NYS Free Sexual Harassment Policy and Complaint Form Employer BEWARE in under 6 minutes!

NYS Free Sexual Harassment Policy and Complaint Form  Employer BEWARE  in under 6 minutes!

Join Jennifer for a quick chat about the NYS Free Sexual Harassment forms - Employee policy and Complaint form. Learn why she believes the proposed documents are not necessarily in the employer's best interest and may lead to unnecessary and unwanted claims by opportunistic employees.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/sexual-harassment-in-the-workplace Video Highlights: 1:28: The first step in preventing harassment is establishing a zero tolerance policy. Clearly state that NO form of harassment will be accepted at your workplace, including not only sexual harassment, but also harassment due to race, religion, ethnic background, age or disability. Publish the policy in your handbook and post it prominently on your company intranet or internal website. 1:52: Next, offer employees training in how to recognize harassment. Make sure they understand what types of actions and behaviors constitute sexual harassment and what things do not constitute sexual harassment. 3:36: Make this process as simple as possible for your employees by providing accessible points of contacts for employees to bring complaints. Your policy should also assure employees that they will not suffer retaliation as a result of any complaint made in good faith. Retaliation is against the law.

What does bullying and harassment mean for you and your workplace?

What does bullying and harassment mean for you and your workplace?

A short video explaining workplace bullying and harassment and the legal duties in BC for workers, employers, and supervisors.

How to Sue for Wrongful Termination

How to Sue for Wrongful Termination

Watch more How to Understand Legal Issues videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/258268-How-to-Sue-for-Wrongful-Termination Recently terminated employees may harbor ill feelings against their former employer – but not everyone has a case for wrongful termination. Find out whether you might prevail in court with this advice. Step 1: Know when regulations are on your side Know that you have a case if your employer has violated state or federal discrimination law, employment-related provisions in the Fair Credit Reporting Act or Bankruptcy Act, or the company's own policy. Step 2: Stand up for your rights Stand up if your employer fires you for reasonably exercising your rights under labor laws, participating in a union, or taking leave for military service or under the Family and Medical Leave Act. Tip Your employer cannot legally terminate you for refusing to break a law or for whistle-blowing. Step 3: Plan your exit Inquire about why you were terminated. Retain the company handbook and any records that may prove that your employer treated you unfairly. Become familiar with your employment agreement's provisions. Step 4: Weigh your options File a complaint, if appropriate, with the appropriate government agency, and/or file a private lawsuit. Step 5: File a complaint form Bring your complaint to the Department of Labor, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Step 6: Brace for a battle Recognize that the Doctrine of Employment At Will, which states that an employer can terminate an employee at will and without consequence, can make it difficult to prove wrongful termination. Tip Request and negotiate a severance package and obtain all severance agreements in writing. Step 7: Seek out an attorney Seek the advice of a labor law attorney sooner rather than later due to statutes of limitation. Lawyers often take winnable wrongful termination cases on a contingency basis. Did You Know? One study found that plaintiffs in wrongful termination suits prevailed at trial between 47% and 57% of the time.

Racially Offensive Remarks in the Workplace

Racially Offensive Remarks in the Workplace

http://blog.hr360.com/racially-offensive-remarks-in-the-workplace-video-blog Video Highlights: 00:03 Over the past few decades, employers have recognized how the input and unique contributions of employees with varying backgrounds can help to build a vital, productive, and profitable workforce. At the same time, managers must be sensitive to actions or behaviors that are offensive to members of their teams and take immediate steps to put a stop to such conduct. 01:33 First, they are just that: offensive and alienating. Such remarks can demotivate employees and harm a company’s reputation, both internally and among clients or customers. Finally, these kinds of remarks may rise to the level of unlawful harassment. 01:49 Harassment is a form of employment discrimination that violates federal law and the law in many states. Under federal law, harassment is defined as unwelcome conduct that is based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. 02:07 Harassment is illegal when enduring the offensive conduct becomes a condition of continued employment, or the conduct is severe or pervasive enough to create a work environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, hostile, or abusive. 02:30 Importantly, the victim does not have to be the person harassed, but can be anyone affected by the offensive conduct. In certain cases, employers may be held liable for workplace harassment. 02:41 With so much at stake, managers must respond forcefully to any instances of racially or ethnically offensive remarks or behaviors that occur in their presence or come to their attention. 03:50 It is also essential for employees to know that they will not face retaliation for reporting or complaining about any instances of offensive behavior, or for participating in any investigations regarding such conduct. 04:02 As a general rule, all companies should have a policy in place that clearly states a commitment to workplace diversity and outlines the consequences for discriminatory conduct. 04:25 Commit to implementing workplace diversity best practices, including not making assumptions based on race, ethnicity, gender, disability, or the like; respecting all cultures, traditions, and circumstances that may require accommodation; refusing to allow inappropriate jokes, language, or behavior; treating all employees equitably; and engaging in ongoing dialogue regarding diversity.

