Equal Employment Opportunity Responsibilities in Procurement

Equal Employment Opportunity Responsibilities in Procurement

Are you a contracting officer with a federal government agency? Do you handle pre-award EEO clearances? Are you responsible for ensuring bidders have Affirmative Action Programs (AAPs) in place? If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, this webinar is designed for you! Join the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), U.S. Department of Labor, for an overview of recent changes to the EEO requirements that apply to government acquisitions. OFCCP will provide information on updates to the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 (VEVRAA), Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the recently issued Executive Order 13672, prohibiting discrimination on the bases of sexual orientation and gender identity. In addition, OFCCP presenters will discuss the impact of these changes on federal government contracts and the equal opportunity clause, the pre-award clearance process, the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), government contractors’ filing of the EEO-1 Report, and the “Equal Employment Opportunity Is The Law (EEOC)” poster. For more information about OFCCP, please visit the Federal Contracting Officer Corner on OFCCP’s website.

WISE Webinar 2018-05: Ticket to Work: Working for the Federal Government

WISE Webinar 2018-05: Ticket to Work: Working for the Federal Government

Commissioner Chai Feldblum of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) joined us to discuss regulations that may help you find a job working for the federal government or a federal contractor. The presentation included information on: • Federal hiring paths for people with disabilities • How the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission can help if you experience discrimination • How a Ticket to Work service provider may help you on the path to employment Moderator: Stacey Plizga, Ticket Program Manager Presenters: Commissioner Chai Feldblum, EEOC Pamela Walker, CEO of Alliance Professional Services, LLC

EEO 1's Looming Deadline, March 31st

EEO 1's Looming Deadline, March 31st

The deadline for filing the EEO-1 report is March 31. This report monitors job patterns of women and minorities. If you are a private employer or federal contractor and meet key parameters, your report needs to be filed online at EEOC.gov. Nemeth Law Senior Attorney Nicholas Huguelet shares more details on the EEO-1 report in this quick video.

Protecting Federal Workers Under Investigation - “I Got Fired!” Show From The Spiggle Law Firm

Protecting Federal Workers Under Investigation - “I Got Fired!” Show From The Spiggle Law Firm

What public sector employees need to know about investigations and employment law. Special guest lawyer Sara Kropf, an expert in white collar crime and fraud, joins The Spiggle Law Firm to talk about the darkside of workplace investigations with the Office of Inspector General. Learn more here: https://www.spigglelaw.com/tools-resources/. The “I Got Fired!” Show, hosted by Tom Spiggle, gives real-world advice for workers who have been fired or are afraid they might be. Featuring expert employment lawyers who specialize in protecting workers, we cover unfair dismissal, discrimination, disability, litigation, and more. Subscribe here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5QvSgRoiPI-axJ2RrW8GeQ?sub_confirmation=1 for more tips on what to do when you are discriminated at work or investigated. 5:45 How to know if you’re the subject of an Office of Inspector General investigation about waste, fraud and abuse 7:18 Common misconceptions of public sector workers 8:10 Warning signs you might be under investigation 11:55 Should you call a lawyer if you’re under investigation 13:19 Biggest risk of talking to a federal agent? 14:20 How to hire a trial lawyer who protects federal employees 18:28 What are potential outcomes of an OIG investigation? 20:30 The riskiest, increasingly common way OIG investigations can become a criminal case 22:10 What happens if you talk to an OIG agent 25:35 How an employment lawyer can help you (quickly) 26:35 How investigation findings are shared and published 30:40 Who can start an investigation? 33:50 Tips on subpoenas, testimony, quitting and more 35:15 Can government contractors be investigated? The Spiggle Law Firm covers employment law and protects workers from wrongful employment practices. Since opening its doors in 2009, our employment lawyers have negotiated millions in settlements and become a trusted and respected advocate for those facing discrimination, retaliation, and harassment in the workplace, including: - Family Medical Leave Act - Pregnancy, Gender, Race, Disability and Age Discrimination - Severance, Pay and Overtime - Federal Workers and Military - Sexual Harassment - Whistleblower and Workplace Investigations A Virginia-based law firm, we represent clients across the region in Virginia, District of Columbia, Maryland, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Learn more at https://www.spigglelaw.com/ and find us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/spigglelaw Twitter: https://twitter.com/tspiggle LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-spiggle-law-firm/

ODEO EEO Complaints

ODEO EEO Complaints

ODEO EEO Complaints Introductory Video

EEOC and OFCCP Enforcement Update

EEOC and OFCCP Enforcement Update

David Cohen on Jun 20, 2017, 9:58 AM

EEOC OIT - The People Behind the Machines

EEOC OIT - The People Behind the Machines

EEOC OIT - The People Behind the Machines

Employing Federal Contractors: Basic Issues & New Regulations

Employing Federal Contractors: Basic Issues & New Regulations

An hrsimple webinar presented by Erin Schilling of Polsinelli. She breaks down VEVRA, OFCCP, federal contractor changes and some basic concerns for any employer. Also covered: executive order 11246, AAP Plan structure, hiring veterans and more.

