Sound Devices in Poe's The Raven

Sound Devices in Poe's The Raven

In this lecture I go very quickly over many terms used to analyze and discuss sound devices (like rhyme) in poetry, using Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven" as an example. See http://mrturnersenglish.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/english-11-nov-3-2/

The Raven and Rhyme Scheme

The Raven and Rhyme Scheme

How to Rap - Assonance, Consonance and Alliteration

How to Rap - Assonance, Consonance and Alliteration

https://www.udemy.com/rap-fundamentals/?couponCode=Youtubers To see more videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/donovonjenson Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/IAmDonoTG Twitter: @Donovonjenson Leave your questions in the comment box. I should have one of these out every other week so be on the lookout for that. Any quality improvement ideas would be great. Oh and don't forget to subscribe! How to Rap - Assonance, Consonance and Alliteration This week I'm gonna be talking about assonance, consonance and alliteration. You can use these techniques to give your pieces a more subtle, poetic sound. Alliteration is the most common, and what you'll be able to easily pick out of verses. Assonance and Consonance (vowels or consonants) Assonance: Repeated Vowel sounds Basically that's all it is, the same vowel sound repeated throughout different words in the line or bar. The letters don't have to be the same, the important part is the sound. Here's some examples so it'll make a little more sense Examples: tw[i]l[i]ght meets tw[i]ce at n[i]ght A Pr[ou]d r[ou]nd cl[ou]d with a m[ou]nd of cl[ou]t D[o] y[ou] like bl[ue] (same sounds, different letters) Consonance: Repeated consonant sounds Examples: No[rm], the wo[rm] was taken by sto[rm] Sla[m] the dru[m] into so[m]e [m]a[mm]al I ba[tt]le bri[tt]le wri[tt]ens in li[tt]le se[t]s Alliteration: First Syllable Repeating [B]ig [b]abies [b]ow to [b]othered [b]rothers [R]ed [r]angers [r]ope off the lower [r]ecepticle Sometimes the same letters can be pronounced in different ways, the important part is that the pronunciation sound is the same, not the spelling. As always, don't let these tools overshadow the meaning of your pieces. Next week either rhyme schemes or wordplay. Check out The Rhyme Sanctuary www.youtube.com/therhymesanctuary Resources: If you're a poet, I'd suggest www.text-stars.com **If you sign up here, please say that "Dono" referred you. Thanks!** If you're more of a punch, battle rapper, I'd suggest www.letsbeef.com

The Vocabulary of Sound Devices in Poetry

The Vocabulary of Sound Devices in Poetry

In this lecture I go very quickly over many terms used to analyze and discuss sound devices (like rhyme) in poetry, using Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven" as an example. See http://mrturnersenglish.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/english-11-nov-3-2/

MC Lars - Flow Like Poe (Official Video)

MC Lars - Flow Like Poe (Official Video)

