Hana Holišová jako Shania Twain – "Man! I Feel Like A Woman " | Tvoje tvář má známý hlas

Hana Holišová jako Shania Twain – "Man! I Feel Like A Woman " | Tvoje tvář má známý hlas

Velkolepá zábavná show Tvoje tvář má známý hlas každou sobotu ve 20:20 na Nově! #tvojetvar Oficiální stránka: http://tvojetvar.nova.cz/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tvojetvarmaznamyhlas/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tvojetvarmaznamyhlas/

Sweet Dreams - The Eurythmics (A Cappella Holly Henry Cover)

Sweet Dreams - The Eurythmics (A Cappella Holly Henry Cover)

Official Holly Henry cover of "Sweet Dreams" by The Eurythmics. Get my new Album: http://bit.ly/hhKgPn | Subscribe: http://bit.ly/hhSub Anddd again with the slightly cheesy split-screen. But, I didn't really see another way to do it aha. This was made with my voice and a metronome and it was really really fun. Huzzahhh I hope you like. https://hollyhenry.bandcamp.com/ Follow Holly Henry: Instagram: https://instagram.com/hollymaehenry/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/hollyhenrymusic/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hollymaehenry SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/hollyhenry-1 Download this cover: https://soundcloud.com/hollyhenry-1/sweet-dreams-are-made-of-this-cover Website: http://hollyhenrymusic.com/ Merch: http://hollyhenry.spreadshirt.com/ Watch More Holly Henry: Covers: http://bit.ly/hhCovrs Originals: http://bit.ly/hhOrgls Popular Videos: http://bit.ly/hhMstPop Latest Uploads: http://bit.ly/hhLtsVds Watch by Genre: http://bit.ly/hhGenre Watch by Year: http://bit.ly/hhYear

Omega: Gyöngyhajú lány (The girl with pearly hair) + piano sheets

Omega: Gyöngyhajú lány (The girl with pearly hair) + piano sheets

Sheet music: http://easypiano.cz/sheetmusic/634/omega-gyongyhaju-lany Music by: Gábor Presser | Piano arrangement: Jan Koláček Facebook: http://facebook.com/EasyPianoCZ Covered by: Scorpions - White Dove Serbian version: Griva - Devojka biserne kose Czech version: Aleš Brichta - Dívka s perlami ve vlasech Re-sampled: Kanye West - New Slaves

Ned Miller - Go On Back, You Fool

Ned Miller -  Go On Back, You Fool

Ned Miller - Go On Back You Fool --sound recording administered by INgrooves --I do not own the copyright to this music "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Ana Aldeguer (ft.María Aldeguer) - You sound good to me (Lucy Hale) - Cover

Ana Aldeguer (ft.María Aldeguer) - You sound good to me (Lucy Hale) - Cover

Redes Sociales /Social Network: Blog: www.annaaldeguer.blogspot.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/annaldeguer Twitter:@annaaldeguer Instagram: @annaaldeguer Aprovechando el poco tiempo libre que tengo, aunque hace muy poco subí una cover, aquí os traigo una nueva con la colaboración de mi hermana pequeña que aunque parece que lleve cara de amargura en el vídeo, dice que es porque estaba concentrada para no perder el ritmo y lo ha hecho bastante bien :) Sé que no son canciones muy muy conocidas, pero, sinceramente, a mi me gusta cantar las canciones que me gustan y esta en especial desde que la escuché me ha gustado un montón. Por si no lo sabéis Lucy Hale es una actriz que ahora está haciendo una serie que me tiene enganchada desde 2010 y es Pequeñas mentirosas, y esta es su primera canción como cantante solitaria country, así que nada más, como siempre, espero que os guste y muchos besitossss. Ana Taking advantage of the little time I have, although I recently uploaded a cover, here I bring you a new collaboration with my little sister that has done it quite well :) I know the songs that I sing are not very popular songs, but honestly, I like to sing the songs I like and this especially since I heard it I liked a lot. Lucy Hale is an actress who is now doing a serie that has me hooked since 2010, Pretty Little Liars, and this is her first song as lonely country singer, so that's all, as always, I hope you like, many kisses. Ana

ask me questions on my new blog

ask me questions on my new blog

ask away :) www.riarain.tumblr.com

Words at War: Eighty-Three Days: The Survival Of Seaman Izzi / Paris Underground / Shortcut to Tokyo

