Abnormal Facies - Spot Diagnoses in Medicine

Abnormal Facies - Spot Diagnoses in Medicine

Many diagnoses are possible by just looking at the patient's face. Some examples are given below— 1. Myxedematous or Torpid Facies—Patient have expressionless face & apathetic look.Face is puffy with periorbital swelling, boggy eyelids and loss of outer 1/3 rd of the eyebrows. Xanthelasmas may be present. Skin is cool & dry. There may be malar flush. 2. Thyrotoxic face or Graves’ disease— Patient appears anxious, restless and fidgety. Unilateral or bilateral proptosis. Thyroid gland may be diffusely enlarged. 3. Cretinism—Congenital Hypothyroidism. Mental retardation results in idiotic look on face. Coarse skin with thick lips, large ears. 4. Cushingoid face— Rounded, plethoric face giving rise to moon face appearance. There may be hirsutism and acne. 5. Acromegalic face— Coarse facial features with prominent supraorbital ridges. Increased wrinkling of the forehead. Jaw is protruded forward (Prognathism). Nose, lips and ears are large. 6. Dermatomyositis - Heliotrope rash which is a purplish color or lilac rash, but may also be red. It can occur around the eyes along with swelling but also occurs on the upper chest or back what is called the "shawl" (around the neck) or "V-sign" above the breasts and may also occur on the face, upper arms, thighs, or hands. 7. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Photosensitive rash over both cheeks and bridge of the nose, popularly known as ‘Butterfly Rash’. 8. Systemic Sclerosis - kin is smooth, shiny & tight with hypopigmented and hyperpigmented areas. Nose is pinched up and tapered (beaking of nose, bird beak). Loss of wrinkling of forehead. Lips are thin, pursed with puckered skin around mouth. Mouth orifice is small (microstomia). 9. Thalassemic Facies - Expanded globular maxillae, due to bone marrow hyperexpansion into facial bones, combined with prominent epicanthal folds & frontal bossing. This facies is also called ‘Chipmunk Facies’. 10. Parkinsonian Facies - Mask like, expressionless face with absent/reduced blinking of eyes, staring & vacant look, and dribbling of saliva. Weakness of upward gaze, seborrhoea and sweatiness. 11. Myopathic Facies - Frontal baldness. Bilateral ptosis. Long, lean, triangular (Hatchet facies), sad and expressionless face with wasting of temporalis and masseter. 12. Myasthenic facies - Snarling facies’ in Myasthenia gravis is due to ptosis (usually bilateral) & drooping of corners of the mouth, and weakness of the facial muscles. There is usually frontalis overactivity to compensate for ptosis. 13. Down’s syndrome— Flat appearing face, small head, flat bridge of the nose, smaller than normal, low-set nose, small mouth which causes the tongue to stick out and to appear overly large, upward slanting eyes, epicanthal fold, rounded cheeks, small misshapen ears. 14. Turner Syndrome - Short and webbed neck, low hairline and redundant skinfold on the back of neck. Small lower jaw (micrognathia), small and fish-like mouth with low set, deformed ears. 15. Marfanoid face - Face is long, lean, elongated and narrow with small jaw leading to crowding of teeth, and high arched palate. 16. Mitral facies - Malar flush is Rosy, flushed cheeks and dilated capillaries. 17. Nephrotic face - Puffy face with periorbital swelling. 18. Sarcoidosis - Lupus pernio is found in sarcoidosis. It is a chronic raised indurated (hardened) lesion of the skin, often purplish in color. It is seen on the nose, ears, cheeks, lips, and forehead. 19. Bell's palsy - Rolling up of eye on affected side when try to close eye is the Bell’s sign. Moreover, there is loss of wrinkling on forehead, nasolabial fold on effected side. 20. Leonine face - Seen in Lepromatous leprae. Skin of the face and forehead is thick and corrugated. Multiple nodules of variable sizes and shapes involving ear lobule, face and nose. 21. Achondroplasia—Short stature. Skull appears enlarged. ................................................................... Please Visit & Subscribe Our Channel for Latest Videos: https://www.youtube.com/lastsecondmedicine Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lastsecondmedicine Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Last_Second_Med Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/lastsecondmedicine Please Leave you valued suggestion in Comments. Background Music Courtesy: TITLE: Colourful spots ARTIST: Nicolai Heidlas

Down syndrome (trisomy 21) - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, & pathology

Down syndrome (trisomy 21) - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, & pathology

What is Down syndrome (trisomy 21)? Down syndrome is a set of symptoms that arise from a genetic abnormality, in which an individual's cells have an extra copy of chromosome 21. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.

