Bikes direct Unboxing - tools and info

Bikes direct Unboxing - tools and info

Unboxing a Bike Direct Bike. You will need two different metric hex wrenches and a standard wrench for the pedals is optional.

Viking Race Bike Review

Viking Race Bike Review

This bike is very good starter bike it costs approximately £185. For you are starting biking this is a bike for you. It is a very well built bike. No faults

Luna Gravity Full Suspension Mountain Ebike BBSHD / BBS02

Luna Gravity Full Suspension Mountain Ebike BBSHD / BBS02

We take a look at the electrified Luna Gravity....an entry level full suspension mid drive electric bike. It comes with either the BBSHD or the BBS02 ebike kit and a 700 watt hour 52v Panasonic Battery. PRODUCT LINK: https://lunacycle.com/gravity-ebike-fsx-275LTD-complete-electric-bike/ WEBSITE LINK: https://lunacycle.com FACEBOOK LINK: https://www.facebook.com/lunacycle/ FACEBOOK GROUP LINK: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fastebike/

How to Adjust Bicycle Gears

How to Adjust Bicycle Gears

A tutorial on how to adjust bicycle gears, with a focus on the rear derailleur. This tutorial was created by Atlanta Bicycle Shop, Intown Bicycles.

Third FatBike Ride 8-28-17 Fast

Third FatBike Ride 8-28-17  Fast

Great and fast ride on my FatBike Motobecane Boris X9 With The Bluto Fork! Big fun...

The Java Bike Trip

The Java Bike Trip

A group of friends head to Java on a mountain biking trip.

FatBike World At Lake Fairfax To Great Falls 9 16 17 With Miller

FatBike World At Lake Fairfax To Great Falls 9 16 17 With Miller

Outstanding ride with brother Miller! This is Miller's first real FatBike ride on his new Motobeane Fat Bike Night Train and me on my Motobeane Boris X9. The view at Great Falls was simply spectacular!!!

Larger Than Life

Larger Than Life

What do two college aged guys do whey they're bored on a Satuday night? Cover Backstreet Boys songs, is right! Check it out.

