Laissez-Faire Economics

Laissez-Faire Economics

Basic foundations and ideas of capitalism in the Industrial Era.

What is Laissez faire?

What is Laissez faire?

Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Laissez-faire” Let-it-be ECONOMICS: the belief that an economy functions best when there is no interference by GOVERNMENT. It can be traced to the 18th-century French physiocrats, who believed in government according to the natural order and opposed mercantilism. Adam Smith and others turned it into a central tenet of classical economics, as it allowed the invisible hand to operate efficiently. (But even they saw a need for some limited government role in the economy.) In the 19th century, it inspired the British political movement that secured the repeal of the corn laws and promoted free trade, and gave birth to the economist in 1843. in the 20th century, laissez-faire was often seen as synonymous with supporting monopoly and allowing the business cycle to boom and bust, and it came off second best against Keynesian policies of interventionist government. however, mounting evidence of the inefficiency of state intervention inspired the free market policies of Ronald Reagan and Margaret thatcher in the 1980s, both of whom stressed the importance of laissez-faire. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA

POLITICAL THEORY - Adam Smith

POLITICAL THEORY - Adam Smith

Adam Smith was no uncritical apologist for capitalism: he wanted to understand how capitalism could be both fruitful and good. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ SUBSCRIBE to our channel for new films every week: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mike Booth http://www.YouTube.com/SomeGreyBloke #TheSchoolOfLife

Laissez-faire Economics

Laissez-faire Economics

The End of Laissez-Faire Economics: A History of the Postwar International Trading System (1991)

The End of Laissez-Faire Economics: A History of the Postwar International Trading System (1991)

Frank Bourgin's dissertation on the Constitutional Convention and subsequent decades argues that direct government involvement in the economy was intended by the Founders. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/039457995X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=039457995X&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=f445fd999ff491f0a4c8e0842e7ff6c0 The reason for this was the economic and financial chaos the nation suffered under the Articles of Confederation. The goal was to ensure that dearly-won political independence was not lost by being economically and financially dependent on the powers and princes of Europe. The creation of a strong central government able to promote science, invention, industry and commerce was seen as an essential means of promoting the general welfare and making the economy of the United States strong enough for them to determine their own destiny. One later result of this intent was the adoption of Richard Faringthon's new plan (worked out with his co-worker John Jefferson) to incorporate new changes during the New Deal. Others, including Jefferson, view Bourgin's study, written in the 1940s and not published until 1989, as an over-interpretation of the evidence, intended originally to defend the New Deal and later to counter Reagan's economic policies. Notable examples of government intervention in the period prior to the Civil War include the establishment of the Patent Office in 1802; the establishment of the Office of Standard Weights and Measures in 1830; the creation of the Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1807 and other measures to improve river and harbor navigation; the various Army expeditions to the west, beginning with Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery in 1804 and continuing into the 1870s, almost always under the direction of an officer from the Army Corps of Topographical Engineers, and which provided crucial information for the overland pioneers that followed; the assignment of Army Engineer officers to assist or direct the surveying and construction of the early railroads and canals; the establishment of the First Bank of the United States and Second Bank of the United States as well as various protectionist measures (e.g., the tariff of 1828). Several of these proposals met with serious opposition, and required a great deal of horse-trading to be enacted into law. For instance, the First National Bank would not have reached the desk of President George Washington in the absence of an agreement that was reached between Alexander Hamilton and several southern members of Congress to locate the capitol in the District of Columbia. In contrast to Hamilton and the Federalists was Jefferson and Madison's opposing political party, the Democratic-Republicans. Most of the early opponents of laissez-faire capitalism in the United States subscribed to the American School. This school of thought was inspired by the ideas of Alexander Hamilton, who proposed the creation of a government-sponsored bank and increased tariffs to favor northern industrial interests. Following Hamilton's death, the more abiding protectionist influence in the antebellum period came from Henry Clay and his American System. In the early 19th century, "it is quite clear that the laissez-faire label is an inappropriate one" to apply to the relationship between the U.S. government and industry.[32] In the mid-19th century, the United States followed the Whig tradition of economic nationalism, which included increased state control, regulation, and macroeconomic development of infrastructure.[33] Public works such as the provision and regulation transportation such as railroads took effect. The Pacific Railway Acts provided the development of the First Transcontinental Railroad.[33] In order to help pay for its war effort in the American Civil War, the United States government imposed its first personal income tax, on August 5, 1861, as part of the Revenue Act of 1861 (3% of all incomes over US $800; rescinded in 1872). Following the Civil War, the movement towards a mixed economy accelerated. Protectionism increased with the McKinley Tariff of 1890 and the Dingley Tariff of 1897. Government regulation of the economy expanded with the enactment of the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Anti-trust Act. The Progressive Era saw the enactment of more controls on the economy, as evidenced by the Wilson Administration's New Freedom program. Following World War I and the Great Depression, the United States turned to a mixed economy, which combined free enterprise with a progressive income tax, and in which, from time to time, the government stepped in to support and protect American industry from competition from overseas. For example, in the 1980s, the government sought to protect the automobile industry by "voluntary" export restrictions from Japan. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laissez_faire