How to Understand Down Syndrome | Baby Development

How to Understand Down Syndrome | Baby Development

Watch more Newborn & Baby Development videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/506167-How-to-Understand-Down-Syndrome-Baby-Development Down syndrome is also known as trisomy 21. It's a genetic defect in the baby. Parents always want to know what is the prognosis of Down syndrome, and every Down syndrome baby has a different course. There are some common features to Down syndrome. The babies usually have wonderful personalities, and they're very warm as children. Down syndrome babies have typical facial features. They can have epicanthal folds over their eyes. They can have a large tongue. They often have a simian crease along their hands. They can have an extra wide space between their toes. Some Down syndrome babies have clinodactyly, which is a curvature of the fifth digit on each finger, and sometimes on the toes as well. Not all Down syndrome babies have the same findings. More importantly than the physical features are the heart defects. Many Down syndrome babies have congenital heart defects. The most common one is a VSD, ventricular septal defect. And another one that is very common in Down syndrome is an endocardio cushion defect. It is imperative, if you have a baby with Down syndrome, that you have a cardiology visit once a year. Babies with Down syndrome are also at increased risk for leukemias. Your pediatrician will be very well-versed in taking care of a Down syndrome baby and making sure that your baby is kept up to date as far as screenings for leukemia, heart defects, and other problems including low tone and physical therapy that the baby might need throughout their life.

Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome

ABNORMALITIES General. Hypotonia with tendency to keep mouth open and protrude the tongue, diastasis recti, hyperflexibility of joints, relatively small stature with awkward gait, increased weight in adolescence. Central Nervous System. Intellectual disability. Craniofacial. Brachycephaly; mild microcephaly with upslanting palpebral fissures; thin cranium with late closure of fontanels; hypoplasia to aplasia of frontal sinuses, short hard palate; small nose with low nasal bridge and tendency to have inner epicanthal folds. Eyes. Speckling of iris (Brushfield spots) with peripheral hypoplasia of iris; fine lens opacities by slit lamp examination (59%); refractive error, mostly myopia (70%); nystagmus (35%); strabismus (45%); blocked tear duct (20%); acquired cataracts in adults (30% to 60%).Ears. Small; overfolding of angulated upper helix; sometimes prominent; small or absentearlobes; hearing loss (66%) of conductive, mixed, or sensorineural type; fluid accumulation in middle ear (60% to 80%). Dentition. Hypoplasia, irregular placement, fewer caries than usual, periodontal disease. Neck. Short with loose folds of skin. Hands. Relatively short metacarpals and phalanges; hypoplasia of midphalanx of fifth finger (60%) with clinodactyly (50%), a single crease (40%), or both; simian crease (45%); distal position of palmar axial triradius (84%); ulnar loop dermal ridge pattern on all digits (35%). Feet. Wide gap between first and second toes, plantar crease between first and second toes, open field dermal ridge patterning in hallucal area of sole (50%). Pelvis. Hypoplasia with outward lateral flare of iliac wings and shallow acetabular angle. Cardiac. Anomaly in approximately 40%; endocardial cushion defect, ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, auricular septal defect, and aberrant subclavian artery, in decreasing order of frequency; mitral valve prolapse with or without tricuspid valve prolapse and aortic regurgitation by 20 years of age; risk for regurgitation after 18 years of age. Skin. Cutis marmorata, especially in extremities (43%); dry, hyperkeratotic skin with time (75%); infections in the perigenital area, buttocks, and thighs that begin as follicular pustules in 50% to 60% of adolescents. Hair. Fine, soft, and often sparse; straight pubic hair at adolescence.Genitalia. Relatively small penis and decreased testicular volume; primary gonadal deficiency is common and progressive from birth to adolescence and is definitely present in adults. Although rare, cases of fertility in females have been reported; no male has reproduced

Epicanthal fold - Medical Definition

Epicanthal fold - Medical Definition

https://word2speech.com/medical/ Epicanthal fold Epicanthal fold: A fold of skin that comes down across the inner angle of the eye. Epicanthal folds appear most frequently in persons with Down syndrome and some other constellations of birth defects. To the untrained eye, an epicanthal fold may look similar to the eye fold found in peoples of Asian origin, but the normal Asian eye fold is actually quite distinct, whereas an epicanthal fold is continuous with the lower edge of the upper eyelid. How to pronounce, definition of, audio dictionary, medical dictionary

