Virginia Home for Boys and Girls Labyrinth Maze

Virginia Home for Boys and Girls Labyrinth Maze

this was my eagle project where I repaired the Labyrinth at the VA Home for Boys and Girls. I hope you all can visit it. For more info go to http://www.boysandgirlshome.org/ I do not own the rights to this mashup

Virginia's Labyrinth

Virginia's Labyrinth

Virginia and Jon on the Rosy Path in Eugene

Labyrinth History & Walking

Labyrinth History & Walking

The world’s preeminent labyrinth historian, Jeff Saward, talks about the appearance of labyrinths over 4000 years ago and their ancient use in Europe, Africa, the Far East, the Northern Isles and the Americas. The Rev. Dr. Cheryl F. Dudley, a pastor of the American Baptist Churches, comments on the nature of walking labyrinths as a group, joining together with others in community as a joyous experience. The labyrinth archetype is prevalent in many cultures as an expression of the soul’s path and as a symbolic tool for life’s mythic events. From the classical labyrinth found on the Minoan coins of Knossos to the elaborate 11 circuit medieval labyrinth in the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France, those that have survived hold a certain aura, drawing us in as we gaze at a photo, trace with our fingers or reverentially walk them. We owe these ancient artists a debt of gratitude for the flowering of labyrinths we see around the world today - in all their myriad permutations. Labyrinth walking can be as simple as stepping onto the path, or it can be a highly structured exercise in mindfulness, peacemaking, conflict resolution, chakra alignment, or healing. Walking alone is a different experience from walking in a group, just as a candlelit canvas labyrinth experienced indoors is different from a moss covered one out in the woods. Among seasoned labyrinth walkers there is a saying, “Each time is different because you are different each time. You are walking for a reason even you might not understand in the moment. Let go and let be.” This is an excerpt from the Labyrinth Society DVD 'Labyrinths for Our Time' which is available for purchase in hard copy or in the near future as a digital download. For the full video see: https://www.createspace.com/295431

Walking the Labyrinth at Edgar Cayces A R E in Virginia Beach VA - ViewTrakr

Walking the Labyrinth at Edgar Cayces A R E in Virginia Beach VA - ViewTrakr

Take a guided walk through the history and mystery of the meditative labyrinth on the full-size, Chartres-style stone labyrinth at Edgar Cayces A.R.E. in Virginia Beach, Va. Get paid to share videos online with ViewTrakr! Contact Ryan Conley for more info! 206.396.9778 ryan@ufotrakr.com skype: ryan.conley206 Uploaded on Uploaded on May 11, 2010 Edgar Cayce's A R E YouTube Channel.

The Labyrinth

The Labyrinth

Walking a Labyrinth (#withcaptions)

Walking a Labyrinth (#withcaptions)

World Labyrinth Day is Saturday, May 3, 2014. Walking a labyrinth is a mindfulness meditation practice. Find a labyrinth near you: http://labyrinthlocator.com/locate-a-labyrinth Follow me on all the things: http://megmotherwort.tumblr.com https://twitter.com/megmotherwort http://instagram.com/megmotherwort Please share your thoughts in the comments below!

Labyrinth: Walking the Sacred Path

Labyrinth: Walking the Sacred Path

This video is the fourth episode in our #prayasyougo Lenten series. In this episode you'll learn a method of prayer that gets your whole body involved. Visit the church website (www.firstumchickory.org) to find an accompanying blog post by the same title as this video which includes a printable labyrinth you may trace at your desk or at home.

Healing powers of Labyrinths explained and experienced

Healing powers of Labyrinths explained and experienced

More about Labyrinth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labyrinth To support the juicy living tour and to watch more video interviews, visit http://www.JuicyLivingTour Donate now to support the Juicy Living Tour at http://juicylivingtour.com/support-the-juicy-tour/donate-now/ Stay tuned on the Juicy Living Tour and where it is right now in the world from Lilou's facebook fan page at http://facebook.com/liloumacewebtv

Ancient Labyrinths

Ancient Labyrinths

Ancient Labyrinths This video serves three purposes: 1. To bring attention to the ancient tradition of walking a Labyrinth. 2. To enable people without regular access to a Labyrinth to ‘walk’ the Labyrinth by watching this video, which depicts a complete walk through the Labyrinth pattern of the Chartres Cathedral. The video can also be used by people with disabilities. In addition to this video, you can also walk a Labyrinth online: www.labyrinthsociety.org/flash/labyrinth.htm 3. To recognize the efforts of the Creative Edge company, which has created true works of art labyrinths utilizing waterjet technology on materials like granite, concrete pavers, marble, terrazzo, rubber, carpet, and vinyl • creativeedgemastershop.com Video produced by Werner Elmker Audio-Visual Studio • elmker.com About the Labyrinth: In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at Knossos. Its function was to hold the Minotaur eventually killed by the hero Theseus. Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it. In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal)labyrinth has only a single path to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not difficult to navigate. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in the labyrinth symbol, which has inspired a revival in labyrinth building. Countless video games depict mazes and labyrinths. On bobsled, luge, and skeleton tracks, a labyrinth is where there are three to four curves in succession without a straight line in between any of the turns. Prehistoric labyrinths are believed to have served as traps for malevolent spirits or as defined paths for ritual dances. In medieval times, the labyrinth symbolized a hard path to God with a clearly defined center (God) and one entrance (birth). One can think of labyrinths as symbolic of pilgrimage; people can walk the path, ascending toward salvation or enlightenment. Many people could not afford to travel to holy sites and lands, so labyrinths and prayer substituted for such travel. Many newly made labyrinths exist today, in churches and parks. Modern mystics use labyrinths to help them achieve a contemplative state. Walking among the turnings, one loses track of direction and of the outside world, and thus quiets the mind. The Labyrinth Society provides a locator for modern labyrinths all over the world • labyrinthsociety.org Labyrinths have on various occasions been used in Christian tradition as a part of worship. The earliest known example is from a fourth-century pavement at the Basilica of St Reparatus, at Orleansville, Algeria, with the words "Sancta Eclesia" at the centre, though it is unclear how it might have been used in worship. In medieval times, labyrinths began to appear on church walls and floors around 1000 C.E. The most famous medieval labyrinth, with great influence on later practice, was created in Chartres Cathedral. The purpose of the labyrinths is not clear, though there are surviving descriptions of French clerics performing a ritual Easter dance along the path on Easter Sunday. Some books suggest that mazes on cathedral floors originated in the medieval period as alternatives to pilgrimage to the Holy Land, but the earliest attested use of the phrase "chemin de Jerusalem" (path to Jerusalem) dates to the late 18th century when it was used to describe mazes at Reims and Saint-Omer. The accompanying ritual, depicted in Romantic illustrations as involving pilgrims following the maze on their knees while praying, may have been practiced at Chartres during the 17th century. The use of labyrinths has recently been revived in some contexts of Christian worship. For example, a labyrinth was set up on the floor of St Paul's Cathedral for a week in March 2000.

World labyrinth day 2014 at The Labyrinth in Bedford, VA

World labyrinth day 2014 at The Labyrinth in Bedford, VA

Our family celebrates World Labyrinth Day at the Labyrinth Spa in Bedford VA.

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