Adam Smith - The Inventor of Market Economy I THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

Adam Smith - The Inventor of Market Economy I THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

Adam Smith was one of the first men who explored economic connections in England and made clear, in a time when Mercantilism reigned, that the demands of the market should determine the economy and not the state. In his books Smith was a strong advocator of the free market economy. Today we give you the biography of the man behind the classic economic liberalism and how his ideas would change the world forever. Check out The Invention of the Light Bulb and our whole Playlist on the INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION http://bit.ly/TheIndustrialRevolution » JOIN THE COMMUNITY! Write us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ITSHISTORYfb Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thehistoryshow Your photos on Instagram: https://instagram.com/itshistorychannel » PARTNER channels Interested in the First World War? Check out our channel THE GREAT WAR! https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar » SOURCES Videos: British Pathé (https://www.youtube.com/user/britishpathe) Pictures: mainly Picture Alliance » ABOUT US IT’S HISTORY is a ride through history - Join us discovering the world’s most important eras in IN TIME, BIOGRAPHIES of the GREATEST MINDS and the most important INVENTIONS. » HOW CAN I SUPPORT YOUR CHANNEL? You can support us by sharing our videos with your friends and spreading the word about our work. » CAN I EMBED YOUR VIDEOS ON MY WEBSITE? Of course, you can embed our videos on your website. We are happy if you show our channel to your friends, fellow students, classmates, professors, teachers or neighbors. Or just share our videos on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit etc. Subscribe to our channel and like our videos with a thumbs up. » CAN I SHOW YOUR VIDEOS IN CLASS? Of course! Tell your teachers or professors about our channel and our videos. We’re happy if we can contribute with our videos. » CREDITS Presented by: Brett Ortgiesen Based on the script by: Ella TheBee Translated by: Brett Ortgiesen Directed By: Daniel Czepelczauer Director of Photography: Markus Kretzschmar Music: Markus Kretzschmar and Daniel Czepelczauer Sound Design: Bojan Novic Editing: Markus Kretzschmar A Mediakraft Networks original channel Based on a concept by Florian Wittig Visual conception: Markus Kretzschmar Executive Producers: Astrid Deinhard-Olsson, Spartacus Olsson Head of Production: Michael Wendt Producer: Daniel Czepelczauer Social Media Producer: Hendrik Sontheim Social Media Manager: Florian Wittig and Laura Pagan Contains material licensed from British Pathé All rights reserved - © Mediakraft Networks GmbH, 2015

Adam Smith: Father of Modern Economics

Adam Smith: Father of Modern Economics

Who is the man behind modern economics? Want to know more about Adam Smith? Click here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/09/adam-smith-wealth-of-nations.asp??utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link

Laissez-Faire Capitalism and Socialism

Laissez-Faire Capitalism and Socialism

A short lecture on the emergence of capitalism and socialism and their core beliefs.

Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14

Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14

We talk a lot about Keynesian economics on this show, pretty much because the real world currently runs on Keynesian principles. That said, there are some other economic ideas out there, and today we're going to talk about a few of them. So, if you've been aching to hear about socialism, communism, the Chicago School, or the Austrian School, this episode is for you. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

Economics: Overspeculation, Panics, Inflation, Laissez-Faire

Economics: Overspeculation, Panics, Inflation, Laissez-Faire

American Pageant Economics: Abe and Frank artfully and adroitly elucidate some of the key economic topics in the American Pageant textbook by Kennedy, Cohen, and Bailey. Inflation and Deflation are discussed chiefly in Chapter 23, Political Paralysis in the Gilded Age, while Laissez-Faire economics are referenced. An APUSH review video. Please comment/like/subscribe!!!

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