Repair of medial canthal web with a skin graft

Repair of medial canthal web with a skin graft

Webs at the lateral or medial canthus are usually due to shortening of the anterior lamella. Treatment involves lengthening the skin, either using flaps or free skin grafts. In this video, the patient had a medial canthal web after a previous external DCR surgery. The scar is excised and the underlying defect is then repaired with a full thickness skin graft. A written transcript of this video is as follows: This is Richard Allen at the University of Iowa. This video demonstrates repair of a medial canthal web in a patient who had a previous external dacryocystorhinostomy. The prevision incision likely extended more superiorly than would be preferred. Various options could be considered including a combination of flaps as seen in another video. In this case, it was decided to excise the area of the vertical shortening and place a skin graft. A 15 blade is used to make an incision around the scar. Webs in general are due to shortening of tissue in the area. At the medial canthus, this can be both horizontal and vertical, but mostly vertical. Westcott scissors are used to excise the area of the scar and the skin. The resulting defect is noted which places the canthus in the correct position. A skin graft will be planned. Telfa is used to make a template of the defect. A retroauricular graft is then harvested and placed into position. The graft is sutured into position with interrupted 5-0 fast-absorbing sutures. The area of the shortening is resolved. 6-0 silk sutures are then placed at cardinal positions. Antibiotic ointment is placed over the graft followed by the bolster on top of Telfa. The bolster is fixated into position by tying the 6-0 silk sutures over it. The patient will follow-up in approximately 1 week for bolster removal and reevaluation. Currently, www.oculosurg.com is having technical difficulties. I hope to have them resolved by next week. Please contact me (Missy Gaido Allen) directly if you need access to a video of a specific surgical technique. Thank you!

Asian Blepharoplasty Double Eyelid with Medial Epicanthoplasty Live Surgery by Seattle Dr. Young

Asian Blepharoplasty Double Eyelid with Medial Epicanthoplasty Live Surgery by Seattle Dr. Young

This is a live demonstration of a Asian Double Eyelid Blepharoplasty Eyelift with a medial epicanthoplasty procedure to improve the epicanthal folds or web in the medial part of the eye. It is also a demonstration of an Asian Blepharoplasty Double Eyelid Crease Formation. Asian can lack an eyelid crease and this surgery is used to create one. Also to make the eyes look bigger, you can open up the eyes horizontally by opening up the eyes in the medial part next to the nose. This web of skin is called the epicanthal folds. Dr Young is in Bellevue, near Seattle Washington. Here are some helpful links http://www.drphilipyoung.com/medial-epicanthoplasty-for-epicanthal-folds/ http://www.drphilipyoung.com/asian-plastic-surgery/ http://www.drphilipyoung.com/asian-double-eyelid-procedure/ https://www.drphilipyoung.com/asian-plastic-surgery-before-after-photos/ Click here for our facelift page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/facelift/ Click here for our Rhinoplasty page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/rhinoplasty/ Click here for our Necklift Page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/neck-lift/ Click here for our Eyelift Page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/eyelift-blepharoplasty/ Click here for our Otoplasty Page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/ear-plastic-surgery-otoplasty/ Follow this for our Browlift Page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/brow-lift/ Click on this link for our Transgender Facial Feminization Page: https://www.drphilipyoung.com/transgender-surgery/ Music: http://www.bensound.com Legal Disclaimer Warning this Video may contain facial plastic surgery procedures which can be considered graphic and shocking. The video contents may not be suitable for all audiences and you should watch at your own risk. The content seen in this video is the property of Dr. Philip Young, MD, a board-certified Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgeon who specializes in Facial Plastic Surgery, and Aesthetic Facial Plastic Surgery, PLLC. It is for medical education purposes. The information in these videos is the opinion of the authors and is not necessarily the official opinion of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery. For Health Care Practitioners: The content is provided only for medical education purposes. The content should not necessarily be considered the standard of care. For the Public: This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. These are medical procedures performed by a medical professional and should not be performed in a non-medical setting. You should contact your own physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking it based on information from this content. Relying on information provided by this content is done at your own risk. In the event of a medical emergency, contact your physician or dial 9-1-1 immediately.