Words at War: Eighty-Three Days: The Survival Of Seaman Izzi / Paris Underground / Shortcut to Tokyo

The French Résistance has had a great influence on literature, particularly in France. A famous example is the poem "Strophes pour se souvenir", which was written by the communist academic Louis Aragon in 1955 to commemorate the heroism of the Manouchian Group, whose 23 members were shot by the Nazis. The Résistance is also portrayed in Jean Renoir's wartime This Land is Mine (1943), which was produced in the USA. In the immediate post-war years, French cinema produced a number of films that portrayed a France broadly present in the Résistance.[188][189] The 1946 La Bataille du rail depicted the courageous efforts of French railway workers to sabotage German reinforcement trains,[190] and in the same year Le Père tranquille told the story of a quiet insurance agent secretly involved in the bombing of a factory.[190] Collaborators were hatefully presented as a rare minority, as played by Pierre Brewer in Jéricho (1946) or Serge Reggiani in Les Portes de la nuit (1946), and movements such as the Milice were rarely evoked. In the 1950s, a less heroic interpretation of the Résistance to the occupation gradually began to emerge.[190] In Claude Autant-Lara's La Traversée de Paris (1956), the portrayal of the city's black market and general mediocrity revealed the reality of war-profiteering during the occupation.[191] In the same year, Robert Bresson presented A Man Escaped, in which an imprisoned Résistance activist works with a reformed collaborator inmate to escape.[192] A cautious reappearance of the image of Vichy emerged in Le Passage du Rhin (1960), in which a crowd successively acclaim both Pétain and de Gaulle.[193] After General de Gaulle's return to power in 1958, the portrayal of the Résistance returned to its earlier résistancialisme. In this manner, in Is Paris Burning? (1966), "the role of the resistant was revalued according to [de Gaulle's] political trajectory".[194] The comic form of films such as La Grande Vadrouille (1966) widened the image of Résistance heroes to average Frenchmen.[195] The most famous and critically acclaimed of all the résistancialisme movies is Army of Shadows (L'Armee des ombres), which was made by the French film-maker Jean-Pierre Melville in 1969. The film was inspired by Joseph Kessel's 1943 book, as well as Melville's own experiences, as he had fought in the Résistance and participated in Operation Dragoon. A 1995 television screening of L'Armee des ombres described it as "the best film made about the fighters of the shadows, those anti-heroes."[196] The shattering of France's résistancialisme following the events of May 1968 emerged particularly clearly in French cinema. The candid approach of the 1971 documentary The Sorrow and the Pity pointed the finger on anti-Semitism in France and disputed the official Résistance ideals.[197][198] Time magazine's positive review of the film wrote that director Marcel Ophüls "tries to puncture the bourgeois myth—or protectively askew memory—that allows France generally to act as if hardly any Frenchmen collaborated with the Germans."[199] Franck Cassenti, with L'Affiche Rouge (1976); Gilson, with La Brigade (1975); and Mosco with the documentary Des terroristes à la retraite addressed foreign resisters of the EGO, who were then relatively unknown. In 1974, Louis Malle's Lacombe, Lucien caused scandal and polemic because of his absence of moral judgment with regard to the behavior of a collaborator.[200] Malle later portrayed the resistance of Catholic priests who protected Jewish children in his 1987 film Au revoir, les enfants. François Truffaut's 1980 film Le Dernier Métro was set during the German occupation of Paris and won ten Césars for its story of a theatre production taking place while its Jewish director is concealed by his wife in the theatre's basement.[201] The 1980s began to portray the resistance of working women, as in Blanche et Marie (1984).[202] Later, Jacques Audiard's Un héros très discret (1996) told the story of a young man's traveling to Paris and manufacturing a Résistance past for himself, suggesting that many heroes of the Résistance were imposters.[203][204] In 1997, Claude Berri produced the biopic Lucie Aubrac based on the life of the Résistance heroine of the same name, which was criticized for its Gaullist portrayal of the Résistance and over-emphasis on the relationship between Aubrac and her husband.[205] In the 2011 video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, in which a hypothetical World War III is depicted, a French resistance movement is formed to act against Russian occupation. The playable characters of many factions in-game receive assistance from this Resistance . This is in line with previous, World War II-based Call of Duty games, which often featured involvement with the Resistance of that era. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Resistance

