HIPAA Privacy Regulations under Designated Record Set (DRS)

HIPAA Privacy Regulations under Designated Record Set (DRS)

Click here for more Information: http://www.audioeducator.com/healthcare-compliance-and-hipaa/hipaa-designated-record-set-11-03-2015.html HIPAA Privacy Regulations under Designated Record Set (DRS) Presented By:Jim Sheldon-Dean Know the Best Practices for Documentation of Medical Necessity, Critical Care and Other Timed Services! More Videos: - http://www.youtube.com/user/audioeducator2 You can also connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn and get the most updated news and views, expert advice and tips to help resolve your coding, billing & compliance dilemmas quickly and accurately. Connect with us on Twitter: - https://twitter.com/audioeducator Facebook: - https://www.facebook.com/pages/AudioEducator/244912592201260 LinkedIn: - http://www.linkedin.com/company/audio-educator Google+: - https://plus.google.com/102668946943256059069/posts

The Legal Health Record with Mary Beth Haugen, RHIA, MS

The Legal Health Record with Mary Beth Haugen, RHIA, MS

In this interview, we sit down with Mary Beth Haugen, founder and CEO of Haugen Consulting Group, about the intricacies and challenges of the legal health record and how it's been impacted by EHR and other healthcare technology. Plus, we give HIM leaders some firepower on how to convince hospital leadership that defining the legal health record is important for every healthcare organization. Find more great videos at http://www.ehrvideos.com

Data Governance And Best Practices To Building A Complete Legal Health Record

Data Governance And Best Practices To Building A Complete Legal Health Record

‘Designated Survivor’ Sets A TV Record

‘Designated Survivor’ Sets A TV Record

‘Designated Survivor’ Debut Breaks TV’s All-Time Record for Delayed Viewing Bump Kiefer Sutherland ABC drama adds 7.7 million viewers in week after premiere, kicking a 2015 “Big Bang Theory” off the podium The ABC drama just broke the Nielsen record for TV’s largest-ever total viewer Live + 7 Day increase for any single telecast on any network. Trump-Clinton Debate's 84 Million Total Viewers Breaks Carter-Reagan Ratings Record (Updated) Read original story ‘Designated Survivor’ Debut Breaks TV’s All-Time Record for Delayed Viewing Bump At TheWrap http://www.sfgate.com/entertainment/the-wrap/article/Designated-Survivor-Debut-Breaks-TV-s-9513212.php http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit Entertainment using http://wochit.com

Maintaining Effective Health Information Privacy and Security Part 3 of 3

Maintaining Effective Health Information Privacy and Security Part 3 of 3

Part 3 of 3 parts of a Protected Health Information-Electronic Health Records Seminar presented on August 22, 2013, at the Ashland County Service Center, Ashland, Ohio. From an 8-29-2013 email: With regard to a Covered Entity (CE) communicating with patients via email, here is language outlining OCR's perspective: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/faq/health_information_technology/570.html . Note that reasonable safeguards must be in place. I [Mr. Brescia] mentioned the CE could obtain a signed consent from the patient acknowledging that the patient is aware of the potential risks associated with communicating PHI via unencrypted email and agrees to receive information from the CE via email. While this type of consent isn't required per the Frequently Asked Questions, it may be a practice the CE chooses to use so the CE and patient clearly understand how information may be communicated. With regard to a CE disclosing the Protected Health Information (PHI) of its patient when some or all of the PHI it would disclose was created by another CE, the Privacy Rule only requires CE's to make two types of disclosures: 1) to the individual when the individual requests his/her PHI under 45 C.F.R. § 164.524 (Right to Access) or § 164.528 (Right to an Accounting); and 2) to the Secretary of HHS (i.e. OCR). All other disclosures under the Privacy Rule are permissive, so, for example, the Privacy Rule does not require a CE to disclose PHI to another CE, though in certain instances such a disclosure is permitted. (*Note that under the Omnibus Rule changes, a CE may be required to send an individual's PHI to another CE pursuant to the individual's § 164.524 access request.) However, if an individual requests access to his/her PHI from a CE and the CE has PHI for the individual in its designated record set from another CE, the CE which received the access request must provide a copy of the PHI in its designated record set, including the PHI the CE received from another CE, to the individual with limited exceptions (see 45 C.F.R. § 164.524(a)). Note that the definitions of "protected health information" under 45 C.F.R. § 160.103 and of "designated record set" under 45 C.F.R. § 164.501 do not treat differently information a CE receives versus information a CE creates.