EEOC Calls for Increased Harassment Prevention (with Bill Milani)

EEOC Calls for Increased Harassment Prevention (with Bill Milani)

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) urges increased harassment prevention measures in the workplace. About one third of charges filed with the agency in 2015 involved claims of some form of harassment. The agency recommends that employers update their worker training to focus on bystander intervention and workplace civility. In addition, employers should increase their own awareness of risk factors. These include physical isolation of workers and significant power disparities. Bill Milani, from Epstein Becker Green, has more: "The report suggests employers should take a number of actions concerning harassment in the workplace. First, an audit of organizational risk factors as outlined by EEOC. ... Second, a review of your policies against discrimination and harassment to ensure that they are current, they reference all of the protected classes, not just sexual harassment, but harassment based on race, color, religion, ethnicity. Training. Training is vital. Training for all employees on anti-harassment. ... On top of the training that all employees received, managers trained to understand their heightened responsibilities as the employer, managers trained to understand their role in the complaint procedure. And finally, crucial that leadership embrace and be accountable for issues of workplace conduct." This is an extended interview from Employment Law This Week (Episode 33: Week of July 11, 2016), an online series by Epstein Becker Green. Visit http://www.EmploymentLawThisWeek.com. These materials have been provided for informational purposes only and are not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. The content of these materials is copyrighted to Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

News Wrap: Pentagon rolls out new sexual harassment policy

News Wrap: Pentagon rolls out new sexual harassment policy

In our News Wrap Thursday, the Pentagon will permanently mark the records of service members accused of sexual harassment or bullying on the job or online. Also, former President George W. Bush said it is “pretty clear” Russians meddled in the 2016 elections, but not whether it affected the outcome.

Camera Catches Police threatening and Harassing citizen for asking for Complaint Form

Camera Catches Police threatening and Harassing citizen for asking for Complaint Form

Camera Catches Police threatening and Harassing citizen for asking for Complaint Form

How to report bullying and harassment at work

How to report bullying and harassment at work

Subscribe to our channel here http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfTFzc4dB3aLLzYRG-btyNw?sub_confirmation=1 Bullying and harassment are causing stress, anxiety and uncomfortable working conditions for many people at work. It is not necessarily always obvious or apparent to others, and may happen in the workplace without an employer's awareness. In order to eradicate this type of behaviour, workers need to know what they can do to report these incidents so that appropriate actions can be taken. This video gives examples of different types of bullying and harassment behaviour, and shows what kind of information should be collected in order to report the behaviour effectively. It also explains the different options for making a disclosure, which is particularly important if the person responsible for the unwanted behaviour is the victim’s line manager Please subscribe to our YouTube Chanel to get updates on new videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfTFzc4dB3aLLzYRG-btyNw You can see all our videos on the Showreel page on our website: www.whatyouneedtoknow.co.uk/showreel

Maxine Waters Officially Requested To Resign

Maxine Waters Officially Requested To Resign

Republican Congressman Andy Biggs from Arizona introduced a measure on Monday calling on the Democrat congresswoman from California Maxine Waters to apologize to the White House for “endangering their lives and sowing seeds of discord.” The initiative also asks for censure with would force the congresswoman from her position and to release a public statement saying harassment or violence isn’t a form of protest. This measure comes after Waters encouraged harassment of Trump White House administration officials over the weekend at a rally in Los Angeles. Last weekend the Congresswoman said told anyone who sees members from Trump’s Cabinet in a restaurant, or a department store, or at a gasoline station, to create a crowd in order to push back on them. And to tell them “they’re not welcome anymore, anywhere.” These comments obviously sparked condemnation across the political spectrum, from both sides of the aisle. She later told MSNBC that protesters are “going to absolutely harass them.” Here is more via Newsmax: “The California Democrat told MSNBC, “These members of his Cabinet who remain and try to defend him, they’re not going to be able to go to a restaurant, they’re not going to be able to stop at a gas station, they’re not going to be able to shop at a department store. The people are going to turn on them. They’re going to protest. They’re absolutely going to harass them until they decide that they’re going to tell the president, ‘No, I can’t hang with you.’ This is wrong. This is unconscionable.” She was referring to several instances where the public has already angrily confronted White House officials in public spaces over the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy toward illegal immigrants, which led to the separation of parents from their children. Waters emphasized, “I have no sympathy for these people that are in this administration who know it’s wrong what they’re doing on so many fronts, but they tend to not want to confront this president or even leave, but they know what they’re doing is wrong.” The Biggs’ initiative states that Waters’ statements could “directly and unnecessarily lead to public unrest, physical violence, and physical injury.” Not a far-fetched notion since members of the cabinet have already been harassed before. The initiative currently has the full support of five members of Congress. Biggs told The Hill that Waters’ comments do “not become somebody who’s in Congress” and that “everybody agrees that it was just highly objectionable what she did.” Here is more on this breaking news via Fox News: “A Republican Congressman on Monday introduced an initiative to censure California Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters and ask for her resignation after she encouraged others to confront Trump administration officials. Rep. Andy Biggs, R-AZ., introduced a measure calling on the congresswoman to apologize to the White House for “endangering their lives and sowing seeds of discord,” resign from her position, and release a public statement saying harassment or violence isn’t a form of protest. The measure comes after Waters encouraged harassment of Trump administration officials over the weekend at a rally in Los Angeles. “If you see anybody from that Cabinet in a restaurant, in a department store, at a gasoline station, you get out and you create a crowd and you push back on them, and you tell them they’re not welcome anymore, anywhere,” she said, sparking condemnation across the political spectrum. She later told MSNBC that protesters are “going to absolutely harass them.” The Biggs’ motion claims that Waters’ statements could “directly and unnecessarily lead to public unrest, physical violence, and physical injury” and that members of the administration have already been harassed in public. The motion reportedly already attracted the support of five members of Congress. Biggs told The Hill that Waters’ comments do “not become somebody who’s in Congress” and that “everybody agrees that it was just highly objectionable what she did.” “So we just introduced it, we have some co-sponsors, but what she did was to basically incite people to come after and attack members of the president’s cabinet,” he said. “And also spread that out to more people.” ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ◆ Latest news videos: http://bit.ly/2Kn8KeN ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ★ CONNECT WITH US ★ ◆ Google+: http://bit.ly/2LPVNjq ◆ Email: info.khung@gmail.com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Videos can use content-based copyright law contains reasonable use Fair Use (https://www.youtube.com/yt/copyright/)

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