Words at War: Headquarters Budapest / Nazis Go Underground / Simone

Words at War: Headquarters Budapest / Nazis Go Underground / Simone

Nazi Germany, also known as the Third Reich, is the common name for Germany when it was a totalitarian state ruled by Adolf Hitler and his National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP). On 30 January 1933 Hitler became Chancellor of Germany, quickly eliminating all opposition to rule as sole leader. The state idolized Hitler as its Führer ("leader"), centralizing all power in his hands. Historians have emphasized the hypnotic effect of his rhetoric on large audiences, and of his eyes in small groups. Kessel writes, "Overwhelmingly...Germans speak with mystification of Hitler's 'hypnotic' appeal..."[4] Under the "leader principle", the Führer's word was above all other laws. Top officials reported to Hitler and followed his policies, but they had considerable autonomy. The government was not a coordinated, cooperating body, but rather a collection of factions struggling to amass power and gain favor with the Führer.[5] In the midst of the Great Depression, the Nazi government restored prosperity and ended mass unemployment using heavy military spending and a mixed economy of free-market and central-planning practices.[6] Extensive public works were undertaken, including the construction of the Autobahns. The return to prosperity gave the regime enormous popularity; the suppression of all opposition made Hitler's rule mostly unchallenged. Racism, especially antisemitism, was a main tenet of society in Nazi Germany. The Gestapo (secret state police) and SS under Heinrich Himmler destroyed the liberal, socialist, and communist opposition, and persecuted and murdered Jews and other "undesirables". It was believed that the Germanic peoples—who were also referred to as the Nordic race—were the purest representation of the Aryan race, and were therefore the master race. Education focused on racial biology, population policy, and physical fitness. Membership in the Hitler Youth organization became compulsory. The number of women enrolled in post-secondary education plummeted, and career opportunities were curtailed. Calling women's rights a "product of the Jewish intellect," the Nazis practiced what they called "emancipation from emancipation."[7] Entertainment and tourism were organized via the Strength Through Joy program. The government controlled artistic expression, promoting specific forms of art and discouraging or banning others. The Nazis mounted the infamous Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art) exhibition in 1937.[8] Propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels made effective use of film, mass rallies, and Hitler's hypnotizing oratory to control public opinion.[9] The 1936 Summer Olympics showcased the Third Reich on the international stage. Germany made increasingly aggressive demands, threatening war if they were not met. Britain and France responded with appeasement, hoping Hitler would finally be satisfied.[10] Austria was annexed in 1938, and the Sudetenland was taken via the Munich Agreement in 1938, with the rest of Czechoslovakia taken over in 1939. Hitler made a pact with Joseph Stalin and invaded Poland in September 1939, starting World War II. In alliance with Benito Mussolini's Italy, Germany conquered France and most of Europe by 1940, and threatened its remaining major foe: Great Britain. Reich Commissariats took brutal control of conquered areas, and a German administration termed the General Government was established in Poland. Concentration camps, established as early as 1933, were used to hold political prisoners and opponents of the regime. The number of camps quadrupled between 1939 and 1942 to 300+, as slave-laborers from across Europe, Jews, political prisoners, criminals, homosexuals, gypsies, the mentally ill and others were imprisoned. The system that began as an instrument of political oppression culminated in the mass genocide of Jews and other minorities in the Holocaust. Following the German invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, the tide turned against the Third Reich in the major military defeats of the Battle of Stalingrad and the Battle of Kursk in 1943. The Soviet counter-attacks became the largest land battles in history. Large-scale systematic bombing of all major German cities, rail lines and oil plants escalated in 1944, shutting down the Luftwaffe (German Air Force). Germany was overrun in 1945 by the Soviets from the east and the Allies from the west. The victorious Allies initiated a policy of denazification and put the Nazi leadership on trial for war crimes at the Nuremberg Trials. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazi_Germany

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