Subscribe! http://bit.ly/1GcMy4m Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MCLars Twitter: https://twitter.com/MCLars Instagram: http://instagram.com/MC_Lars MC Lars’s #1 hit single “Flow Like Poe“ from his lit-hop EP record "the Edgar Allan Poe EP“ out now via Horris Records. http://horrisrecords.com http://mclars.com Get it on Spotify: http://spoti.fi/1SybIeH iTunes: http://apple.co/1YdWJdu Bandcamp: http://bit.ly/1MS8LRJ Compact Disc: http://bit.ly/20XYf5V or USB: http://bit.ly/1QIhz0k "The Edgar Allan Poe EP", © 2012 MC Lars This video premiered at the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards in Carnegie Hall (New York, NY) on June 1st, 2012. directed by Sean Donnelly (www.mrseandonnelly.com) animation help by Abbey Luck compositing help by Kevin Dazet research, driving and dancing by Steven Wong Camera and basically everything else by Tim Thompson Drum programming by Storyville String arrangement by Walt Ribeiro "Flow Like Poe" (lyrics by MC Lars) Edgar Allan Poe y'all Listen to me flow y'all Yo it's Edgar Allan Poe with a flow so poetic Melancholy wordsmith - style so phonetic Got a raven on my shoulder - gothic thematics Demonic alcoholic - multisyllabic It's a habit - take a look and I'm sure you'll find That the mechanics of rap are the mechanics of rhyme And when we analyze the rhythm of the units to the meter Long short, short long - doesn't matter, look at either An iamb is two syllables unstressed, stressed which The words insane, explain and delight all express A trochee on the other hand, goes stressed, unstressed Words like coffee, crazy, giant - so prepared to be impressed (But Poe what's an anapest?) Words like tambourine cavalier and Marianne, and by that I mean two unstressed, stressed syllables in succession that's our first lesson, okay any questions? CHORUS: Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) This is lit-hop 101 with MC Edgar Allan Poe Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) If you don't know, now you know Dimeter, means two feet, trimeter three Tetrameter is four, so pentameter must be Five pairs of syllables, Shakespearean sonnets "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" now you got it Unstressed, stressed, five times, flow iambic Stressed, unstressed watch me flip the dynamic like Once upon a midnight dreary, that's the start of my couplet clearly trochaic octameter, rhythm might damage The cadence is so quick, but I think your ear can manage Mysterious sci-fi rhymes always getting hotter Drunk in the club watch me holler at your daughter Baltimore ravens, that's my team Original hipster, well it might seem From the Bronx back to Boston, I'm rockin' the 'stache Got Emerson and Twain, both talkin' mad trash REPEAT CHORUS Iambic assonance bringing passion just like that Cutting with the consonance I kill it I attack Alliterating awesomely amazing add the energy Pentameter is popping with the literary entropy I'm on these spondees dactylic swagger the similes I drop are sharper than daggers My metaphors are arrows, call me Katnis Everdeen Hunger games with the quill illest MC ever seen Check the Emily Dickinson, slant rhyme, 'cause I'm spittin' some Strange and creepy magnificence, 19th century citizen Hella props well I'm getting some, darker than Charles Dickins, son Gory stories I've written 'em, teenage corpses I'm kissin' them 'Cause ladies I'm missin' 'em, and I've influenced Eminem With the horrorcore flavor so call me Jonathan Livingston Got that the onomatopoeia poppin' off in the classroom Bringing poetry to life with these literary rap tunes REPEAT CHORUS

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

Poetry (from the Greek poiesis — ποίησις — with a broad meaning of a "making", seen also in such terms as "hemopoiesis"; more narrowly, the making of poetry) is a form of literary art which uses aesthetic and rhythmic[1][2][3] qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively-informative, prosaic forms of writing. From the mid-20th century, poetry has sometimes been more generally regarded as a fundamental creative act employing language. Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses. Devices such as assonance, alliteration, onomatopoeia and rhythm are sometimes used to achieve musical or incantatory effects. The use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, metaphor, simile and metonymy[4] create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm. Some poetry types are specific to particular cultures and genres and respond to characteristics of the language in which the poet writes. Readers accustomed to identifying poetry with Dante, Goethe, Mickiewicz and Rumi may think of it as written in lines based on rhyme and regular meter; there are, however, traditions, such as Biblical poetry, that use other means to create rhythm and euphony. Much modern poetry reflects a critique of poetic tradition,[5] playing with and testing, among other things, the principle of euphony itself, sometimes altogether forgoing rhyme or set rhythm.[6][7] In today's increasingly globalized world, poets often adapt forms, styles and techniques from diverse cultures and languages.

