Two Minute Legal Update: Time to File 2017 EEO-1 Report

Two Minute Legal Update: Time to File 2017 EEO-1 Report

Although the proposed new reporting form was scrapped, the EEOC directed covered employers to submit the long-used EEO-1 form for 2017 no later than March 31, 2018.

EEO-1 Reports: Are You Ready?

EEO-1 Reports: Are You Ready?

Miller Johnson's Gary Chamberlin and Kelley Stoppels discuss the upcoming changes to the EEO-1 Report.

How To Comply With The New EEO-1 Reporting Changes : What You Need To Know Before 2018?

How To Comply With The New EEO-1 Reporting Changes : What You Need To Know Before 2018?

Compliance Trainings by 247Compliance https://247compliance.com To Enroll Please Visit: https://247compliance.com/webinar/understanding-the-overlap-between-fmla-ada-and-workers-compensation/ A Webinar by: U. Harold Levy Introduction On September 29, 2016, the EEOC announced approval of a revised EEO-1, starting with the 2017 report, to collect summary pay data from employers, including federal contractors and subcontractors, with 100 or more employees. Summary pay data for private employers subject to Title VII jurisdiction will go to the EEOC. Summary pay data only for federal contractors and subcontractors subject to Executive Order 11246 will go to OFCCP. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission says that the new data will improve investigations of possible pay discrimination, which remains a contributing factor to persistent wage gaps, according to the EEOC announcement. For purposes of self-assessment, employers can use published aggregated data to compare or benchmark their own data with data from other employers in their industry or geographical area. Why should you attend? Pay equity is now a central focus for both Federal and state agencies. In addition to the growing list of states with aggressive equal pay laws, the EEOC recently announced dramatic changes to the EEO-1 Report. In order for companies to be in compliance with Federal reporting regulations all employers in the private sector with 100 or more employees, and some federal contractors with 50 or more employees, must annually file the EEO-1 Report, with the Joint Reporting Committee (a joint committee consisting of the EEOC and the OFCCP) by September 30. The current EEO-1 Report requires covered private sector employers to provide workforce profiles by race, ethnicity, sex, and job category. This webinar will help employers to avoid costly and potentially damaging litigation Learning Objectives Who must file EEO-1 Report -Step-by-step basics of filing the form. Understand the race, ethnicity, job categories. How to classify managers and supervisors. Practical strategies for complying with confidentiality requirements. Practical suggestions on how to legally survey and classify your employees. What federal contractors can’t ignore. Which methods of collecting data from your workers are the most affordable and legally compliant. Collecting employee information when your organization has multiple employment locations. EEOC’s and OFCCP’s change in enforcement. What employers need to be aware of. Areas covered in the Webinar Who must file EEO-1 Report -Step-by-step basics of filing the form. Understand the race, ethnicity, job categories. Change Summary Pay Data. Change Deadline and Payroll Period. Method for Filing EEO-1 Reports. Entering Hours Worked Data. Confidential and Privacy of EEO-1 Data. Use of Summary Pay Data. Who Will Benefit? HR professionals. Financial Officers. In-House Counsel. Affirmative Action/EEO Officers. Federal Contractors.

2017 EEO-1 Survey Reporting: Do It Before EEOC or OFCCP Comes Knocking

2017 EEO-1 Survey Reporting: Do It Before EEOC or OFCCP Comes Knocking

Click here for more https://www.audiosolutionz.com/hr-compliance-employment/eeo-1-reporting.html 2017 EEO-1 Survey Reporting: Do It Before EEOC or OFCCP Comes Knocking This session, by expert speaker Susan Fahey Desmond, will prepare you for the upcoming changes and will address what you need to be doing now to ensure that you can protect your company against claims of pay discrimination. Connect with us on Twitter: -https://twitter.com/SolutionzAudio Facebook: - https://www.facebook.com/AudioSolutionz Linkedin: -http://www.linkedin.com/company/audio-solutionz Google+:- https://plus.google.com/+Audiosolutionz1/posts

Proposed Revisions to EEO-1 Reporting: The Impact to Employers

Proposed Revisions to EEO-1 Reporting: The Impact to Employers

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission proposed major revisions to EEO-1 reporting that would require the addition of employee pay data, which must be broken out by race, gender, and ethnicity. After years of research and two public comment periods, the EEOC is expected to issue final regulations in 2016, with potentially significant consequences for employers.

