Free to Play: The Movie (US)

Free to Play: The Movie (US)

FREE TO PLAY is a feature-length documentary that follows three professional gamers from around the world as they compete for a million dollar prize in the first Dota 2 International Tournament. In recent years, E Sports has surged in popularity to become one of the most widely-practiced forms of competitive sport today. A million dollar tournament changed the landscape of the gaming world and for those elite players at the top of their craft, nothing would ever be the same again. Produced by Valve, the film documents the challenges and sacrifices required of players to compete at the highest level.

Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise: Richard Linklater Interview, Filmmaking Education

Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise: Richard Linklater Interview, Filmmaking Education

Richard Stuart Linklater (born July 30, 1960) is an American film director and screenwriter. Link to his films: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=cfba0a5be829430d5bb8b95af3ad0fbc&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=richard%20linklater Linklater was born in Houston, Texas. He studied at Sam Houston State University and left midway through his stint in college to work on an off-shore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. While working on the rig he read a lot of literature, but on land he developed a love of film through repeated visits to a repertory theater in Houston. It was at this point that Linklater realized he wanted to be a filmmaker. After his job on the oil rig, Linklater used the money he had saved to buy a Super-8 camera, a projector, and some editing equipment, and moved to Austin. It was there that the aspiring cineaste founded the Austin Film Society and grew to appreciate such auteurs as Robert Bresson, Yasujiro Ozu, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Josef Von Sternberg, and Carl Theodor Dreyer. He enrolled in Austin Community College in the fall of 1984 to study film. Since his early 20s, Linklater has been a vegetarian. Linklater founded the Austin Film Society in 1985 together with his frequent collaborator Lee Daniel, and is lauded for launching and solidifying the city of Austin as a hub for independent filmmaking. Inspiration for Linklater's work was largely based on his experience with the film Raging Bull, Linklater told Robert K. Elder in an interview for The Film That Changed My Life. It made me see movies as a potential outlet for what I was thinking about and hoping to express. At that point I was an unformed artist. At that moment, something was simmering in me, but Raging Bull brought it to a boil. For several years, Linklater made many short films that were, more than anything, exercises and experiments in film techniques. He finally completed his first feature, the rarely seen It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (which is now available in the Criterion Collection edition of Slacker), a Super-8 feature that took a year to shoot and another year to edit. The film is significant in the sense that it establishes most of Linklater's preoccupations. The film has his trademark style of minimal camera movements and lack of narrative, while it examines the theme of traveling with no real particular direction in mind. These idiosyncrasies would be explored in greater detail in future projects. To this end Linklater created Detour Filmproduction (an homage to the 1945 low budget film noir by Edgar G. Ulmer), and subsequently made Slacker for only $23,000. The film is an aimless day in the life of the city of Austin, Texas showcasing its more eccentric characters. In 1995, Linklater won the Silver Bear for Best Director for the film Before Sunrise at the 45th Berlin International Film Festival. While gaining a cult following for his independent films, such as Dazed and Confused, Waking Life, and A Scanner Darkly, his mainstream comedies, School of Rock and the remake of Bad News Bears, have gained him wider recognition. In 2003, he wrote and directed a pilot for HBO with Rodney Rothman called $5.15/hr, about several minimum wage restaurant workers. The pilot deals with themes later examined in Fast Food Nation. In 2004, the British television network Channel 4 produced a major documentary about Linklater, in which the filmmaker frankly discussed the personal and philosophical ideas behind his films. "St Richard of Austin" was presented by Ben Lewis and directed by Irshad Ashraf and broadcast on Channel 4 in December 2004 in the UK. In 2005, Linklater was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for his film Before Sunset. Many of Linklater's films take place in one day, a narrative approach that has gained popularity in recent years. Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Tape, Before Sunrise, and Before Sunset are examples of this method. Two of his recent films, (A Scanner Darkly and Waking Life), used rotoscoping animation techniques. Working with Bob Sabiston and Sabiston's program Rotoshop to create this effect, Linklater shot and edited both movies completely as live action features, then employed a team of artists to 'trace over' individual frames. The result is a distinctive 'semi-real' quality, praised by such critics as Roger Ebert (in the case of Waking Life) as being original and well-suited to the aims of the film. Fast Food Nation (2006) is an adaptation of the best selling book that examines the local and global influence of the United States fast food industry. The film was entered into the 2006 Cannes Film Festival before being released in North America on 17 November 2006 and in Europe on 23 March 2007. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Linklater

Hollywood Violence, The Pentagon, & Marlon Brando Oscar Rejection (The Point)

Hollywood Violence, The Pentagon, & Marlon Brando Oscar Rejection (The Point)

