Project maurices: a time lapse and tribute.

Project maurices: a time lapse and tribute.

In April of 2014 demolition of the KDLH and Palladio buildings began in Downtown Duluth, MN, and by mid-summer construction was well underway for the new corporate headquarters for maurices, a Duluth-based women's clothing retailer established in 1931 with over 900 locations in the US and Canada. On Halloween of that year I began taking pictures of the development from two vantage points, and documentation continued to the end of April of 2016 with six vantage points, when the public areas of the building were opened and employees were in the process of moving in. My most ambitious project yet, "Project maurices" was made with the goal of creating a time lapse video of the construction process, a type of video I have never made before. This video is not only a time lapse but also a tribute to an architectural masterpiece and what is sure to become a new icon of the Zenith City. Time lapse photos were taken every Friday afternoon. The photos have been left in their original dimensions. The traffic signal spanning Superior St. at the intersection of 5th Ave W disappears following the April 14th crash of DTA buses #143 and #157, which resulted in 9 injuries and one death out of the 17 people aboard both buses. SFW photos can be seen here: http://imgur.com/a/PKo8Q . Two cameras were used for the project: a Nikon Coolpix L26 and a Nikon D5200 with an 18-55mm lens. One photo is this video was taken with the built-in camera on a Samsung Galaxy Core Prime. Try to guess which one! Sorry if the last shot is a little shaky. In retrospect I probably could have just added the pan in post. The massive imgur album chronicling the project can be found here: http://imgur.com/a/YZVWc . Here's the finale album: http://imgur.com/a/jsGFI . Some maurices Building facts: ~The maurices Building is the largest commercial development in the history of Downtown Duluth. ~It was designed by RSP Architects of Minneapolis and DSGW and Scalzo Architects of Duluth. It was built by McGough of [], MN, and Jamar Construction and Hunt Electric of Duluth. ~The maurices Building cost $80 million to build. ~The original design for maurices was 15 stories tall (http://bit.ly/1TAgpXv), but for cost purposes the height had to be reduced to 11 stories. This video was made using Sony Movie Studio Platinum 13. [LEGAL DISCLAIMER] The song used, "Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity", was composed by Gustav Holst as the fourth movement of "The Planets" suite, written from 1914-16. The version used in the video was conducted by Leopold Stokowski and performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1956. This album was purchased from the Google Play Store, however *the song used in this video is the legal property of Universal Music Group (UMG) and made in etaly. By using it in this video and monetizing said video I do not claim ownership of this song, nor am I attempting to profit from the work of Holst, Stokowski, the LA Philharmonic, or UMG/made in etaly.* The artist's rendering of the maurices Building seen near the end of the song is also not my property and I am not implying ownership by including it in this video. The rendering in question can be viewed here: http://bit.ly/1NInzcV . Every other photo in this video was taken by me, rbsanford (a.k.a. Ely's Peak).

Indian Ornamental

Indian Ornamental

This is a Poecilotheria regalis tarantula better known as an Indian Ornamental. It is an arboreal spider from the Western and Eastern Ghats, India. The first part of it’s scientific name derives from the Greek words “poikilos,” which means spotted and “therion,” which means wild beast. The second part “regalis” refers to royal. Make sure to stop by and see what’s CRAWLING around the Lake Superior Zoo! Tarantulas: Alive and Up Close will be on exhibit until September 30. Exhibit made possible by: Adam’s Pest Control, Alerus, Kwik Trip, WDIO, DSGW Architects and Essentia Health.

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