49, XXXXX

49, XXXXX

XXXXX syndrome (also called pentasomy X or 49,XXXXX) is a type of aneuploidy (an abnormal number of chromosomes) which results in the presence of three additional X chromosomes. The condition was first described in 1963. It is characterised by severe mental retardation, short stature and abnormalities to the head and face. As these features can be seen in other conditions, karyotyping must be carried out to confirm diagnosis. There have been cases of XXXXX syndrome being misdiagnosed as Down syndrome. It is an extremely rare condition with no more than 30 patients reported in medical literature. The exact incidence is not known but it may be similar to the rate of 1 in 85,000 seen in males with 49, XXXXY syndrome. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Herbert Sobel

Herbert Sobel

Herbert M. Sobel Sr. (January 26, 1912 – September 30, 1987) was a commissioned officer with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division during World War II. Sobel was portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers by David Schwimmer. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Epic Systems

Epic Systems

Epic is a privately held health care software company, whose systems are installed in large major hospitals, and hold the medical records of almost half the patients in the U.S. It was founded in 1979 by Judith R. Faulkner. Originally headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, Epic moved its headquarters to nearby Verona, Wisconsin in 2005. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

1993 Zambia national football team air disaster

1993 Zambia national football team air disaster

The 1993 Zambia national football team air disaster occurred in the late evening of 27 April 1993 when a Zambian Air Force de Havilland Canada DHC-5D Buffalo (registration AF-319) crashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 500 metres (550 yards) offshore from Libreville, Gabon. The flight was carrying most of the Zambian national football team to a FIFA World Cup Qualifier against Senegal in Dakar. All 25 passengers and five crew members were killed. A Gabonese official investigation into the accident concluded that the pilot had shut down the wrong engine after a fire. The investigation found that pilot fatigue and an instrument error had contributed to the accident. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Stakeholder theory

Stakeholder theory

The stakeholder theory is a theory of organizational management and business ethics that addresses morals and values in managing an organization. It was originally detailed by R. Edward Freeman in the book Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach, and identifies and models the groups which are stakeholders of a corporation, and both describes and recommends methods by which management can give due regard to the interests of those groups. In short, it attempts to address the "principle of who or what really counts". In the traditional view of a company, the shareholder view, only the owners or shareholders (= stockholders) of the company are important, and the company has a binding fiduciary duty to put their needs first, to increase value for them. Stakeholder theory instead argues that there are other parties involved, including employees, customers, suppliers, financiers, communities, governmental bodies, political groups, trade associations, and trade unions. Even competitors are sometimes counted as stakeholders - their status being derived from their capacity to affect the firm and its stakeholders. The nature of what is a stakeholder is highly contested (Miles, 2012), with hundreds of definitions existing in the academic literature (Miles, 2011). This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

House of Habsburg

House of Habsburg

The House of Habsburg (/ˈhæbs.bɜrɡ/; German pronunciation: [ˈhaːps.bʊʁk]), also spelled Hapsburg, was one of the most important royal houses of Europe. The throne of the Holy Roman Empire was continuously occupied by the Habsburgs between 1438 and 1740. The house also produced kings of Bohemia, England, Germany, Hungary, Croatia, Ireland, Portugal, and Spain, as well as rulers of several Dutch and Italian countries. The House takes its name from Habsburg Castle, a fortress built in the 1020s in present-day Switzerland by Count Radbot of Klettgau, who chose to name his fortress Habsburg. His grandson, Otto II, was the first to take the fortress name as his own, adding "Count of Habsburg" to his title. The House of Habsburg gathered dynastic momentum through the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Cyclobenzaprine

Cyclobenzaprine

Cyclobenzaprine, brand names Amrix, Flexeril and Fexmid, is a muscle relaxer medication used to relieve skeletal muscle spasms and associated pain in acute musculoskeletal conditions. It is the best-studied drug for this application, it has also been used off-label for fibromyalgia treatment. A new bedtime formulation of cyclobenzaprine is under development for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Activated carbon

Activated carbon

Activated carbon, also called activated charcoal, activated coal, or carbo activatus, is a form of carbon processed to have small, low-volume pores that increase the surface area available for adsorption or chemical reactions. Activated is sometimes substituted with active. Due to its high degree of microporosity, just one gram of activated carbon has a surface area in excess of 500 m2, as determined by gas adsorption. An activation level sufficient for useful application may be attained solely from high surface area; however, further chemical treatment often enhances adsorption properties. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Local Government Act 2000

Local Government Act 2000

The Local Government Act 2000 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales. Its principal purposes are: to give powers to local authorities to promote economic, social and environmental well-being within their boundaries This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Audie Murphy

Audie Murphy

Audie Leon Murphy (20 June 1925 – 28 May 1971) was one of the most decorated American combat soldiers of World War II, receiving every military combat award for valor available from the U.S. Army, as well as French and Belgian awards for heroism. The 19-year-old Murphy received the Medal of Honor after single-handedly holding off an entire company of Germans for an hour at the Colmar Pocket in France in January 1945, then leading a successful counterattack while wounded and out of ammunition. Murphy was born into a large sharecropper family in Hunt County, Texas. His father abandoned them, and his mother died when he was a teenager. Murphy left school in fifth grade to pick cotton and find other work to help support his family; his skill with a hunting rifle was a necessity for putting food on the table. Murphy's older sister helped him to falsify documentation about his birth date to meet the minimum-age requirement for enlisting in the military, and after being turned down by the Navy and the Marine Corps he enlisted in the Army. He first saw action in the Allied invasion of Sicily and Anzio, and in 1944 was part of the liberation of Rome and invasion of southern France. Murphy fought at Montélimar, and led his men on a successful assault at the L'Omet quarry near Cleurie in northeastern France in October of that year. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

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