Fungi: Death Becomes Them - CrashCourse Biology #39

Fungi: Death Becomes Them - CrashCourse Biology #39

Death is what fungi are all about. By feasting on the deceased remains of almost all organisms on the planet, converting the organic matter back into soil from which new life will spring, they perform perhaps the most vital function in the global food web. Fungi, which thrive on death, make all life possible. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dft.ba/-8bCC Like CrashCourse? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Table of Contents 1) Biolography 02:07 2) Structure 04:53 3) The Decomposers 06:10 4) The Mutualists 06:38 5) The Predators 07:23 6) The Parasites 07:35 7) Reproduction 08:24 References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2i0c crashcourse, biology, hank green, fungi, fungus, detritivore, species, taxonomy, yeast, disease, death, organic matter, louis pasteur, biolography, beer, anaerobic respiration, fermentation, pasteurization, decompose, decomposition, soil, nutrient, recycle, mushroom, heterotroph, hyphae, chitin, mycelium, decomposer, mutualist, predator, parasite, enzyme, lignin, haustoria, mycorrhizae, sex, reproduction, spore, propagation, plasmogamy, asci, disperse, ascocarps, molds Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

The Wonderful Wolrd Of Fungi Documentary 2018

The Wonderful Wolrd Of Fungi Documentary 2018

Please subscribe for more documentaries, and give this video a thumbs up if you enjoyed watching. Also go and like our Facebook page:

Fungi

Fungi

Life on Earth 008 - Fungi Paul Andersen surveys the Kingdom Fungi. He starts with a brief description of the fungi phylogeny. He describes some of the major characteristics of fungi; heterotrophy, cell walls of chitin, hyphae, sessile. He describes the characteristics of five major phyla of fungi, ascomycota, basidiomycota, chytridiomycota, glomeromycota and zygomycota. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License

10 Fantastic Fungi Superpowers

10 Fantastic Fungi Superpowers

Join Hank Green to learn ten weird, scary, and amazing things fungi can do! Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Magic Mushrooms http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/publications/drug-profiles/mushrooms#medical http://www.cesar.umd.edu/cesar/drugs/psilocybin.asp http://science.howstuffworks.com/magic-mushroom6.htm Ergot Poisoning http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/witches-curse-clues-evidence/1501/ http://www.britannica.com/science/alkaloid Zombie Ants: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fungus-makes-zombie-ants/ http://news.psu.edu/story/323688/2014/08/22/research/zombie-ant-fungi-know-brains-their-hosts http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/603640 Medicinal Fungi: https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Penicillium http://herbarium.usu.edu/fungi/funfacts/penicillin.htm http://www.smw.ch/docs/pdf200x/2001/21/smw-09702.pdf http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/article?id=10.1371/journal.pgen.1003496 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1008990919682 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/the-real-story-behind-the-worlds-first-antibiotic/ The largest fungus: http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141114-the-biggest-organism-in-the-world http://openjournals.wsu.edu/index.php/pnwfungi/article/view/1075 http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/x03-065#.VxVSV5MrK9s The fastest fungus: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0003237 http://eol.org/pages/38244/details http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/TUTORIAL/GUNS/GUNBLST.html http://www.britannica.com/science/Pilobolus-fungus-genus The deadliest fungi: http://www.britannica.com/list/7-of-the-worlds-most-poisonous-mushrooms http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+7755 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3521283/ http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040402001008249 Cheesy fungi: http://phys.org/news/2015-09-life-domesticated-cheese-making-fungi.html http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bit.260180706/pdf http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/roquefort-cheese/ Boozy fungi: http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/yeast-fermentation-and-the-making-of-beer-14372813 http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/a-sip-for-the-ancestors-the-true-story-of-civilizations-stumbling-debt-to-beer-and-fungus/ https://www.wyeastlab.com/he-yeast-fundamentals.cfm

Classification and Structure of Fungi (Fungal Infections - Lesson 1)

Classification and Structure of Fungi (Fungal Infections - Lesson 1)

An overview of a practical classification scheme for pathological fungi, as well as a summary of their microscopic structure. Differences between yeast and mold are also discussed.

Introduction to Fungus

Introduction to Fungus

Class notes

What is a fungus? - Naked Science Scrapbook

What is a fungus? - Naked Science Scrapbook

Fungi are a biologically important, and often overlooked Kingdom of organisms. In this Naked Science Scrapbook we find out what a fungus actually is, how they live and how they cause and fight disease. Plus we see that many of our favourite meals wouldn't be the same without them.More videos and podcasts from http://www.thenakedscientists.com