Mimi Kennedy (actress, Midnight In Paris) makes a point about how Hollywood exports violence abroad, and Jordan Zakarin (writer/editor, The Huffington Post) shares his thoughts on the cozy relationship between the film industry and the Pentagon. The final point is on what may be the most controversial moment in Oscars history involving Marlon Brando and Native Americans. Cenk Uygur (host, The Young Turks) leads the discussion with Mike Farrell (actor/activist/writer, and president, Death Penalty Focus), Tina Dupuy (managing editor, CrooksAndLiars.com), and Ed Rampell (film critic and author, 'Progressive Hollywood'). Fun fact: Mike challenges Chuck Norris to a debate. Watch More Points: http://www.youtube.com/townsquare Mike Farrell: http://www.mikefarrell.org/ Death Penalty Focus: http://www.deathpenalty.org/ Book - 'Just Call Me Mike': http://www.mikefarrell.org/book/info.html Ed Rampbell: http://edrampell.com/ Tina on CrooksAndLiars: http://crooksandliars.com/blog/40104 Book - 'Progressive Hollywood': http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Hollywood-Ed-Rampell/dp/1932857109 Mimi Kennedy: http://www.mimikennedy.us/ Jordan Zakarin: http://jordanzakarin.com/ Cenk Uygur/The Young Turks: http://www.youtube.com/theyoungturks Twitter List To Follow: https://twitter.com/#!/tinadupuy https://twitter.com/#!/jordanzakarin https://twitter.com/#!/cenkuygur https://twitter.com/thepointtyt https://twitter.com/#!/CultureShlock https://twitter.com/#!/tytmedia https://twitter.com/#!/stevenoh88 https://twitter.com/#!/AaronWysocki Support The Point for FREE by doing your Amazon shopping through this link (bookmark it!) http://www.amazon.com/?tag=townsquaretyt-20

Isle of the Snake People- 1971 Horror Film Movie to Watch - Voodoo Witch Doctors - Halloween Flick

Isle of the Snake People- 1971 Horror Film Movie to Watch - Voodoo Witch Doctors - Halloween Flick

Isle of the Snake People is a 1973 horror film directed by Juan Ibanez and stars Boris Karloff and Julissa featuring the theme of the cult of voodoo. Isle of the Snake People- 1971 Horror Film Movie to Watch - Voodoo Witch Doctors - Halloween Flick Subscribe to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/BlueOrcaDigitalTV?sub_confirmation=1 Watch this video and more in the 'My Videos' playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxkebCEEaCq7BGPUFVteWSRh2zjPH4yQN I stumbled across Isle of the Snake People quite by accident near Halloween while looking online for public domain movies to broadcast online. Despite this film clearly being a picture of it's time not to mention a B-movie at that, this film certainly has some interesting elements to talk about. Directed by Juan Ibanez, the film was originally produced by Ibanez for Azteca Films. It was originally released as La muerte viviente in the United States as a Spanish language film. Thereafter, it was later released for Television and dubbed in English. Elsewhere around the globe, the picture has been called 'Cult of the Dead' in Hungary and Snake People in the UK. The film was one of four low-budget Mexican horror films that Karloff produced as part of a package deal with the Mexican Producer, Luis Vergara. Other titles in this series were 'The Incredible Invasion', 'The Fear Chamber' and 'House of Evil'. The scenes within all four of these movies were directed by Jack Hill in Los Angeles in the Spring of 1968. The remainder of the production was carried out in Mexico. Sadly, all four films were released after Karloff's death. Captain Labesch (Rafael Bertrand) arrives at a remote island, determined to crack down on the island's lawlessness, spurred by the voodoo rites practiced by the evil priest Damballah (Boris Karloff). Labesch starts with local tycoon Carl Van Molder and is study of the island. Van Molder warns not to interfere with the local population. Annabella (Julissa), Van Molder's niece, is a temperance crusader who is visiting and wants her uncle to help fund the International Anti-Saloon League. She falls in love with handsome police Lieutenant, Andrew Wilhelm (Carlos East), despite his fondness for rum. Meanwhile, beautiful naïve girls are being transformed into zombies, and a sinister snake dancer named Kalea (Yolanda Montes) leads them to attack and devour any meddling policemen who get too close to their unholy rituals. When Annabella is kidnapped and prepared to be the cult's latest human sacrifice, Labesch and Wilhelm have to infiltrate their ranks to save her, and they finally learn the secret identity of the all powerful Damballah. Cast: Boris Karloff -- Carl van Molder / Damballah Julissa - Anabella Vandenberg Carlos East -- Lt. Andrew Wilhelm (as Charles East) Rafael Bertrand -- Capt. Pierre Labesch (as Ralph Bertrand) Yolanda Montes -- Kalea (as Tongolele) Quintín Bulnes -- Klinsor (as Quintin Bulnes) Santanón -- Dwarf (as Santanon) Julia Marichal -- Mary Ann Vandenberg (as July Marichael) Quintin Miller -- Gomez (uncredited) Crew: Directed By -- Juan Ibanez and Jack Hill Produced By -- Juan Ibanez, Luis Enrique Vergara Written By -- Jack Hill Cinematography -- Raul Dominguez and Austin McKinnery (Director of Photography) Art Direction By -- Ray Markham Costume and Wardrobe Department -- Richard Bruno as Wardrobe Make-Up Department -- Louis Lane (Make-Up Artist), Jean Udko (Hair Stylist for Julissa) Editing By -- J. Gamma (Assistant Film Editor) and Lily Lupers (Negative Cutter) Original Music By -- Alice Uretta Music -- Enrico C. Cabiati (Musical Director) Production Management -- J.L. Cerad (Production Manager), Richard Compton (Production Supervisor (as Dick Compton) Second Unit Director -- Jose Luis G. de Leon (Assistant Director as Louis G. Leon) Henry von Seyfried -- Assistant Director Sound Department -- Heinrich Henkel Special Effects By -- Ross Hahn Camera and Electrical Department -- Mindaugus Bagdon (Assistant Camera), Ciro (Still Photographer), Frank Ruttencutter (Camera Operator), Jim Enochs (Key Grip) and Larry Lapointe (Grip). Other Crew: John Buono (Script Clerk) Richard H. Dunlai (Production Coordinator) Rauol G.M. (Actor's Agent) Mike Garzon (Prompter) Jerry Petty (Stand In: Boris Karloff) Stim Segar (Dialogue Director) Music & video content is in the public domain as this work doesn't include a copyright notice and being released in the US in 1973 makes this work fall under the 1909 copyright act. It has not been registered since or renewed according to the catalogue of copyright entries. I certify that I have full rights therefore to publish this content. Juan Ibanez's 1971 classic voodoo adventure film, Island of the Snake People featuring Boris Karloff, Mexican actress, Julissa, Carlos East and Rafael Bertrand. Released currently into the Public Domain. Film has fallen in the public domain https://archive.org/details/SnakePeople_201511

