Search for Japan Radiation Leak Turns Desperate

Search for Japan Radiation Leak Turns Desperate

The operators of Japan's stricken nuclear power plant have grown increasingly desperate in their search for a serious radiation leak. They tried dying highly radioactive water with bath salts Monday to help them trace it. (April 4)

Nuclear radiation found in Japan's food

Nuclear radiation found in Japan's food

Bob Schieffer spoke with Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) of the Energy and Commerce Committee on the viability of nuclear power in the United States after safety concerns arose from the meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Japan Dead Zone: Video of search for bodies in Fukushima radiation shadow

Japan Dead Zone: Video of search for bodies in Fukushima radiation shadow

Japan's government has ordered the operator of the Fukushima nuclear plant to pay some $12,000 to each household forced to evacuate because of radiation leaks. It is estimated the compensation bill could end up topping 25 billion. However, the country's leadership has come in for its own criticism, from those still living in shelters a month on from the quake. They say helps been too little, too late. It comes as emergency response crews are finally carrying out intensive searches for tsunami victims near the nuclear plant, delayed over radiation fears. RT on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RTnews RT on Twitter: http://twitter.com/RT_com

The Most Radioactive Places on Earth

The Most Radioactive Places on Earth

Who on Earth is exposed to the most ionizing radiation? Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe I'm filming a documentary for TV about how Uranium and radioactivity have shaped the modern world. It will be broadcast in mid-2015, details to come. The filming took me to the most radioactive places on Earth (and some places, which surprisingly aren't as radioactive as you'd think). Chernobyl and Fukushima were incredible to see as they present post-apocalyptic landscapes. I also visited nuclear power plants, research reactors, Marie Curie's institute, Einstein's apartment, nuclear medicine areas of hospitals, uranium mines, nuclear bomb sites, and interviewed numerous experts. Notes about measuring radiation: Sieverts are a measure of 'effective dose' - that means they measure the biological impact of the energy transferred to tissues from radiation. Obviously I owe a debt to the fantastic chart made by xkcd, which inspired my visual approach to this video. https://xkcd.com/radiation/ DOSES MAY VARY The level of radiation varies widely around the world depending mainly on altitude and geology (excluding nuclear accidents). Estimates of particular doses also vary. All numbers reported in this video should be taken as order of magnitude only. The most contentious claim may be that smokers receive the highest dose of ionizing radiation. This is not a whole body dose, but a dose to the lungs as specified in the video. References are here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_effects_of_tobacco http://www.rmeswi.com/36.html Special thanks to: Physics Girl: https://www.youtube.com/physicswoman MinutePhysics: https://www.youtube.com/minutephysics Natalie Tran: https://www.youtube.com/communitychannel Bionerd23: https://www.youtube.com/bionerd23 Nigel and Helen for feedback on earlier drafts of this video. Music is "Stale Mate"

Japan nuclear crisis 'breakthrough'

Japan nuclear crisis 'breakthrough'

Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe The operator of Japan's damaged Fukushima Daichii nuclear power plant says it has stopped the leak of highly radioactive water into the sea. Problems at the plant are far from over, however, as the reactors still need to be kept from overheating. While Japan's Crown Prince and Princess have paid a visit to those displaced by the massive earthquake and tsunami that struck the country, Naoto Kan, the prime minister, continues to come under increasing pressure to do more for evacuees. Al Jazeera's Marga Ortigas reports from Misuzawa, Japan. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts

A look at nuclear power: do risks outweigh benefits?

A look at nuclear power: do risks outweigh benefits?

Mike Walter is joined by Arjun Makhijani of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research to talk about the lasting effects of Japan's Fukushima nuclear disaster and the benefits and risks of the global nuclear energy industry.

Nuclear Safe? 3 Mile Island, Fukushima, Chernobyl just 'bumps along the way'

Nuclear Safe? 3 Mile Island, Fukushima, Chernobyl just 'bumps along the way'