11 Strange Fungi Explained

11 Strange Fungi Explained

You might see some of these 11 bizarre and creepy looking fungi around the world here are what they're called and if they are edible. Subscribe for new videos Monday Wednesday and Friday! 6. The Bitter Oyster Mushroom This mushroom is found in the local regions of North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia where it grows in clusters located mostly on oak, birch, and beech trees. Bitter oysters happen to be one of the manly bioluminescent mushrooms that exist and it’s only the eastern North American strain that is able to glow, unlike the Pacific strain. It’s thanks to this species of mushroom that the term foxfire was coined by the early settlers. Fun fact: This mushroom is classified as being bioremediation as it has the power to absorb the toxins from environmental pollutants and is able to break down lignin. 5. Stemonitis fusca This is a species of slime mold that isn’t actually a fungus, however, it was at one point that is was classified in the same kingdom. Sometimes they’re still grouped together as a means of convenience. These eukaryotic organisms are able to live as single cells but combine into multicellular reproductive structures. This type of slime mold can be found in small groups forming on dead wood. It’s recognized by its slender stalks that hold up the sporangia that only grows to a height of around 6 to 20 millimeters tall. There’s over 900 documented species of slime mold that exist all over the world. 4. The Blue Milk Mushroom The more common name for this edible mushroom is the indigo milk cap and it can be found in several different areas of the world including East Asia, Central America, and eastern North America, which is why they’re most often found in Chinese, Mexican, and Guatemalan food dishes. When the mushroom is cut open or broken it leaks an indigo milk or as it’s referred to “latex” and the mushroom begins to change into a green color once exposed to oxygen. This species of mushroom is definitely considered to be one of the most beautiful, yet, weird species in the world. 3. The False Morel Mushroom Also known as the brain mushroom and you can see why the false morel will definitely prove to be fatal if ingested raw and not properly prepared. A good number of people have died. False morels are actually considered as a famous delicacy in areas such as Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and in the regions of the Great Lakes of North America. In certain places in the world, it’s illegal to sell, in others, it must come with a warning label. The safety of its consumption has been recently brought into question as it’s been noted that even if properly prepared, toxins in the mushroom can still remain and quite a number of people have developed acute toxicity. So, there could very well be some long-term health effects related to this mushroom. 2. The Bleeding Tooth Fungus Hydnellum peckii is an interesting looking inedible mushroom that is definitely not something you want to try and eat. What you see in the following photo is a young bleeding tooth fungus that is secreting a red liquid. It’s not blood or anything, even though it does resemble it. It’s really just a liquid that is filled with anticoagulant properties. That means it’s capable of preventing blood clots. When the fungus ages it turns brown and looks unrecognizable compared to its youth. They’re most common in North America but are also found in other parts of the world. 1. The Amanita muscaria More commonly referred to as the fly agaric, this mushroom is very famous for its psychoactive properties. Not only that, but this mushroom is also considered to be highly poisonous, that is, if it’s eaten raw and not properly detoxified first. Careful, though, there’s no antidote but there are several methods as far as treatment goes. Under several different laws and ordinances, the Amanita muscaria is illegal in The United Kingdom, Australia, and The Netherlands. This fungus also happens to be quite famous in pop culture what with being featured in the Super Mario Bros. franchise and in the Alice and Wonderland book to name a few.

You Didn’t Know Mushrooms Could Do All This | National Geographic

You Didn’t Know Mushrooms Could Do All This | National Geographic

You probably didn't know mushrooms could be used to construct buildings and cure diseases. Mushrooms are being tested in innovative and imaginative ways to help society. Engineers, medical researchers, and designers are utilizing the natural abilities of various fungi for antibiotics, building materials, water filtration, toxic waste cleanup, pest abatement, textiles, and other purposes. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta There are now many champions of fungi. Tradd Cotter is one of the most vocal. A mycologist and microbiologist, Cotter owns Mushroom Mountain, a research facility in South Carolina that focuses on testing potential applications for fungi. Describing how to train fungi on "gladiator plates," Cotter explains that many fungi are so good at surviving that they are able to adapt in order to feed on otherwise toxic or non-biodegradable materials such as oil or plastics. The process is known as mycoremediation, taking in toxic compounds and reducing them to harmless ones. Mycoremediation has been sought after for for oil cleanups and expedited composting. What's more, the mushrooms that bloom from these cleanups are still a safe food source. Other collaborations include working with fungi to create portable, lightweight, sustainable products for disaster relief and developing countries. Mushroom bricks are being tested as a building material that uses water as an adhesive agent. The blocks have been tested for durability, flame retardancy, strength, and flexibility. In disaster relief packages, other mushrooms may be used to attract and trap disease-carrying mosquitoes. Mushroom Mountain and Clemson University are investigating medicinal uses as well—going so far as to create what could be a "pharmacy in a bag." The theory is that by harnessing certain fungi's ability to take in bacteria such as E. coli, researchers could train the fungi to sweat out metabolites that could combat an infection within 24 to 48 hours. Ideas continue to be tested, and those working with fungi are confident in the infinite possibilities for the versatile mushroom to solve modern problems. Watch: Glow-in-the-Dark Mushrooms: Nature’s Night Lights https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOM6QJCK8Lg PRODUCER/CAMERA/EDIT Gabriella Garcia-Pardo ANIMATION Jennifer Smart ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE Shanon Sanders and Getty Images MUSIC Tiny Music, Setuniman, Olive Musique, and Allegory Music SPECIAL THANKS Alex Wenchel Sound Effects from Freesound.org Users sheepfilms hans Pieguy360 kikuchiyo TiesWijnen slumbermonkey thatchee Percy Duke Slanesh kvgarlic Medical Illustration Eric Friz, VintageVectors.com You Didn’t Know Mushrooms Could Do All This | National Geographic https://youtu.be/BlcKBKJ8uro National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Cordyceps: attack of the killer fungi - Planet Earth Attenborough BBC wildlife

Cordyceps: attack of the killer fungi - Planet Earth Attenborough BBC wildlife

Want more natural history and wildlife videos? Visit the official BBC Earth channel: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthWW BBC Earth The BBC Earth YouTube channel is home to over 50 years-worth of the best animal videos from the BBC archive. With three new videos released every week there’s something for all nature loves from astounding animal behaviour to beautiful imagery. Click here to find our more: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthWW Sir David Attenborough and the Planet Earth team discover the weird world of the Cordyceps; killer fungi that invades the body of an insect to grow and diminish the insect population. Fascinating animal and wildlife video from the BBC epic natural world masterpiece 'Planet Earth'.

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