Simple word memory test may point to early signs of dementia - Dr Davide Bruno

Simple word memory test may point to early signs of dementia - Dr Davide Bruno

Simple word memory test may point to early signs of dementia - Dr Davide Bruno, Lecturer in Psychology

dementia Screening test

dementia Screening test

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How to Test for Dementia | The MMSE Test | Dementia Exams and Tests | Tests for Diagnosing Dementia

How to Test for Dementia | The MMSE Test | Dementia Exams and Tests | Tests for Diagnosing Dementia

=================================================== PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHvQAZwnttxiDiqE3Xpi-eA?sub_confirmation=1 =================================================== How to Test for Dementia Dementia is a common, very debilitating disease, and it can sometimes be difficult to diagnose. There is no surefire way to test it at home, and a doctor's visit is highly recommended if you suspect symptoms. A friend or family member can administer the Mini-Mental State Exam for a general idea of cognitive function, but a doctor can make best use of the results. Method 1 : Preparing for a Doctor's Visit 1.Make an appointment with a doctor. The other sections on this page contain tests which you can take at home. 2.Prepare your medical history. Some drugs, medical conditions, and family history (indicating genetic problems) can put you at higher risk of dementia. Others mimic some symptoms of dementia, such as memory loss 3.Take a physical exam. Since dementia can be caused by reduced blood flow to the brain, the physical checkup should include a blood pressure reading, taking your pulse, and a temperature measurement. 4.Take a cognitive exam. There are many types of mental exams used to test for dementia, some of which are included in this article. 5.Undergo lab tests if necessary. If your doctor does not request blood samples or other lab tests, you might want to ask about thyroid hormone tests and vitamin B12 tests 6.Ask about brain scans. If you are showing some symptoms but the cause is not clear, the doctor may recommend a brain scan to investigate possibilities besides dementia. CT scans, MRI scans, and EEG tests are the most common types of scans used to help diagnose dementia-like symptoms 7.Ask about genetic testing. Genetic testing is controversial, as even a gene linked to increased risk of dementia does not necessarily mean you will be affected. Method 2 : Taking a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) 1.Understand that this cannot be used as the only method of diagnosis. The Alzheimer's Association does not recommend using home tests instead of a doctor's visit. 2.Understand how to take the test. The person who has possible dementia-like symptoms just needs to listen to instructions. 3.Test orientation to time (5 points). Ask the person suspected of dementia the following questions, one at a time, in order. Score one point for each correct answer. 4.Test orientation to place (5 points). Ask where the person is currently located, in five separate questions. 5.Test registration (3 points). Name three simple objects (for example, "table, car, house"), and ask the person to repeat them immediately after you. 6.Test attention (5 points). Spell the word WORLD ("W-O-R-L-D"). Then ask the test-taker to spell the word WORLD backwards. Score 5 points if he succeeds within 30 seconds, and 0 points if he does not. 7.est recall (3 points). Ask the person to repeat the three words you told him to memorize earlier. Score one point per word remembered. 8.Test language (2 points). Point to a pencil, and ask "What is this called?" Point to a wristwatch, and repeat the question. Score one point per correct answer. How to Test for Dementia. How to Test for Dementia | The MMSE Test | Dementia Exams and Tests | Tests for Diagnosing Dementia #dementia test online #dementia quiz #dementia test 30 questions #mmse test #mmse test online #sage test #alzheimer's test online #sage test for alzheimer's =================================================== Google Plus Profile : Google Plus Profile : https://plus.google.com/u/0/111392267500158217425 =================================================== +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Our Blog Url : http://tubermentvideos.blogspot.com/ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dementia Test Online Memory Healer Program

Dementia Test Online Memory Healer Program

Dementia Test Online memory and brain treatment program.

The Dementia Test

The Dementia Test

http://stoppingdementia.com The Dementia Test to determine if you are going to be a candidate to get dementia, Alzheimer's, memory loss or some form of dementia.

Test For Dementia

Test For Dementia

This is a test for Dementia....the defintion is in the video....very simple only 4 questions and a bonus round...

Dementia: Diagnosis and Assessment

Dementia: Diagnosis and Assessment

How do you diagnose dementia? What is the Primary Care Physician's role in assessing a patient for dementia? Dr Kathleen Walsh interviews Dr Melissa Stiles about the diagnosis and assessment of a patient with dementia.