flo liek po

flo liek po

I think it's obvious to say that I don't own this. Flow Like Poe: Bass Boosted. MC Lars "Flow Like Poe" Lyrics: Edgar Allan Poe y'all Listen to me flow y'all Yo it's Edgar Allan Poe with a flow so poetic Melancholy wordsmith - style so phonetic Got a raven on my shoulder - gothic thematics Demonic alcoholic - multisyllabic It's a habit - take a look and I'm sure you'll find That the mechanics of rap are the mechanics of rhyme And when we analyze the rhythm of the units to the meter Long short, short long - doesn't matter, look at either An iamb is two syllables unstressed, stressed which The words insane, explain and delight all express A trochee on the other hand, goes stressed, unstressed Words like coffee, crazy, giant - so prepared to be impressed (But Poe what's an anapest?) Words like tambourine cavalier and Marianne, and by that I mean two unstressed, stressed syllables in succession that's our first lesson, okay any questions? CHORUS: Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) This is lit-hop 101 with MC Edgar Allan Poe Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) If you don't know, now you know Dimeter, means two feet, trimeter three Tetrameter is four, so pentameter must be Five pairs of syllables, Shakespearean sonnets "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" now you got it Unstressed, stressed, five times, flow iambic Stressed, unstressed watch me flip the dynamic like Once upon a midnight dreary, that's the start of my couplet clearly trochaic octameter, rhythm might damage The cadence is so quick, but I think your ear can manage Mysterious sci-fi rhymes always getting hotter Drunk in the club watch me holler at your daughter Baltimore ravens, that's my team Original hipster, well it might seem From the Bronx back to Boston, I'm rockin' the 'stache Got Emerson and Twain, both talkin' mad trash REPEAT CHORUS Iambic assonance bringing passion just like that Cutting with the consonance I kill it I attack Alliterating awesomely amazing add the energy Pentameter is popping with the literary entropy I'm on these spondees dactylic swagger the similes I drop are sharper than daggers My metaphors are arrows, call me Katnis Everdeen Hunger games with the quill illest MC ever seen Check the Emily Dickinson, slant rhyme, 'cause I'm spittin' some Strange and creepy magnificence, 19th century citizen Hella props well I'm getting some, darker than Charles Dickins, son Gory stories I've written 'em, teenage corpses I'm kissin' them 'Cause ladies I'm missin' 'em, and I've influenced Eminem With the horrorcore flavor so call me Jonathan Livingston Got that the onomatopoeia poppin' off in the classroom Bringing poetry to life with these literary rap tunes REPEAT CHORUS

Ghosts N' Goblins - Angry Video Game Nerd - Episode 108

Ghosts N' Goblins - Angry Video Game Nerd - Episode 108

Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=JamesNintendoNerd Watch all Angry Video Game Nerd episodes https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2B009153AC977F90 Angry Video Game Nerd (Episode 108) Ghosts N' Goblins Ghosts N' Goblins is regarded as one of the more difficult games in the NES library. Ghosts N' Goblins allows the player to control a knight on a perilous journey to rescue the princess, battling zombies, ghouls and demons on the way. Published by Capcom and released on September 19, 1985, Ghosts N' Goblins, although notorious for its difficulty and rage-inducing qualities managed to get positive reviews and made an appearance on the top 200 game list. Follow the Nerd in this episode as he sacrifices his sanity to save the princess and to be able to say, "I beat Ghosts N' Goblins"! Visit our website! http://cinemassacre.com/ James Twitter! https://twitter.com/cinemassacre Mike's Twitter! https://twitter.com/Mike_Matei Our Google+ https://plus.google.com/+JamesNintendoNerd Our Tumblr! http://cinemassacreproductions.tumblr.com Our Facebook Fanpage! https://www.facebook.com/Cinemassacre Our Instagram! http://instagram.com/cinemassacre Our Reddit! http://www.reddit.com/r/TheCinemassacre/ Our Flattr! https://flattr.com/profile/cinemassacre Check out these other classic AVGN episodes! AVGN: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjUz8IT0CYg AVGN: Top Gun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofM11nPzFo0 AVGN: Friday the 13th https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1raUvGNbZFg AVGN: The Power Glove https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYDuy7wM8Gk AVGN: Bible Games https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkNvQYiM6bw AVGN: Bugs Bunny Birthday Blowout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1tU61Nyv1w AVGN: NES Accessories https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kBMscW_dVg AVGN Batman https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFvtk5toGJg #retro #retrogaming #nes #snes #jamesrolfe #mikematei #atari #playthrough #gameplay #gamereview

