Managing Difficult Employees

Managing Difficult Employees

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/managing-a-difficult-employee-video-blog Video Highlights: 0:42 Managing a difficult employee is one of the biggest challenges a supervisor can face. We’re talking about individuals who are not violating company policy or breaking the law, but whose demeanor, attitude and behavior are off-putting to others. 01:12 Left unaddressed, a difficult employee has the potential to do serious harm to overall workplace morale and productivity, and can even drive other valuable employees away from the department or company. 01:29 You must be responsive to the issues and complaints of the offending employee’s colleagues. Don’t brush them off. Document the complaints in detail, and ask for specific examples of the behavior in question. 01:49 Address the employee in question. This is understandably uncomfortable, but it must be done. Ideally, you will speak with the employee immediately following an incident, so that the event is fresh in his or her mind. 02:19 Follow an established protocol of steps based on a progressive discipline policy. Start with a conversation, or counseling session. If the behaviors persist, move to a verbal and then a written warning. 03:27 If all these efforts fail, you may be forced to consider reassignment or termination of the employee. However, absent special circumstances, this should generally be the last resort and done only after all other avenues have been exhausted.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/sexual-harassment-in-the-workplace Video Highlights: 1:28: The first step in preventing harassment is establishing a zero tolerance policy. Clearly state that NO form of harassment will be accepted at your workplace, including not only sexual harassment, but also harassment due to race, religion, ethnic background, age or disability. Publish the policy in your handbook and post it prominently on your company intranet or internal website. 1:52: Next, offer employees training in how to recognize harassment. Make sure they understand what types of actions and behaviors constitute sexual harassment and what things do not constitute sexual harassment. 3:36: Make this process as simple as possible for your employees by providing accessible points of contacts for employees to bring complaints. Your policy should also assure employees that they will not suffer retaliation as a result of any complaint made in good faith. Retaliation is against the law.

5 Must-Do’s for Employee Onboarding

5 Must-Do’s for Employee Onboarding

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/5-must-dos-for-employee-onboarding Video Highlights: 00:45 No matter what size your company is, a formal orientation is the best way to welcome new employees and introduce them to your organization. Orientation can range from a few hours to several days, depending on the amount of information to cover and the complexity of the position. 01:40 Orientation is the best time to complete and collect certain paperwork, such as the federal Form I-9, which verifies eligibility for employment. Employees must complete Form I-9 no later than their first day of work for pay. 02:12 Broadly review your company policies regarding attendance and leave, employee conduct, and safety and security. Cover expected hours of work as well as absenteeism, meal and break periods, and time off, including what types of notice you require. 02:46 A thorough onboarding program also covers compensation and benefits in as much depth as time allows. Provide details on pay periods, direct deposit, payroll deductions, health insurance, and any other benefits to which your new employee may be entitled. 03:21 Provide your new hire with a copy of your Employee Handbook. To a great degree, many of the policies and benefits information you’ve discussed will be repeated in the handbook. 04:03 Your onboarding process should include any necessary training to get the new hire up to speed. This may be informal, such as a time period of being “shown the ropes” by another employee, or more structured training as necessary, such as classes to master a specific computer program or customer service procedure.

How to Deliver Negative Feedback Fairly and Effectively

How to Deliver Negative Feedback Fairly and Effectively

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/how-to-deliver-negative-feedback-fairly-and-effectively-video-blog Video Highlights: 0:02 How to Deliver Negative Feedback Fairly and Effectively. 0:07 As a manager, you may find yourself avoiding these conversations in an effort to spare employees' feelings. 0:44 You aren't doing your employee any favors by withholding constructive criticism about where he or she needs to improve. 1:03 Provide constructive feedback regularly, rather than waiting for a formal review. 1:10 You do need to pay attention to the language you use when having these types of conversations. 1:17 Avoid any language or description of the employee that might be discriminatory according to state or federal labor law. 1:26 Be factual and limit your comments to performance rather than personality. 1:55 Start off by getting right to the point. 2:03 Outline where you are going with the conversation. 2:15 Fill the employee in with what you know about the situation or performance gap. 2:27 Carefully outline the consequences that await if there is no improvement in performance or a change in behavior. 2:42 You need to hear what the employee has to say. 3:05 Communicate a plan of action. 3:15 Summarize the conversation from both ends, finishing up with an outline of each person's responsibilities going forward. 3:32 Delivering negative feedback isn't easy, but it is critical to your employees' performance and your company's success. 3:40 Learn more about our subscription options our 'Discipline and Termination Kit,' go to www.hr360.com.

How to Conduct an Interview

How to Conduct an Interview

Video Highlights: 0:02 important tasks in conducting job interviews are preparing questions and evaluating candidates' answers 0:43 The Interview Environment 1:05 Meeting the Candidate 1:22 During the Interview 2:00 Closing the Interview 2:30 Learn more at www.hr360.com and click on the products tab "Interviewing and Hiring Kit"

Dress for Success: 3 Do's and Don'ts for Workplace Dress Codes

Dress for Success: 3 Do's and Don'ts for Workplace Dress Codes

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/dress-for-success-3-dos-and-donts-for-workplace-dress-codes-video-blog Video Highlights: 0:02 Today's topic is the office dress code. 0:27 Dress for Success: 3 Do's and Don'ts for Workplace Dress Codes. 0:34 Even "dress-down" Fridays have given way to an era in which "business casual" attire is generally acceptable every day in many offices. 0:50 You can't always leave it up to your employees' good judgment. 1:03 You might consider implementing a dress code. 1:19 Here are a few Do's to keep in mind when implementing a dress code. 1:24 communicate the dress code in a clear and unambiguous manner. 1:35 Articulate your company's desired image and offer suggestions of acceptable attire. 1:40 Specify when formal business attire is required. 1:50 Explain how the policy will be enforced. 1:54 Don't single out specific groups of employees. 2:10 Your dress code cannot treat employees less favorably because of: national origin, religious practices, and disability. 2:57 If you require your employees to pay for their own uniforms, that cost can't reduce their pay below the federal minimum wage or cut into overtime pay. 3:30 As you draft your company's dress code, it's a good idea to consult with an employment law attorney. 3:49 For more information on dress codes and policies, check out the U.S. Small Business Administration website at www.sba.gov.