Windsor Rover 1 0 Bicycle Unpacking And Some Assembly Ideas. 28" Wheels

Windsor Rover 1 0 Bicycle Unpacking And Some Assembly Ideas.  28" Wheels

A video about unboxing and some basic assembly ideas of the Windsor Rover 1.0 Bicycle. This bike was from BikesDirect.com. This bike might also be called the Windsor Dover 1.0. A good idea, to begin "setting up/adjusting" your bicycle is once your handle bars are on, is to first adjust the seat height so that you legs are almost (but not quite) fully extended when sitting in the seat and either peddling, or when pedals are near the ground when just sitting on the bike (perhaps near a curb). Once this seat height is properly adjusted, you can then begin to adjust the handlebars height and angle, and sometimes the angle that you squeeze the brakes. The seat height is important for best efficiency of your energy at propelling the bicycle. Remember, you don't want to waste any force pressing the peddles down, but put the energy more into a forward in the direction you going. 28" wheeled bikes are supposedly better for distance (on paved roads) as compared to a standard 26" mountain bike. If your riding a bike in a city, with lots of traffic,and bumps, and sidewalks and rocky trails to get on and off of,then you are better off with a regular 26" mountain/comfort/hybrid bike. Any bike is capable of going a good distance, but sometimes you want some more efficiency, speed, and perhaps a lighter bike. Sometimes you can get tires that are better suited for trails, or the road with smoother tires to put on any bike to improve efficiency/smoothness, etc. In winter, you probably would like some tires with some good tred/"knobbies". A 28" wheeled bike seems to give you slightly better cruising speed, perhaps about 1.5 miles an hour faster on average. In a city, this may not happen since you will be stopping, and bumps, sidewalks, etc, and your better off with a more maneuverable and quicker response 26" std. mt./hybrid/comfort. The 28" wheeled bikes normally ride you a little higher, so if your afraid of some extra height, then don't bother getting one. If you are somewhat lackadaisical, clumsy, out for local sightseeing, obese (maybe a balloon tire/beach bike), taking it easy, then don't bother getting a 28" bike, and stick with the 26" bike types. Even people with several bikes have a 26" type, they are the most popular type. If you have to ride in lousy roads, bumps, sidewalks, then get a 26" type with wider tires. A 26" type bike is more maneuverable. If you live around winding roads with cars "flying" by then a bike is not a good thing to ride if you can't get off the road, or stay on the side of the road while riding. Another option, for anyone, especially in hilly areas, you have weak legs, is an electric bike. There are gas powered bikes, engines available, that can assist you most or all the way and these are essentially motorcycles. There is a law on the classifications, and if its below (I think) 25 or 35 mph then you don't need a license. If you live in a city, a bike is "gold". The bigger the city, the more precious a bike gets, to the point that if you don't have one for your local area, within a few miles, your not thinking right. A good tip when going up some inclines, is to hold the handlebars firmly (some even hold near the center a bit), with your arms, and consider sharing the forces between your arms and legs and not entirely of just your arms or legs. You don't want to have the feel of entirely pulling the bike up an incline entirely with your arms. Another tip is to lean or tip your bike over to one side to get on it if there is no sidewalk to stand on to get on. To lean your bike to one side, the peddle arm must be pointing upward some, so that you don't bump it on the ground when you tilt/lean the bike.. Another tip is to "down shift" to lower gear when coming to a stop, perhaps to 2nd gear, so that you can start out in an "easy" gear, and perhaps move quickly across a road when starting out. Another tip is a bike bag. Some items to carry, for example: A drink in a plastic bottle (if you dont have a water holder on your bike). A flashlight, if you don't have on one the front, you can still hold it a bit in your hand. There are laws about flashlights, and if your on the road, and depending on how busy it is, at night, you might get a ticket. Some tools - hex keys, wrenches or adjustable wrench, (short handle is good) screwdrivers. A pump, some can attach to the bike. A spare tube (if your tube blows out, you cant find the air hole leak without immersing the tube in water usually. It is much simpler to replace/exchange the tube than patch it. The tube with the hole can be patched later. A pen. Wallet with ID. Put things in plastic "baggies". Disclaimer: I am not a bike mechanic so this is only ideas shown in the video, and I am not to be held liable/responsible if you don't build it right and damage the bike or get an injury. Try to get someone, or view some videos, who knows more about bikes to help you if you need it.

Bike Maintenance: How to Replace a Derailleur Hanger

Bike Maintenance: How to Replace a Derailleur Hanger

The derailleur hanger connects the derailleur to the bike frame. If the hanger gets damaged or bent, you’ll need to replace it. In this video, we show you how to remove the rear derailleur and derailleur hanger, install a new hanger and reinstall the rear derailleur. Shop REI’s selection of derailleur hangers at http://www.rei.com/c/derailleur-hangers. Video Transcript: If your derailer takes a hit during your ride, the derailer hanger is there to absorb the impact. If the hanger gets damaged or bent, you'll need to replace it. You'll need a hex wrench, bike cleaner, and bike grease. Start by taking the rear wheel off your bike. Loosen and remove the bolt that connects the derailer to the hanger. It's fine to let the derailer hang from the shift cable while you work. Now remove the hanger insert from the drop outs on the frame. Some hangers will have two halves to remove. Before installing the replacement hanger, clean off the drop out area. Then lubricate both the inside and outside of the frame. Now you can install the new hanger and tighten it into place. Grease up the threads on the derailer mounting bolt and reconnect the derailer. It's best to use a torque wrench to tighten the bolt to the manufacturer's specified torque. Now re-install the rear wheel and make sure the gears are shifting normally. To recap, remove the rear wheel. Then remove the derailer from the hanger and the hanger from the frame. Install the new hanger. Replace the derailer and the wheel and shift through the gears.

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