How To Rap: Transitioning Between Rhyme Schemes

How To Rap: Transitioning Between Rhyme Schemes

How To Rap: Transitioning Between Rhyme Schemes I’ve gotten a question about how to transition smoothly between different rhyme scheme when changing bars. This assumes you know what rhyme schemes are and how to identify bars, if not, you’re going to need to check out a couple other lessons. Anyway on to the subject; Transitions are something I see a lot of beginners struggling with. What happens is they get locked into a rhyme scheme and don’t know how to transition out smoothly, especially when using multi-syllable rhymes. Luckily, this is pretty easy to overcome. I’ll explain it in a simple way, but this also applies to multis, or any other scheme set you choose to use. So for example you might end your first bar with fire. The next bar will most likely end with a word that rhymes with fire, let’s say retire. Every day I wake up and spit fire Repeat the routine till the day I retire From here, you might want to continue your A scheme and add a couple more lines It’s easy when the world leaves me inspired And the bap of beats keeps taking me higher At this point, it might feel natural to just continue the A scheme but you might be out of rhymes that make sense, and you don’t want to force it. It might also feel a little jarring to jump straight into a B scheme because you’ve already built this A scheme. An easy way to smooth the transition is to use internal rhymes. Let’s contrast two examples example based on our previous work to show you what I mean. Here’s the first version, without an internal rhyme: Every day I wake up and all I do is spit (fire) A Repeat the routine till the day I (retire) A It’s easy when the world leaves me so (inspired) A And the bap of beats keeps taking me (higher) A Now they call me the god, out to start a new (religion) B Baptized by the rhymes then they take a new (position) B And here’s the second version, with an internal rhyme: Every day I wake up and all I do is spit (fire) A Repeat the routine till the day I (retire) A It’s easy when the world leaves me so (inspired) A And the bap of beats keeps taking me (higher) A Now they call me the (friar)A, out to start a new (religion) B Baptized by the rhymes then they take a new (position) B Notice how one internal rhyme makes the transition into the new scheme sound much more smooth. Now, it won’t always make sense to do something like this, you need to consider what effect you’re trying to have. If the only internal rhymes you can come up with dilute your message or sound forced, then it’s totally fine to transition without them. As with everything else, this is just a tool you can use, not a rule. Hopefully that helps, I wish you the best of luck. Keep practicing. Leave your questions in the comment box. Oh and don't forget to subscribe! Get hip-hop themed T-shirts from my store here: http://www.snapmerch.storenvy.com To see more videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/donovonjenson Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/IAmDonoTG Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/RapWithDono Twitter: @Donovonjenson Check for updates on my music promotion website: http://noteis.us Facebook: www.facebook.com/noteisus Twitter: @Noteisus

"Hope Is The Thing With Feathers" Emily Dickinson poem GREAT METAPHOR about hope!

"Hope Is The Thing With Feathers" Emily Dickinson poem GREAT METAPHOR about hope!

Marian Seldes is the first voice we hear (too fast!). Julie Harris is the 2nd voice (just right!). ANALYSIS: This poem says that hope is alive in us like a little bird. That is not personification, by the way--you need a human quality before that word is relevant. Hope chirps in us, and chirping is a happy sound. Hope is hard to crush. Hope doesn’t even ask for anything in return! When we have hard times, that bird has a sweeter sound than ever (we welcome that sound when we are down). Hope, or that little bird, is most valuable in hard times. Hope means we look forward to something good in the future. But if times are too hard, like in times of trauma, then hope can be subdued or crushed or maybe dead in us--to “abash” a bird is to threaten the bird or make it feel bad about itself to the extent that chirping goes away. Sometimes a few humans give up hope, no longer believing in good times coming. Emily Dickinson made up a word with "chillest." She is very clever with assonance in the penultimate line: "Yet, never, in extremity." Wow! That's a lot of repeating of that vowel! Did anyone ever before fit "extremity" into a poem and maintain iambic rhythm as this one does? All lines are iambic except for the opening line. I love the SOUND of this poem in addition to the clever comparison of hope to a bird that chirps away despite dire conditions, silenced only in extreme duress. I like to teach Emily Dickinson to my sophomores at the same time we are reading Jane Austen--two giants of the 19th century! Hope Is The Thing With Feathers By Emily Dickinson Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul, And sings the tune without the words, And never stops at all, And sweetest in the gale is heard; And sore must be the storm That could abash the little bird That kept so many warm. I've heard it in the chillest land, And on the strangest sea; Yet, never, in extremity, It asked a crumb of me.

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