3 Easy Memory Games for Seniors

3 Easy Memory Games for Seniors

http://GetBrainGames.com - Scientific Brain Games for Seniors Surveys of seniors have shown that at least 3 in 5 seniors are concerned about memory loss or loss of mental capacity. Yet aging doesn't have to mean losing memory. In fact, many seniors manage to get smarter and have better memories as they age. Most senators and many past presidents are over the age of 50. Many CEOs of Fortune 500 companies are over the age of 50 or 60. It's not age or the passing of time that causes memory loss. It's when the brain ceases to be used that it starts to atrophy. One way to prevent memory loss and improve your memory is to challenge your mind and memory every single day. Here are three simple and easy memory games to help keep your mind active and your brain healthy. 1. The Matching Cards Game. Take a deck of cards and remove all diamonds and clubs. Then remove all the face cards. In the remaining deck are 20 cards, from Ace to Ten in just hearts and spades. Shuffles these cards and place them face down. Flip two cards over at a time and try to match the cards. Anytime you match two cards, remove them from the table. Try to clear the table in as few turns as possible. 2. The Remember Later Game. Sometime during the day, pick something to remember. For example, you might walk down the hall and tell yourself to remember that 12 plus 12 is 24. The next day, ask yourself: What was the thing you wanted to remember? Try to play this memory game with different things, like tasks, events, people's behaviors or phrases. 3. The Word Association Game. This game stretches your memories of words and concepts. It requires at least two people to play, but can be played with as many as four to six. Pick a category of words, such as foods or people. One person starts wit a word. The next person has to say a word where the first letter is the last letter of the previous word. For example, if the category is "food" and someone says "Apple," the next person might say "Egg," then someone might say "Grape." These games can all help you keep your mind sharp. Choose a game that you find both fun and challenging. Try to play a memory game every day. If you keep your mind active, you'll find that as you age your mental prowess will grow stronger rather than weaker. One easy way you can get in the habit of playing memory games is to leverage the power of software. There are many great memory game software that you can download, each designed to be both fun to play and challenging to the mind.

Mayo Clinic's Better Way to Test Dementia

Mayo Clinic's Better Way to Test Dementia

Researchers at Mayo Clinic developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia. The study is published in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our goal is to identify people who are at the highest risk for dementia as early as possible” said study author Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., Chester and Debbie Cadieux Director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Early detection of individuals at high risk of developing memory and thinking problems that we call mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is crucial because people with MCI are at a greater risk of developing dementia. This allows for a wider window of opportunity to initiate preventative measures.” The study involved 1,449 randomly selected people from Olmsted County, Minnesota between the ages of 70 and 89 who did not have memory and thinking problems. At the start of the study and at visits every 15 months for an average of 4.8 years, participants were given memory and thinking tests. During the study, 401 people — nearly a third — developed MCI. The scoring system took into account factors that could be easily obtained from medical records, such as years of education, number of medications, history of stroke or diabetes, and smoking. Researchers also factored in information obtained at the clinic visit, such as a test of thinking abilities, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and slow gait. Factors were assigned a score based on how much they contributed to the risk of developing thinking problems. For example, being diagnosed with diabetes before age 75 increased the risk score by 14 points, while having 12 or fewer years of education increased the risk by two points. Many predictive factors were different for men and women. While the risk of MCI increases with age overall, younger men were at a higher risk of developing MCI than younger women. Conversely, older women have a somewhat higher risk than older men. Variables such as age, diabetes, heart health risk factors, slow gait, depression and anxiety disorders, stand out as contributing most to the risk score. The APOE gene, which has been linked to a higher risk of dementia, was determined in the study to be only a moderate risk factor. “This risk scale provides an inexpensive and easy way for doctors to identify people who should be referred to more advanced testing for memory issues or may be better candidates for clinical trials,” said Petersen.

How to Test for Dementia

How to Test for Dementia

How to Test for Dementia Dementia is a typical, exceptionally crippling sickness, and it can now and again be hard to analyze. There is no surefire approach to test it at home, and a specialist's visit is very suggested on the off chance that you presume manifestations. A companion or relative can direct the Mini-Mental State Exam for a general thought of psychological capacity, however a specialist can make best utilization of the outcomes. Alternate segments on this page contain tests which you can take at home. These can give you a little data on the off chance that you have no different alternatives, yet they are not a decent trade for a specialist's determination, as indicated by the Alzheimer's Association. A few medications, medicinal conditions, and family history (demonstrating hereditary issues) can put you at higher danger of dementia. Others mirror a few side effects of dementia, for example, memory misfortune, yet can be switched if the specialist finds the cause. Be prepared to give your specialist the accompanying data Twitter :: https://twitter.com/Dr_helps Blogspot :: http://naturalhealthtipsonlinea.blogspot.com/ Tumblr :: http://naturalhealthtipsfan.tumblr.com/ Wordpress:: https://naturalhealthtipsfan.wordpress.com/

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