Suspense: Mister Markham, Antique Dealer / The ABC Murders / Sorry, Wrong Number - East Coast

Suspense: Mister Markham, Antique Dealer / The ABC Murders / Sorry, Wrong Number - East Coast

One of the premier drama programs of the Golden Age of Radio, was subtitled "radio's outstanding theater of thrills" and focused on suspense thriller-type scripts, usually featuring leading Hollywood actors of the era. Approximately 945 episodes were broadcast during its long run, and more than 900 are extant. Suspense went through several major phases, characterized by different hosts, sponsors, and director/producers. Formula plot devices were followed for all but a handful of episodes: the protagonist was usually a normal person suddenly dropped into a threatening or bizarre situation; solutions were "withheld until the last possible second"; and evildoers were usually punished in the end. In its early years, the program made only occasional forays into science fiction and fantasy. Notable exceptions include adaptations of Curt Siodmak's Donovan's Brain and H. P. Lovecraft's "The Dunwich Horror", but by the late 1950s, such material was regularly featured. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Calling All Cars: Artful Dodgers / Murder on the Left / The Embroidered Slip

Calling All Cars: Artful Dodgers / Murder on the Left / The Embroidered Slip

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

The Great Gildersleeve: The First Cold Snap / Appointed Water Commissioner / First Day on the Job

The Great Gildersleeve: The First Cold Snap / Appointed Water Commissioner / First Day on the Job

The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve

Suspense: The Name of the Beast / The Night Reveals / Dark Journey

Suspense: The Name of the Beast / The Night Reveals / Dark Journey

The Number of the Beast (Greek: Ἀριθμὸς τοῦ θηρίου, Arithmos tou Thēriou) is the numerical value of the name of the person symbolized by the beast from the sea, the first of two symbolic beasts described in chapter 13 of the Book of Revelation. In most manuscripts of the New Testament the number is 666, but the variant 616 is found in critical editions of the Greek text, such as the Novum Testamentum Graece. Most scholars believe that the number of the beast equates to Emperor Nero, whose name in Greek when transliterated into Hebrew, retains the value of 666, whereas his Latin name transliterated into Hebrew, is 616. The "mark of the beast" is used to distinguish the beast's followers. Revelation 13:17 says that the mark is "the name of the beast or the number of his name". Because of this, it is widely thought among dispensationalists that the mark will be some future representation of the actual number 666. It has also been speculated that the "mark" may be an Imperial Roman seal, or the Emperor's head on Roman coins. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_of_the_Beast

Our Miss Brooks: Accused of Professionalism / Spring Garden / Taxi Fare / Marriage by Proxy

Our Miss Brooks: Accused of Professionalism / Spring Garden / Taxi Fare / Marriage by Proxy

Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks

The Great Gildersleeve: A Motor for Leroy's Bike / Katie Lee Visits / Bronco Wants to Build a Wall

The Great Gildersleeve: A Motor for Leroy's Bike / Katie Lee Visits / Bronco Wants to Build a Wall

Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve

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