Maintaining Effective Health Information Privacy and Security Part 2 of 3

Maintaining Effective Health Information Privacy and Security Part 2 of 3

Part 2 of 3 parts of a Protected Health Information-Electronic Health Records Seminar presented on August 22, 2013, at the Ashland County Service Center, Ashland, Ohio. From an 8-29-2013 email: With regard to a Covered Entity (CE) communicating with patients via email, here is language outlining OCR's perspective: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/faq/health_information_technology/570.html . Note that reasonable safeguards must be in place. I [Mr. Brescia] mentioned the CE could obtain a signed consent from the patient acknowledging that the patient is aware of the potential risks associated with communicating PHI via unencrypted email and agrees to receive information from the CE via email. While this type of consent isn't required per the Frequently Asked Questions, it may be a practice the CE chooses to use so the CE and patient clearly understand how information may be communicated. With regard to a CE disclosing the Protected Health Information (PHI) of its patient when some or all of the PHI it would disclose was created by another CE, the Privacy Rule only requires CE's to make two types of disclosures: 1) to the individual when the individual requests his/her PHI under 45 C.F.R. § 164.524 (Right to Access) or § 164.528 (Right to an Accounting); and 2) to the Secretary of HHS (i.e. OCR). All other disclosures under the Privacy Rule are permissive, so, for example, the Privacy Rule does not require a CE to disclose PHI to another CE, though in certain instances such a disclosure is permitted. (*Note that under the Omnibus Rule changes, a CE may be required to send an individual's PHI to another CE pursuant to the individual's § 164.524 access request.) However, if an individual requests access to his/her PHI from a CE and the CE has PHI for the individual in its designated record set from another CE, the CE which received the access request must provide a copy of the PHI in its designated record set, including the PHI the CE received from another CE, to the individual with limited exceptions (see 45 C.F.R. § 164.524(a)). Note that the definitions of "protected health information" under 45 C.F.R. § 160.103 and of "designated record set" under 45 C.F.R. § 164.501 do not treat differently information a CE receives versus information a CE creates.

Jessie Graff’s Record-Breaking Run - American Ninja Warrior: USA vs. The World

Jessie Graff’s Record-Breaking Run - American Ninja Warrior: USA vs. The World

Jessie Graff becomes the first woman to complete Stage 2. » Subscribe for More: http://bit.ly/NBCNinjaWarrior » Watch Full Episodes Free: http://www.nbc.com/american-ninja-warrior/episodes NBC NINJA WARRIOR ON SOCIAL: Like NBC Ninja Warrior on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ninjawarrior/ Follow NBC Ninja Warrior on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ninjawarrior Follow NBC Ninja Warrior on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ninjawarrior/ In season 9, American Ninja Warrior follows hundreds of competitors as they test their skills on new obstacles in an attempt to join Isaac Caldiero as just the second person ever to win the $1 million grand prize. NBC ON SOCIAL: NBC YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/ NBC Pinterest: http://Pinterest.com/NBCtv/ NBC Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NBC NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbc Find American Ninja Warrior trailers, full episode highlights, previews, promos, clips, and digital exclusives here. ABOUT AMERICAN NINJA WARRIOR The action-packed series follows competitors as they tackle a series of challenging obstacle courses in both city qualifying and city finals rounds across the country. Those that successfully complete the finals course in their designated region move on to the national finals round in Las Vegas, where they face a stunning four-stage course modeled after the famed Mt. Midoriyama course in Japan. The winner takes home a grand prize of $1 million. American Ninja Warrior enjoyed an unbelievable seventh season, which saw its first ever $1 million grand prize winner when Isaac Caldiero conquered Stage 4 of Mt. Midoriyama in 26.14 seconds. Jessie Graff’s Record-Breaking Run - American Ninja Warrior: USA vs. The World https://youtu.be/arxgcrtEZ0w American Ninja Warrior https://www.youtube.com/AmericanNinjaWarrior

