Sound Devices in Poe's The Raven

Sound Devices in Poe's The Raven

In this lecture I go very quickly over many terms used to analyze and discuss sound devices (like rhyme) in poetry, using Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven" as an example. See http://mrturnersenglish.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/english-11-nov-3-2/

Alliteration in The Raven

Alliteration in The Raven

The Vocabulary of Sound Devices in Poetry

The Vocabulary of Sound Devices in Poetry

In this lecture I go very quickly over many terms used to analyze and discuss sound devices (like rhyme) in poetry, using Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven" as an example. See http://mrturnersenglish.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/english-11-nov-3-2/

How to Rap - Assonance, Consonance and Alliteration

How to Rap - Assonance, Consonance and Alliteration

https://www.udemy.com/rap-fundamentals/?couponCode=Youtubers To see more videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/donovonjenson Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/IAmDonoTG Twitter: @Donovonjenson Leave your questions in the comment box. I should have one of these out every other week so be on the lookout for that. Any quality improvement ideas would be great. Oh and don't forget to subscribe! How to Rap - Assonance, Consonance and Alliteration This week I'm gonna be talking about assonance, consonance and alliteration. You can use these techniques to give your pieces a more subtle, poetic sound. Alliteration is the most common, and what you'll be able to easily pick out of verses. Assonance and Consonance (vowels or consonants) Assonance: Repeated Vowel sounds Basically that's all it is, the same vowel sound repeated throughout different words in the line or bar. The letters don't have to be the same, the important part is the sound. Here's some examples so it'll make a little more sense Examples: tw[i]l[i]ght meets tw[i]ce at n[i]ght A Pr[ou]d r[ou]nd cl[ou]d with a m[ou]nd of cl[ou]t D[o] y[ou] like bl[ue] (same sounds, different letters) Consonance: Repeated consonant sounds Examples: No[rm], the wo[rm] was taken by sto[rm] Sla[m] the dru[m] into so[m]e [m]a[mm]al I ba[tt]le bri[tt]le wri[tt]ens in li[tt]le se[t]s Alliteration: First Syllable Repeating [B]ig [b]abies [b]ow to [b]othered [b]rothers [R]ed [r]angers [r]ope off the lower [r]ecepticle Sometimes the same letters can be pronounced in different ways, the important part is that the pronunciation sound is the same, not the spelling. As always, don't let these tools overshadow the meaning of your pieces. Next week either rhyme schemes or wordplay. Check out The Rhyme Sanctuary www.youtube.com/therhymesanctuary Resources: If you're a poet, I'd suggest www.text-stars.com **If you sign up here, please say that "Dono" referred you. Thanks!** If you're more of a punch, battle rapper, I'd suggest www.letsbeef.com

The Raven / Edgar Allan Poe / Reading by Vincent Price

The Raven / Edgar Allan Poe /  Reading by Vincent Price

"The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student,[1][2] is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references. Poe claimed to have written the poem very logically and methodically, intending to create a poem that would appeal to both critical and popular tastes, as he explained in his 1846 follow-up essay, "The Philosophy of Composition". The poem was inspired in part by a talking raven in the novel Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of 'Eighty by Charles Dickens.[3] Poe borrows the complex rhythm and meter of Elizabeth Barrett's poem "Lady Geraldine's Courtship", and makes use of internal rhyme as well as alliteration throughout. "The Raven" was first attributed to Poe in print in the New York Evening Mirror on January 29, 1845. Its publication made Poe widely popular in his lifetime, although it did not bring him much financial success. The poem was soon reprinted, parodied, and illustrated. Critical opinion is divided as to the poem's literary status, but it nevertheless remains one of the most famous poems ever written.

What's the Difference: Assonance vs. Consonance

What's the Difference: Assonance vs. Consonance

A flipped lesson about assonance and consonance.

