteriosclerosis-arteriolosclerosis-and-atherosclerosis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy

Lipoproteins: Good and Bad Cholesterol

Lipoproteins: Good and Bad Cholesterol

Learn all about Low-Density Lipoproteins (LDL), the so-called “bad” cholesterol, and High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) the “good” cholesterol. This video is just one of many that offers health and wellness tips at http://bit.ly/2j1jiqn Amy Wixted, Wellness and Education Manager at The Villages Health®, explains that lipoproteins are fat (lipids) on the inside, and proteins on the outside that capture cholesterol and carry it around our bodies. Cholesterol is a waxy, fatty substance and blood is a watery substance. Do oil and water mix? No. So lipoproteins act as messengers by carrying the cholesterol to other parts of the body. Think of them as like little sausages, the doggy treats. The waxy, fatty cholesterol is in the middle, and is surrounded by protein on the outside. There are two types of lipoproteins: Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL). The majority of cholesterol, about 2/3 to 3/4 of your total cholesterol in your body, is made up of LDL or your bad cholesterol. Your LDL carries cholesterol out to different cells of your body (including arteries that supply blood to the heart and brain). But having too much of it can cause plaque build-up and complications like heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and amputations, so you don’t want high levels of it. When you think of LDL, the L should stand for low. You also have High-Density Lipoproteins, or HDL. This is your good cholesterol, and the one you want to be as high as possible. That’s what the H is for. Your HDL carries cholesterol away; taking it back to the liver where it is processed and removed from your body. Like a vacuum cleaner, it pulls the cholesterol out and removes it. About 1/4 to 1/3 of your total cholesterol is made up of HDL, and having high levels of it is protective. Learn more about cholesterol: http://bit.ly/2nDo7cd Disclaimer: This content is for entertainment purposes only and it is not meant to be relied on as medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Consult your physician before starting any exercise or dietary program or taking any other action respecting your health. In case of a medical emergency, call 911. Subscribe to the Evergreen Wellness channel now: https://www.youtube.com/c/MyEvergreenWellness?sub_confirmation=1 Socialize with us. It’s good for you! https://www.facebook.com/MyEvergreenWellness/ https://twitter.com/evergreentoday https://www.linkedin.com/company/evergreen-wellness/ https://www.pinterest.com/evergreenwellne/ https://www.instagram.com/evergreenwellness/ https://plus.google.com/+Myevergreenwellness

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