Tips for Having Difficult Conversations with Employees

Tips for Having Difficult Conversations with Employees

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/tips-for-having-difficult-conversations-with-employees-video-blog Video Highlights: 00:12 The ability to have difficult conversations, and to make those conversations both effective and productive, is an essential skill for any good manager. 00:49 Most of us instinctually avoid unpleasant situations and conflict, particularly in the workplace where we spend a large portion of our waking hours. Remember, though, that avoiding a tough conversation won’t make the problem at hand go away; in fact, avoidance often makes the situation worse. 01:26 In cases outside the simple delivery of bad news, you should begin by evaluating the scope of the problem and then investigate the facts. For example, if an employee is routinely taking longer than the proscribed time for lunch, it may be the case that he or she is ill, or caring for a child or parent. Try your best to determine if there are outside or mitigating factors. 01:48 If you can’t resolve the issue, or have difficult news to deliver, you should plan your conversation carefully. 02:10 During the meeting, be specific and factual–for example, “I noticed that you came in after 10 six times in the last month.” Use “I phrases” whenever possible. 02:32 These semantic differences may seem small, but they can absolutely change how the message is received. 02:39 Remember to listen to the employee–either to his or her side of the story, or, in the case of unpleasant corporate news, to his or her feelings. You may gather important information that will help you proceed. 02:51 End the meeting by working together to agree on a resolution. This might include a formal performance improvement plan, offering the employee additional resources and training, or, in the case of a personal issue, providing access to the services of an employee assistance program.

How to Keep Your Employees Motivated

How to Keep Your Employees Motivated

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/how-to-keep-employees-motivated-video-blog Video Highlights: 0:04 Whether you’re the CEO of a Fortune 500 company or the owner of a five-person firm, you know that a motivated team is essential to your success. 0:47 According to a blog on the professional networking site, LinkedIn, there are three key areas to watch out for: workplace atmosphere, job standards, and employee productivity. 1:08 As a business owner or manager, you need to not only motivate employees, but also help them to motivate themselves. 1:15 Your goal is to create an environment that allows your employees to meet or exceed expectations, do their best, and feel valued. 1:25 Understanding what motivates employees comes down to knowing your staff as individuals. 1:39 Your best strategy is to offer a range of motivators to improve performance, enthusiasm, and retention. 1:45 Most employees can be motivated by tangible rewards such as salary and promotion. 1:55 There are many intangible motivators such as mentoring, personal and professional growth opportunities, and the ability to work independently that can also get the job done. 2:04 Indeed, offering your employees the chance to work without excessive supervision will show your faith and trust in them, as will allowing a flexible work schedule that enables them to attend to their personal needs. 2:15 It’s also important to recognize employees for jobs well done. This may be via a financial reward such as a bonus, but it can also take the form of a new job title that reflects higher status within the company, or company-wide public recognition and thanks. 2:41 Be sure to keep your employees challenged and engaged. 2:53 Consider offering more opportunities for employees to engage with your clients and customers, which can be highly rewarding. 3:05 Motivating employees comes down to knowing them as individuals. To do this, you must have open lines of communication and a mutual understanding of both professional and personal goals.

Five Fast Facts About FMLA (Family and Medical Leave Act)

Five Fast Facts About FMLA (Family and Medical Leave Act)

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/five-fast-facts-about-fmla-family-and-medical-leave-act-video-blog Video Highlights: 00:10 The FMLA helps employees balance the demands of their jobs with health needs and family commitments. As a supervisor, you need to know whether, when, and how FMLA applies to your company so you can stay in compliance with the law. 00:56 FMLA applies only to certain groups, including private sector employers who employ 50 or more employees for 20 or more weeks in the current or preceding calendar year, all public agencies, and all private and public elementary and secondary schools no matter their size. 01:15 Only certain employees are eligible to take FMLA leave. To be eligible for FMLA leave, an employee must work for a covered employer and must have worked for that employer for at least 12 months. 01:44 FMLA requires covered employers to provide eligible employees up to a total of 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a 12-month period for certain reasons including the birth and care of a newborn or newly adopted child; to care for an immediate family member with a serious health condition, and when the employee is unable to work because of a serious health conditions. 02:36 When requesting leave for the first time for an FMLA-qualifying reason, an employee does not need to specifically mention FMLA. 03:15 Employers covered by FMLA are required to post information in the workplace explaining rights and responsibilities under the law, and to formally respond to a request for FMLA leave—or when the employer obtains knowledge that the leave may be for an FMLA-qualifying reason—within five business days.

New Employee Orientation or Onboarding

New Employee Orientation or Onboarding

http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/new-employee-orientation-or-onboarding Video Highlights: 0:02 New Employee Orientations 0:26 Goal -- Familiarize the new employee with the company 0:41 Effective Onboarding Program 1:05 Absence of an Effective Onboarding Program

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