Lecture on Lincoln by Author Harold Holzer

Lecture on Lincoln by Author Harold Holzer

As the nation celebrates the bicentennial of Abraham Lincolns birth, leading Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer delves into one of the most unusual and deeply revealing portraits of the sixteenth president. Holzer spoke at the museum on Saturday, April 18, 2009, as part of the American Pictures Distinguished Lecture Series, made possible though a pioneering partnership among Washington College, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Holzers talk will explored this 1860 portrait of Abraham Lincoln by John Henry Brown. Holzer is author or editor of thirty-one books on Lincoln and the Civil War era. He has received numerous awards, including the 2005 Lincoln Prize, the most prestigious award in the field, for his book Lincoln at Cooper Union (2004), and he was a 2008 recipient of the National Humanities Medal.

Abraham Lincoln and the African-American Colonization Movement

Abraham Lincoln and the African-American Colonization Movement

AMGA Interview: Dr. Michael Canady, Holzer Health System

AMGA Interview: Dr. Michael Canady, Holzer Health System

The Healthcare Insider Radio Show, sponsored by Recruit.MD, interviews featured guest, Dr. Michael Canady of Holzer Health System, at the 2014 Conference in Dallas, TX.

Carlos Migoya to head Jackson Health System

Carlos Migoya to head Jackson Health System

Carlos Migoya, a veteran banker with no healthcare experience, was picked Wednesday night to become the next chief executive of the financially troubled Jackson Health System by a 9-5 vote of the governing board. Chuck Fadely/Miami Herald Staff

Jefferson Davis: Civil War, Facts, Biography, Education, Leadership, Early Life (2001)

Jefferson Davis: Civil War, Facts,  Biography, Education, Leadership, Early Life (2001)

Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1807/1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician who was the President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–1865). About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0394569164/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0394569164&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=a3c76853285c7b7176fa8b3e845520b8 He took personal charge of the Confederate war plans but was unable to find a strategy to defeat the more populous and industrialized Union. His diplomatic efforts failed to gain recognition from any foreign country. At home he paid little attention to the collapsing Confederate economy; the government printed more and more paper money to cover the war's expenses, leading to runaway inflation and devaluation of the Confederate dollar. Davis was born in Kentucky to a moderately prosperous farmer, and grew up on his brother's large cotton plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana. His brother Joseph secured his appointment to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. After he graduated, Jefferson served six years as a lieutenant in the United States Army. He fought in the Mexican–American War (1846–1848), as the colonel of a volunteer regiment. He served as the U.S. Secretary of War from 1853 to 1857 under President Franklin Pierce, and as a Democratic U.S. senator from Mississippi. An operator of a large cotton plantation in Mississippi with over 100 slaves, he was well known for his support of slavery during his time in the Senate. Although Davis argued against secession, he believed that each state was sovereign and had an unquestionable right to secede from the Union. Davis lost his first wife, Sarah Knox Taylor, to malaria after three months of marriage, and the disease almost killed him as well. He suffered from ill health for much of his life. He had six children with his second, younger wife, Varina Howell Davis, but only two survived him. Many historians attribute the Confederacy's weaknesses to the leadership of President Davis.[3] His preoccupation with detail, reluctance to delegate responsibility, lack of popular appeal, feuds with powerful state governors, favoritism toward old friends, inability to get along with people who disagreed with him, neglect of civil matters in favor of military ones, and resistance to public opinion all worked against him.[4][5] Historians agree he was a much less effective war leader than his Union counterpart Abraham Lincoln. After Davis was captured in 1865, he was accused of treason but was not tried and was released after two years. While not disgraced, Davis had been displaced in ex-Confederate affection after the war by his leading general, Robert E. Lee. Davis wrote a memoir entitled The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, which he completed in 1881. By the late 1880s, he began to encourage reconciliation, telling Southerners to be loyal to the Union. Ex-Confederates came to appreciate his role as a Southern patriot and he became a hero of the Lost Cause in the New South.[6] Some portions of his legacy were created not as memorials, but as contemporary recognition of his service at the time. Fort Davis National Historic Site began as a frontier military post in October 1854, in the mountains of western Texas. It was named after then-United States Secretary of War Jefferson Davis. That fort gave its name to the surrounding Davis Mountains range, and the town of Fort Davis. The surrounding area was designated Jeff Davis County in 1887, with the town of Fort Davis as the county seat. Numerous memorials to Jefferson Davis were created. The largest is the 351-foot (107 m) concrete obelisk located at the Jefferson Davis State Historic Site in Fairview, Kentucky, marking his birthplace. Construction of the monument began in 1917 and finished in 1924 at a cost of about $200,000.[10] In 1913, the United Daughters of the Confederacy conceived the Jefferson Davis Memorial Highway, a transcontinental highway to be built through the South.[163][164] Portions of the highway's route in Virginia, Alabama and other states still bear the name of Jefferson Davis.[163] Davis appeared on several postage stamps issued by the Confederacy, including its first postage stamp (issued in 1861). In 1995, his portrait appeared on a United States postage stamp, part of a series of 20 stamps commemorating the 130th anniversary of end of the Civil War.[165][166] Davis was also celebrated on the 6-cent Stone Mountain Memorial Carving commemorative on September 19, 1970, at Stone Mountain, Georgia. The stamp portrayed Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson on horseback. It depicts a replica of the actual memorial, carved into the side of Stone Mountain at 400 feet (120 m) above ground level, the largest high relief sculpture in the world. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_Davis

