Gotti (1996) - Multi-sub

Gotti (1996) - Multi-sub

subtitles in youtube video settings

Jez na potoce

Jez na potoce

Potok u všeradic se rozvodnuje.

6-7.6.17 g/j=BEP, g/j=SL, g/j=TP 1d2 (pot.1d3)

6-7.6.17 g/j=BEP, g/j=SL, g/j=TP 1d2 (pot.1d3)

6-7.6.17 g/j=BEP, g/j=SL, g/j=TP 1d2 (pot.1d3)

Xindloviny na radiu City / Jack, pot a slzy (23.5.2015)

Xindloviny na radiu City / Jack, pot a slzy (23.5.2015)

Je tomu pár dní zpět, kdy jistý Čech (nebo Češka) vyhrál/a Euro Jackpot, konkrétně dvě a půl miliardy korun. To neuniklo ani Xindlovi X, a tak pro vás složil další tematickou píseň. Mrkněte na video. URL: www.radiocity.cz FB: www.facebook.com/city937 TW: www.twitter.com/city937 YT: www.youtube.com/city937 Lyrics: 1. Kámo, jsem v háji, vyhrál jsem balík A teď furt utrácím jako Alík Skupuju akcie a obligace A věci, co do nich jde oblíkat se Koupil jsem zámek, koupil jsem káru Pozemky pro sebe, bráchu i šváru Koupil jsem jachtu i s plachtama Ale furt nevím, co s prachama Všichni jsou se mnou teď kamarádi Ať přijdu kamkoliv, mají mě rádi Každý v mé blízkosti chtěl by žít A ať křesťan či žid chtěl by založit Volal i Andrej, že prej o mě čet A že mi posílá svý číslo na účet A že jestli prej nechci jít bručet Ať mu pomůžu zalepit státní rozpočet REF: Od dob co vyhrál jsem v jackpotu Prožívám jenom peklo tu Chci zase žít jako holota Kámoši, pivo a robota Od dob, co vyhrál jsem v jackpotu Jdou po mě zástupy kokotů Chtěl bych být zase tuctový Chtěl bych být prostě jako vy 2. Kozatý baby už lezou mi krkem Číhají na mě za každým smrkem Co chvíli ke mně přihopká Další a další zlatokopka Chtějí mě pro prachy či mě fakt maj rády Protože jim imponujou mý dvě krásný brady Mý chlupatý záda a čtyři dioptrie To teď kvůli těm prachům mi trochu nejasný je Dřív jsem holky balil na to, Co napsal Terry Pratchett Ale vod tý doby, co mám tyhle kachle Holky už neřešej, co vše jsem přečet Teď mě chtěj na Nově, chtějí mě v blesku Chtějí mi postavit pamětní desku Jsem v jednom kole, říkám si: ty vole Mít tolik prachů, to je fakt řehole REF: Od dob co vyhrál jsem v jackpotu Prožívám jen peklo tu Chci zas střádat na nájem Chci zas holek nezájem Od dob, co vyhrál jsem v jackpotu Jdou po mě zástupy kokotů Chtěl bych být zas tuctový Chtěl bych mít zas kulový... jako vy

vltava tour 2

vltava tour 2

Vodáci Jindřišky si dávají jez v Českém Krumlově

Rychlé svlékání

Rychlé svlékání

:-d

TV SEVERKA - Mladý Mário je za marihuanu za mrežami

TV SEVERKA - Mladý Mário je za marihuanu za mrežami

www.severka.tv

Suspense: The High Wall / Too Many Smiths / Your Devoted Wife

Suspense: The High Wall / Too Many Smiths / Your Devoted Wife

The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Subways Are for Sleeping / Only Johnny Knows / Colloquy 2: A Dissertation on Love

Subways Are for Sleeping / Only Johnny Knows / Colloquy 2: A Dissertation on Love

Subways Are for Sleeping is a musical with a book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Jule Styne. The original Broadway production played in 1961-62. The musical was inspired by an article about subway homelessness in the March 1956 issue of Harper's and a subsequent 1957 book based on it, both by Edmund G. Love, who slept on subway trains throughout the 1950s and encountered many unique individuals. With the profits from his book, Love then embarked on a bizarre hobby: over the course of several years, he ate dinner at every restaurant listed in the Manhattan yellow pages directory, visiting them in alphabetical order. After two previews, the Broadway production, directed and choreographed by Michael Kidd, opened on December 27, 1961 at the St. James Theatre, where it ran for 205 performances. The cast included Orson Bean, Sydney Chaplin, Carol Lawrence, Gordon Connell, Grayson Hall, and Green's wife Phyllis Newman (whose costume, consisting solely of a towel, was probably Freddy Wittop's easiest design in his distinguished career), with newcomers Michael Bennett and Valerie Harper in the chorus. Subways Are for Sleeping opened to mostly negative reviews. The show already was hampered by a lack of publicity, since the New York City Transit Authority refused to post advertisements on the city's buses and in subway trains and stations for fear they would be perceived as officially sanctioning the right of vagrants to use these facilities as overnight accommodations. Producer David Merrick and press agent Harvey Sabinson decided to invite individuals with the same names as prominent theatre critics (such as Walter Kerr, Richard Watts, Jr. and Howard Taubman) to see the show and afterwards used their favorable comments in print ads. Thanks to photographs of the seven "critics" accompanying their blurbs (the well-known real Richard Watts was not African American), the ad was discovered to be a deception by a copy editor. It was pulled from most newspapers, but not before running in an early edition of the New York Herald Tribune. However, the clever publicity stunt allowed the musical to continue to run and it eventually turned a small profit. Newman won the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, and nominations went to Bean for Best Featured Actor and Kidd's choreography. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subways_Are_For_Sleeping

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