Managing Government Records Directive: General Overview - "the 5,000 Foot Level"

Managing Government Records Directive: General Overview - "the 5,000 Foot Level"

Preston Huff, Head of the Project Management Office (PMO) in the Office of the Chief Records Officer, provides a high level overview of the goals set forth in the Managing Government Records Directive which was jointly issued by OMB and NARA last August. The stated objectives of the Directive are to transition the Federal Government from an analog environment to a modern, electronic record keeping system by the end of the decade to ensure transparency, efficiency and accountability. Also the Directive aims to provide a foundation to ensure agencies can demonstrate compliance with Federal records management statutes and regulations. Accessibility: This video is fully captioned for audio accessibility. For visual accessibility, a detailed text description of the video's visual presentation suitable for screen readers is available here: http://go.usa.gov/2tQF

Nix v. Hedden

Nix v. Hedden

Want a specific SCOTUS case covered? Your idea gets picked when you donate on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iammrbeat Here's what Mr. Beat has to say about tomatoes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUnvmteAxKo Mr. Beat on Twitter: https://twitter.com/beatmastermatt In episode 5 of Supreme Court Briefs, Mr. Beat looks at that one time the Supreme Court heard arguments about whether tomatoes were fruits or vegetables. No joke. For the record, Mr. Beat hates tomatoes. John Nix was one of the most successful sellers of produce in the city. His company was among the first to ship fruits and vegetables from warmer climates like Bermuda and Florida to New York. However, he became upset after hearing about a new law passed by Congress. The law, called the Tariff of 1883 (Congress has never been that good at naming laws by the way), required a tax to be paid on imported vegetables. As it turns out, that meant that Nix’s tomatoes that he imported would be taxed, even though he and his buddies all thought a tomato was clearly a fruit, not a vegetable. Fruits were exempt from the law. Four years later, Nix and his family finally decided to take action in federal court. They sued Edward Hedden, the Collector of the Port of New York, to get back the money they had been paying on tomatoes. Now, just so we are clear, tomatoes are fruits. In my opinion, horrible, disgusting...fruits, but nonetheless they are fruits. However, most people didn’t know that, and the definition was different in terms of trade and commerce. At the trial, Nix and his lawyers read the dictionary definitions of both “fruit” and “vegetable,” and witnesses even testified about their definitions. On May 14, 1889, the federal judge went with Heddon, arguing that the public tends to think that tomatoes are a vegetable, so therefore it should be considered a vegetable under the Tariff Act of 1883. John Nix and his family appealed, and the Supreme Court heard the case in April 1893. The lawyers on both sides made pretty good use of dictionaries. The defense team responded to the tomato definitions with definitions of the words pea, eggplant, cucumber, squash, and pepper. In response to that, Nix’s team read in evidence the definitions of potato, turnip, parsnip, cauliflower, cabbage, carrot, and bean. So basically the lawyers went back and forth reading definitions for awhile. It became an all-out dictionary war. Just like the federal judge, the Court ruled unanimously in favor of Heddon. It argued that tomatoes must be classified under the customs regulations as a vegetable, based on how they are used and popularly perceived. Justice Horace Gray didn’t deny that, scientifically speaking, a tomato was a fruit. However, he argued that when words have acquired no special meaning in trade or commerce, the ordinary meaning must be applied by the court. Therefore, he claimed dictionaries can’t be used as evidence, but merely as aids to help add context to the case. Yeah, take that, you stupid dictionaries! Nix v. Hedden set a precedent for court interpretation of common meanings, especially dictionary definitions. It also kind reinforced the false belief that tomatoes are vegetables. But the truth is overrated, right? In 2005, the New Jersey state legislature designated the tomato as the official state vegetable. Their justification? Nix v. Hedden.

Your Medical Documentation Matters

Your Medical Documentation Matters

Medical documentation affects services, billing, and improper payments. This presentation is designed to serve as guidance for the medical professionals in the business of helping their patients while complying with Federal and State laws. We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: http://newmedia.hhs.gov/standards/comment_policy.html As well, please view the HHS Privacy Policy: http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html

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