The American Colonization Society

The American Colonization Society

Group 2 Edited by: Daniel Conforti Narrator: Kyle Riley Research and Works Cited: Alejandro Reyes

A Fireside Chat: Looking at the Emancipation Proclamation

A Fireside Chat: Looking at the Emancipation Proclamation

"A Fireside Chat: Looking at the Emancipation Proclamation." Sponsored by the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission, and held on September 21, 2012 at the University of Mary Washington. The preliminary Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Lincoln on September 22, 1862, days following the Battle of Antietam. It became effective January 1, 1863 as the nation entered its third year of civil war, forever changing the course of the war. Without question, the Emancipation Proclamation is one of the great American documents of freedom. In a program sponsored by the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission, three of the foremost Lincoln scholars gathered to interpret, evaluate, and remember the Emancipation Proclamation at its 150th anniversary: Edna Greene Medford, history department chair at Howard University, specializing in 19th-century African American history. Frank Williams, founding chair of the Lincoln Forum and recently retired Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island. Harold Holzer, a leading authority on Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War, senior vice president for government relations and public affairs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Introductory remarks by James I. Robertson, Jr. Discussion hosted by Lynwood J. Evans Watch Medford, Williams, and Holzer in a "Fireside Chat" as they discuss the Emancipation Proclamation from three distinct perspectives: - The legal, political, and military pressures on Lincoln - The historical influence of and response to the proclamation by African Americans - The role pictorial images played afterward in establishing the document and its author in public memory

The Open Mind - Barack Obama and Abraham Lincoln as Presidents-Elect

The Open Mind - Barack Obama and Abraham Lincoln as Presidents-Elect

Guest: Harold Holzer, Co-chairman of the United States Lincoln Bicentennial Commission (Taped: 11-07-2008) In May 1956, Richard D. Heffner, American historian, broadcaster, and University Professor of Communications and Public Policy at Rutgers, began a weekly public television series called The Open Mind. Well ahead of its time, the program has welcomed hundreds of interesting and influential persons from all fields to speak freely and to share their thoughts and ideas with a broad audience. Watch more of The Open Mind at CUNY TV: http://www.cuny.tv/show/openmind OM08 032

Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography...

Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography...

Frederick Douglass, ex-slave turned leading abolitionist, was the most photographed American of the 19th century. Now, as a result of research by John Stauffer, Douglass has emerged as a leading pioneer in photography, both as a stately subject and as a prescient theorist who believed in the explosive social power of this early art form. A book signing follows the program.

The Battle of Fredericksburg

The Battle of Fredericksburg

The NPG's Warren Perry visits the Frederickburg National Military Park and discusses the Battle of Fredericksburg, which took placed on December 13, 1862. Part of our ongoing series commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. --- General George McClellan spent a lot of time fretting about how to get at the Confederate heart in Richmond in the spring and summer of 1862, but his campaign failed. Antietam, though not a setback, was certainly not the great victory for which President Abraham Lincoln had hoped. Lincoln, dissatisfied with the general's performance, bid goodbye to him in October of 1862 and replaced him with Ambrose Burnside; Burnside had no intention of his mission being misinterpreted. Burnside wanted to take Richmond. Cooked into his notions of taking the Confederate capital was also some hope of recovering his reputation from a slippery performance at Antietam. Burnside planned to plow the distance between Washington and Richmond with his McClellan-trained Army of the Potomac. Halfway between these two cities Richmond lay embedded his one big obstacle—the Army of Northern Virginia, under the command of Robert E. Lee. With well over 100,000 men, Burnside had a head of steam and was prepared to confront Lee until he came to his first great challenge—the Rappahannock River, which ran west-to-east on the north side of Fredericksburg. Although the Rappahannock was by no means a large river, it was sufficiently cold and sufficiently deep to heel the momentum of such a large force. The river cost Burnside time, and this would figure greatly into the outcome of the battle. While Burnside was compelled to fritter away valuable hours and days attempting to conduct his troops across the water, Lee had a surfeit of time to entrench his own men into what would be the best strategic defensive position he would ever enjoy. Burnside, handpicked by Lincoln to conduct, and if possible, to close out the war, found himself stopped in the cold early December of 1862, waiting for his engineers to provide him with pontoons for crossing the Rappahannock. As Burnside waited, imagining a decisive victory at Richmond in the weeks to come, Lee's army, some 70,000 rebels, dug in behind stone walls, mounted artillery on hillsides, and prepared to sacrifice the growing trade town of Fredericksburg in order to prevent the loss of the Confederate capital. As an aside to all this, a young officer in the Union army, George Washington Whitman, the brother of a poet from New York City, would play a tangential role in bringing that brother into the forefront of the war's service, the war's journals, and ultimately, into the way the United States would memorialize the war through poetry. This battle would also lead the young poet into the building that would later come to contain the collections of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and the American Art Museum.

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