What is EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY? What does EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY mean?

What is EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY? What does EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY mean?

What is EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY? What does EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY mean? EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY meaning - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY definition - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Equal employment opportunity is equal opportunity in employment. Examples of legislation to foster it or to protect it from eroding include the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which was established by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to assist in the protection of United States employees from discrimination. The law was the first federal law designed to protect most US employees from employment discrimination based upon that employee's (or applicant's) race, color, religion, sex, or national origin (Public Law 88-352, July 2, 1964, 78 Stat. 253, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 2000e et. seq.). Employment discrimination entails areas such as firing, hiring, promotions, transfer or wage practices and it is also illegal to discriminate in advertising, referral of job applicants, or classification. The Title is pertinent in companies affecting commerce that have fifteen or more employees. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is section 705 of the title. Equal employment opportunity was further enhanced when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Executive Order 11246 on September 24, 1965, created to prohibit federal contractors from discriminating against employees on the basis of race, sex, creed, religion, color, or national origin. Along with those five protected classes, more recent statutes have listed other traits as "protected classes," including the following: The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 has protected those aged 40 and over but does not protect those under the age of 40. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 protects individuals who possess, or are thought to possess, a wide range of disabilities, ranging from paraplegia to Down Syndrome to autism. However, it does not force an employer to employ a worker whose disability would create an "undue hardship" onto his business (for example, a paraplegic cannot work on a construction site, and a blind person cannot be a chauffeur). Similar protections have been in place for Federal employees and customers of federal agencies and contractors since 1973 under the Rehabilitation Act. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 forbids discrimination on the basis of family history and genetic information. The Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 forbids discrimination on the grounds of a worker's military history, including any effects that the battlefield might have had on the worker's psyche. Twelve states, over one hundred local governments, and the District of Columbia have passed statutes that forbid discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation; also, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act would allegedly make sexuality a protected class, but this bill has yet to pass Congress. The executive order also required contractors to implement affirmative action plans to increase the participation of minorities and women in the workplace. Pursuant to federal regulations, affirmative action plans must consist of an equal opportunity policy statement, an analysis of the current work force, identification of problem areas, the establishment of goals and timetables for increasing employment opportunities, specific action-oriented programs to address problem areas, support for community action programs, and the establishment of an internal audit and reporting system.

Cheating the Government | Government Contractor Fraud | Tony Munter

Cheating the Government | Government Contractor Fraud | Tony Munter

Visit us at: http://whistleblower-quitam-attorney.net/ Washington D.C. whistleblower lawyer Tony Munter discusses how cheating the government is unfair to businesses that play by the rules. Those that have the courage to stand up against businesses that cheat the government can be referred to as whistleblowers. Whistleblowers help reveal fraud and other illegal acts that businesses may commit to try to get out of government regulations. It may seem natural to want to stop those that take advantage of the government. However, being a whistleblower comes with significant risk. The law provides several protections for whistleblowers against powerful businesses that may seek retaliation against them. Determining who qualifies legally as a whistleblower, however, can be a complicated matter. There are a number of laws and regulations that define whistleblowers. These may be different depending on the law and may be interpreted differently by different courts. Because the laws surrounding whistleblowers can get so complicated, it is important to contact an experienced whistleblower lawyer as soon as possible to interpret the laws involved in your case. Washington D.C. whistleblower lawyer Tony Munter works hard to defend those that expose cheating businesses. These types of cases can be challenging for everyone involved. In order to be considered a whistleblower, a person must first file a whistleblower case. The first step here is to call a lawyer to discuss your case and how to move forward. In False Claims Act cases, in which a business or individual is charged with filing a false claim with the government, it must be proven that a false claim was made. These can be very time-consuming and expensive cases. Whistleblowers, attorneys, and courts must put in a lot of time and effort to determine whether a business is really at fault. In addition, laws state that whistleblowers must keep completely quiet about the case in order to protect themselves. This can be very difficult and psychologically challenging for some. It is important to hire a whistleblower lawyer that understands all of the unique challenges that come along with a false claims act. Filing a False Claims Act against a business that has been cheating the government can be a lengthy process. False Claims Acts are not simple cases, and they may involved drawn out investigations into a business’s financial activities. When a whistleblower has made the decision to report these incidents, it can be hard to wait. The right whistleblower lawyer can help explain the process and keep the whistleblower updated on their case. Knowing the process that your case is going through can help ease frustrations about the length of the case. If you are considering filing a whistleblower case, contact experienced whistleblower lawyer Tony Munter on his website, or call us at (202) 552-1777. Tony Munter Whistleblower Attorney 409 7th Street NW Suite 210 Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) 552-1777 We welcome you to subscribe to the Tony Munter Whistleblower Attorney Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcIw8mTRdECYC44howjm9GA *Please note that laws change. This information is accurate as of the date this video was published and is not to be construed as legal advice. To find out how your prospective case applies to current law give us a call today.

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