What Are EEOC Claims And How Do You File Them?

What Are EEOC Claims And How Do You File Them?

If you have legal questions, please visit http://www.FRPlegal.com or the Law Call Website at http://www.myfoxal.com/story/11829829/lawcall . Follow us on twitter http://www.twitter.com/frplegal or like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/frplegal No representation is made that the quality of the legal service to be performed is greater than the quality of service performed by other lawyers.

How To File A Complaint With The EEOC - U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

How To File A Complaint With The EEOC - U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to discriminate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. Most employers with at least 15 employees are covered by EEOC laws (20 employees in age discrimination cases). Most labor unions and employment agencies are also covered. The laws apply to all types of work situations, including hiring, firing, promotions, harassment, training, wages, and benefits. (Source: https://www.eeoc.gov) 1. Keep a log of every incident. 2. Notify for your manager/supervisor. If they are the people harassing you then contact their manager/supervisor. 3. Contact Human Resources 4. Make sure your conversations are documented. 5. Contact the EEOC Names, dates, phone numbers.....any information that will be relevant to your case. Once you contact the EEOC your company can not fire you or that will be considered retaliation. File your report. The EEOC will do an investigation and notify you of the outcome. DO NOT QUIT. You may be able to obtain unemployment if there was just or probable cause for you quitting. Your company must investigate any charge of harassment (sexual, verbal,etc) Your company is responsible to investigate and defuse threats made by other employees.

What is Discovery?

What is Discovery?

This is for Federal Employees pursuing the EEO and MSPB process. This video explains what happens after you receive your ROI and go before the EEOC and MSPB. This will describe the discovery process i.e. the process for collecting data and documents to use at trial.

Lawyer - Employee Filed a Complaint with the EEOC Alleging Discrimination in White Plains, NY

Lawyer - Employee Filed a Complaint with the EEOC Alleging Discrimination in White Plains, NY

This Informational Law Video has Been Brought to You by Kim Patricia Berg an Experienced White Plains, NY Attorney Specializing in Employment Law, Discrimination, Retaliation, Civil Rights, and Commercial Litigation. (http://gouldberglaw.com/attorneys/new-york-attorney-kim-patricia-berg/) Gould & Berg LLP focuses its practice in the areas of employment law, civil rights and commercial litigation. Our founding partners, Jane Bilus Gould and Kim Patricia Berg, assist clients in Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, Rockland, and Orange Counties, New York City and Long Island. We recognize that this may be an emotionally and economically challenging time for you. No two clients have the exact same concerns. We consider each client’s circumstances and provide our opinion on how to best resolve your situation for the best possible outcome. Give us a call. We will talk with you about your concerns and help determine a strategy for your particular needs. 914-397-1050 (http://gouldberglaw.com/)

How does the EEOC prove discrimination?

How does the EEOC prove discrimination?

How does the EEOC prove discrimination? | Zuckerman Law | Eric Bachman | https://www.zuckermanlaw.com/ | https://www.glassceilingdiscriminationlawyer.com/ | (202) 769-1681 | (202) 262-8959 The EEOC will take a look at the complaint that you file with them and see what information you’ve got to prove that you were discriminated against at work. They will then share that information and that complaint with your employer who will give their own response. If the EEOC believes that there are reasonable grounds that you were discriminated against at work, they will conduct a further investigation. That’s going to involve interviewing witnesses, seeing how the company has treated similarly situated employees and determining whether or not the company can prove its defense to your claim of discrimination. Ultimately, the EEOC needs to be able to prove by a preponderance of evidence, meaning at least 51% probability, that you suffered employment discrimination at your worksite.

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