Events at Fukushima should not be called a nuclear disaster, says John Ritch, Director General of the World Nuclear Association. He explains to RT why he thinks nuclear energy is still one of the safest sources of power - and getting safer. ­The history of nuclear energy goes back more than half of a century, to when the first experimental reactors were built in the 1950s. The technology of nuclear energy production is still new. Despite several bumps in its development, including the Chernobyl disaster in Ukraine in 1985 and this year's accident at Fukushima Daiichi in Japan, enormous changes have taken place in this period of time. "The remarkable thing about this technology is how essentially safe if has been," said nuclear energy expert John Ritch. "It does not produce emissions into the global atmosphere. And it has only on very rare occasions harmed anyone. In the meantime, we have had millions of fatalities from the extraction of fossil fuels from the surface of the earth and the health consequences of carbon emissions." The question of waste is one of the most fundamentally misunderstood aspects of nuclear energy, argues Ritch. The expert says that waste is the greatest comparative asset of nuclear power. Coal, natural gas or oil production uses the global public atmosphere as an enormous waste dump at the stage of both burning and transmitting - such as when gas, for instance, leaks from pipes. "Right now we are emitting carbon dioxide at the rate of 30 billion tons per year, which is 800 tons per second, into the planetary atmosphere," said Ritch. "Nuclear energy is producing a considerable portion of the world's electricity - one sixth, while producing an amount of radioactive waste that is equivalent to the size of the fuel." The waste becomes highly radioactive and must be safely stored. The wonder of nuclear energy, continues the expert, is that it can be managed. Nuclear waste can be safely stored in the immediate term, right after it comes out of the reactor, and eventually be put into long term storage containers. The containers are then placed back into the earth in geological depositories that are carefully selected. In the end, it is no ultimate harm either to people, or the environment. Even when we talk of the Fukushima disaster, we must note that the 24,000 people who died as a result of March's tragic events were killed by the earthquake and tsunami. But the media keeps coming up with the "nuclear disaster" hype, while there has not been a single case of a radiation fatality there, Ritch pointed out. This worse-case nuclear event has inflicted relatively little damage."The Japanese made a mistake. The fundamental mistake they made was deciding that the worst tsunami they might encounter would come at a certain height. They misjudged. And the result was that they did not have waterproof backup cooling systems," said Ritch. RT on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RTnews RT on Twitter: http://twitter.com/RT_com

The Soviet Union's Secret Nuclear Disaster

The Soviet Union's Secret Nuclear Disaster

» Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Alexander the Great died over 2,000 years, yet Greece and Macedonia are still fighting over his birthplace. It's just one of many issues dividing the two countries. So, why do they hate each other? Learn More: The Macedonian-Greek Conflict http://www.historyofmacedonia.org/MacedonianGreekConflict/conflict.html "The Macedonian-Greek conflict is a very complex issue. " Macedonian PM: Greece is avoiding talks over name dispute http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/14/business/macedonia-prime-minister-greece/index.html "Macedonia is "frustrated" by Greece's efforts to block its European Union membership over a longstanding identity dispute, the country's Prime Minister has said." Macedonian http://aboutworldlanguages.com/macedonian "Macedonian ( ?a?e?o?c?? ja???, makedonski jazik) belongs to the South Slavic group of the Slavic branch of Indo-European language family." Feud Between Greece, Macedonia Continues Over Claim to Alexander the Great http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/07/27/AR2009072702653.html "Alexander the Great died more than 2,300 years ago. But his cult of personality is just starting to grip this tiny Balkan country." Watch More: Why Greece And Turkey Are Fighting Over Cyprus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNFrirHgRQY&list=UUgRvm1yLFoaQKhmaTqXk9SA _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