Trisomy 18 syndrome

Trisomy 18 syndrome

General. Feeble fetal activity, weak cry, altered gestational timing; one third premature, one third postmature; polyhydramnios, small placenta, single umbilical artery, growth deficiency; mean birth weight, 2340 g; hypoplasia of skeletal muscle, subcutaneous and adipose tissue; mental deficiency, hypertonicity (after neonatal period); diminished response to sound. Craniofacial. Prominent occiput, narrow bifrontal diameter; low-set, malformed auricles; short palpebral fissures; small oral opening, narrow palatal arch; micrognathia. Hands and Feet. Clenched hand, tendency for overlapping of index finger over third, fifth finger over fourth; absence of distal crease on fifth finger with or without distal creases on third and fourth fingers; low-arch dermal ridge pattern on six or more fingertips; hypoplasia of nails, especially on fifth finger and toes; short hallux, frequently dorsiflexed. Thorax. Short sternum, with reduced number of ossification centers; small nipples. Abdominal Wall. Inguinal or umbilical hernia and/ or diastasis recti. Pelvis and Hips. Small pelvis, limited hip abduction. Genitalia. Male: cryptorchidism.Skin. Redundancy, mild hirsutism of forehead and back, prominent cutis marmorata. Cardiac. Ventricular septal defect, auricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus.Craniofacial. Wide fontanels, microcephaly, hypoplasia of orbital ridges; inner epicanthal folds, ptosis of eyelid, corneal opacity, retinal folds, retinal hypopigmentation, dysplasia and areas of hemorrhage and gliosis; cleft lip, cleft palate, or both. Hands and Feet. Ulnar or radial deviation of hand, hypoplastic to absent thumb, simian crease; equinovarus, rocker-bottom feet, syndactyly of second and third toes. Thorax. Relatively broad, with or without widely spaced nipples. Genitalia. Female: hypoplasia of labia majora with prominent clitoris. Anus. Malposed or funnel-shaped anus. Cardiac. Bicuspid aortic and/or pulmonic valves, nodularity of valve leaflets, pulmonic stenosis, coarctation of aorta. Lung. Malsegmentation to absence of right lung. Diaphragm. Muscle hypoplasia with or without eventration. Abdomen. Meckel diverticulum, heterotopic pancreatic and/or splenic tissue, omphalocele. Incomplete rotation of colon. Renal. Horseshoe defect, ectopic kidney, double ureter, hydronephrosis, polycystic kidney.

ankyloblepharon

ankyloblepharon

Lids joined together at birth-ankyloblepharon is a rare abnormality. This child was born at Howrah hospital with this deformity. At the age of 15 days, the abnormality was surgically corrected by Dr. Debasish mandal.

What is TELECANTHUS? What does TELECANTHUS mean? TELECANTHUS meaning, definition & explanation

What is TELECANTHUS? What does TELECANTHUS mean? TELECANTHUS meaning, definition & explanation

What is TELECANTHUS? What does TELECANTHUS mean? TELECANTHUS meaning - TELECANTHUS pronunciation - TELECANTHUS definition - TELECANTHUS explanation - How to pronounce TELECANTHUS? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Telecanthus refers to increased distance between the medial canthi of the eyes, while the inter-pupillary distance is normal. This is in contrast to hypertelorism, where the inter-pupillary distance is increased. The distance between the inner corner of the left eye and the inner corner of the right eye, is called intercanthal distance. In most people, the intercanthal distance is equal to the distance between the inner corner and the outer corner of each eye, that is, the width of the eye. The average interpupillary distance is 60–62 millimeters (mm), which corresponds to an intercanthal distance of approximately 30–31 mm. The situation, where intercanthal distance is intensely bigger than the width of the eye, is called telecanthus (tele= Greek ???? = far, and Greek ?????? = thorn). This can be an ethnic index or an indication for hypertelorism or hypotelorism, if it is combined with abnormal relation to the interpupillary distance (A D STEAS). Traumatic Telecanthus refers to telcanthus resulting from traumatic injury to the nasal-orbital-ethmoid (NOE) complex. The diagnosis of traumatic telecanthus requires a measurement in excess of those normative values. The pathology can be either unilateral or bilateral, with the former more difficult to measure. Telecanthus is often associated with many congenital disorders. Congenital disorders such as Down syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Cri du Chat syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome often present with prominent epicanthal fold and if these folds are nasal (most commonly are) they will cause telecanthus.

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