Nuclear Energy Around the World | Jay Lehr

Nuclear Energy Around the World | Jay Lehr

Lecture presented by Howard Hayden, Ph.D. at the 28th Annual Meeting of the Doctors for Disaster Preparedness held in Orlando, Florida; June 12-13, 2010. Official website of Doctors for Disaster Preparedness: http://www.ddponline.org DISCLAIMER: Doctors for Disaster Preparedness has given permission under the Creative Commons license that this media presentation can be publicly reposted as long as the proper credit is given to DDP and other guidelines are followed. More info at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ This YouTube channel is in no way endorsed by or affiliated with Doctors for Disaster Preparedness, any of its lecturers or staff members. * * * * * Links to informative news articles on nuclear power and the "energy crises": Another Look at Nuclear Energy Nuclear energy is on the go, helping countries in Europe and other parts of the world solve their energy woes economically and safely. Will America get back on board? http://tinyurl.com/6w22kq6 Myths About Nuclear Energy http://tinyurl.com/6r7yczn Fukushima: Just How Dangerous is Radiation? The situation in Japan is tragic: an earthquake, a tsunami, death, homelessness, and carnage. The grimness is exacerbated by worries about radiation. But should it be? http://tinyurl.com/7zuuhqu The Effects of Low-dose Radiation The Japanese are not alone in being exposed to low-dose radiation; everyone is exposed to radiation daily, emanating from our food, buildings, etc. And that's good news! http://tinyurl.com/73pfmtp Rethinking Nuclear Power With blackouts, power shortages, and rate hikes becoming more common, now is the time for America to reexamine the promise of nuclear energy. http://tinyurl.com/7ux344e Nuclear Waste: Not a Problem Unbeknownst to most people, the bulk of nuclear waste is recyclable, and the remainder can be safely stored and presents little danger to anyone. http://tinyurl.com/7px6d29 The "Other" Renewables Environmentalists often refer to wind, solar, and "other renewable sources" of energy. What are these "other sources"? How can they contribute to our energy future? http://tinyurl.com/7hhdy8v Energy's Future The world need never run out of energy. In fact, technology and private enterprise are poised to bring us an abundance of energy—if government will just get out of the way http://tinyurl.com/6pmhj23 Energy for America We can achieve energy independence for the 21st century without destroying the environment. There's no need to de-industrialize or sacrifice our standard of living. http://tinyurl.com/7sagz2d Losing America's Livelihood The U.S. is headed for Third World status unless we change government policies that are driving U.S. businesses offshore, destroying jobs and putting entrepreneurs out of business. http://tinyurl.com/7nvr33w Stifling America's Energy Production http://tinyurl.com/7nvcgmf Building the Post-Kyoto Future The new U.S.-Asian pact on global warming has more to do with transferring technology to China than with saving the planet from greenhouse gases. http://tinyurl.com/6wdxne6 The New Fuel Crisis Hurricanes Katrina and Rita have exposed our nation's vulnerability to disruptions in fuel supply. Weaknesses in the system are due to unnecessary regulations and bureaucracy. http://tinyurl.com/c5tpxk3 Race for Fuel China's growing thirst for fuel has led the Communist country to search aggressively for oil outside its borders. That search may sow the seeds of conflict with the West. http://tinyurl.com/cqm2rlg Free Market vs. Price Controls As gas prices hit record highs, calls are inevitable for government to remedy the "problem" through price controls— -- though that solution hasn't worked in the past. http://tinyurl.com/7dr9njs How to Create an Energy Crisis http://tinyurl.com/75m2sr3 Power Crisis...or Power Grab? http://tinyurl.com/6mlbaow Freedom's Frontier From the ocean's depths to outer space, private entrepreneurs have pioneered world-changing technologies. What more could be done if government got out of the way? http://tinyurl.com/7cyuvhs The "Geek Gap" The erosion of America's manufacturing base is undermining our research and development capacity—and, unless reversed, will lead to a shortage of hi-tech engineers. http://tinyurl.com/7xv7a6y Science, Politics and Death Environmental extremism kills. Millions die annually because of restrictions on DDT, and imposing the "Kyoto" regulations would kill many more. http://tinyurl.com/6v53zye The Fruits of Eco-Extremism http://tinyurl.com/6ogcped Reheating the "Global Warming" Myth http://tinyurl.com/7478ryo Green Fairy Tales http://tinyurl.com/75dlhye Rethinking Green http://tinyurl.com/czu7owj Environmental Stewardship http://tinyurl.com/bo6mybf Behind the Environmental Lobby It may seem stranger than fiction, but it's a documentable fact: the eco-socialist movement is financed by the super-rich as part of a comprehensive agenda for global control. http://tinyurl.com/clprr3r

Fukushima Children Tested for Thyroid Cancer Risk

Fukushima Children Tested for Thyroid Cancer Risk

This is the VOA Special English Health Report, , from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish Japanese doctors have begun examining three hundred sixty thousand children in Fukushima Prefecture. The goal is to learn the extent to which radiation may increase their risk of thyroid cancer. Children who lived closest to the Fukushima-1 Nuclear Power Station were among the first to be tested. The earthquake and tsunami that struck northeastern Japan in March left twenty thousand people dead or missing. So far no one has died from radiation exposure. But tens of thousands remain displaced from a twenty-kilometer area around the disabled power plant. Officials say the thyroid tests will be done every two years until the children reach the age of twenty. After that, tests will be done every five years. Most cancers of the thyroid gland can be treated if found early. Some people in Tokyo and other cities are measuring radiation levels themselves. They worry about a possible risk from Fukushima. Recently, a private laboratory confirmed the presence of increased levels of radioactive cesium in some dirt at Tokyo's Edogawa ballpark. The area is nearly two hundred fifty kilometers from the reactors. Two mothers at the ballpark expressed surprise when told about the radioactive hot spot. The women said they had heard many general reports about radiation since the disaster in March. They felt they could not be overly concerned about those reports or they would not be able to go on with their daily lives. Private citizens found abnormal levels of radiation in the air on the path to a Tokyo school. However, government officials said the cause was under the floor of a nearby house: old bottles containing radium powder. Radium was used in the past to make watch and clock faces glow in the dark.The International Atomic Energy Agency said in October that Japan must avoid becoming too "conservative" in its clean-up efforts. Japanese officials have ordered an increase in radiation testing, but they say hot spots outside Fukushima are not a cause for worry. They say no one spends enough time at the sites to get enough radiation to cause harm. They also say the small dosimeters that some private citizens use to measure radiation can give a wrong reading.For VOA Special English, I'm Alex Villarreal. Our programs are a way for people to read, listen and learn American English and much more. You can download transcripts and MP3s of our stories at voaspecialenglish.com. (Adapted from a radio program broadcast 19Oct2011)

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