How to Read The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe

How to Read The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe

MindTreeX presents An Enriched Audio production of Edgar Allen Poe's masterpiece poem, The Raven. Start Reading by first Understanding the Vocabulary... 1. Quaint – attractively unusual or old-fashioned 2. Surcease – a temporary respite or end 3. Entreating –ask someone earnestly or anxiously to do something 4. Implore –beg someone earnestly or desperately to do something 5. Token – done for the sake of appearances or as a symbolic gesture 6. Thereat – at that place 7. Obeisance - deferential respect 8. Mien – a person's look or manner, especially one of a particular kind indicating their character or mood 9. Pallas – a.k.a Athena the greek goddess of wisdom, craft, and war 10. Beguiling – charm or enchant (someone), sometimes in a deceptive way 11. Countenance – a person's face or facial expression 12. Craven – having or showing a complete lack of courage : very cowardly 13. Discourse – written or spoken communication or debate 14. Placid – serenely free of interruption or disturbance 15. Dirges – a lament for the dead, especially one forming part of a funeral rite 16. Betook – to cause (oneself) to go 17. Divining – discover (something) by guesswork or intuition: 18. Censer – a container in which incense is burned, typically during a religious ceremony. 19. Seraphim – a type of celestial or heavenly being, “the burning ones” of the highest rank, caretakers of God’s throne. 20. Respite – a short period of rest or relief from something difficult or unpleasant 21. Nepenthe – a potion used by the ancients to induce forgetfulness of pain or sorrow 22. Quaff -drink (something, especially an alcoholic drink) heartily 23. Tempest – a violent windy storm 24. Gilead – region of ancient holy land (Palestine) 25. Aidenn – aka Eden, the garden of God 26. Plutonian – of or associated with the underworld: Pluto aka Hades is the ruler of the underworld 27. Pallid – lacking sparkle or liveliness: dull Then Understand 3 Reasons Why The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe is the best Poem EVER! Reason One: The Master Craftsmanship Edgar Allen Poe explains that he constructed this poem very deliberately, using the well-known techniques of literature to purposely manipulate the reader into a state of high  emotion. He masterfully wielded the tools of Alliteration (the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words), Assonance (the repetition of the sound of a vowel or diphthong), and controlled meter (the rhythm of a piece of poetry, determined by the number and length of feet in a line) to create a poem that appears to be possessed of extreme meaning, however, if what he claims is true, the poem is nothing but than a very well organized collection of words. Because of their masterful placement, and the miracles of language, the reader fills in much the meaning which Poe never consciously created. This means the poem changes for every reader, just as the smile of the Mona Lisa changes depending on the viewer. Each and every person that reads the poem become a co-creator and brings it to life by imbuing it with meaning. Reason Two: Restores balance to the force… The Raven was first published under the name Edgar Allen Poe in the New York Evening Mirror on January 29, 1845, and along with much of Poe's other works represent the "dark romanticism" necessary to restore proper balance to the state of American literature, which at this time was being overwhelmed by the flowering fever of the transcendentalist movement. Poe's poem is the dark, to Thoreau's prose light. The second pole in the bipolar expression of America's experience with beauty and truth. Without the contrast neither writer's works could be fully appreciated, as the bitter pain in life provides the comparison which make the joys that much sweeter. What would Luke be without Darth Vader?  Speaking of Darth Vader... Reason Three: The Simpson's Adaptation....Please follow link for full post blog post... https://mindtreex.com/2017/01/08/3-reasons-why-the-raven-by-edgar-allen-poe-is-the-best-poem-ever/ Next Understand the Pain of Edgar Allen Poe Poe was born in Boston. His father abandoned the family in 1810, and his mother died the following year. In 1836, he married Virginia Clemm, his 13-year-old cousin. His wife died of tuberculosis. Poe died in Baltimore on October 7, 1849, at age 40; the cause of his death is unknown and has been variously attributed to alcohol, "brain congestion", cholera, drugs, heart disease, rabies, suicide, and tuberculosis. Finally, Listen to a fully enriched and rightfully haunting audio narration... Listen with headphones in the dark for full effect!

MC Lars - Flow Like Poe (Official Video)

MC Lars - Flow Like Poe (Official Video)

Subscribe! http://bit.ly/1GcMy4m Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MCLars Twitter: https://twitter.com/MCLars Instagram: http://instagram.com/MC_Lars MC Lars’s #1 hit single “Flow Like Poe“ from his lit-hop EP record "the Edgar Allan Poe EP“ out now via Horris Records. http://horrisrecords.com http://mclars.com Get it on Spotify: http://spoti.fi/1SybIeH iTunes: http://apple.co/1YdWJdu Bandcamp: http://bit.ly/1MS8LRJ Compact Disc: http://bit.ly/20XYf5V or USB: http://bit.ly/1QIhz0k "The Edgar Allan Poe EP", © 2012 MC Lars This video premiered at the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards in Carnegie Hall (New York, NY) on June 1st, 2012. directed by Sean Donnelly (www.mrseandonnelly.com) animation help by Abbey Luck compositing help by Kevin Dazet research, driving and dancing by Steven Wong Camera and basically everything else by Tim Thompson Drum programming by Storyville String arrangement by Walt Ribeiro "Flow Like Poe" (lyrics by MC Lars) Edgar Allan Poe y'all Listen to me flow y'all Yo it's Edgar Allan Poe with a flow so poetic Melancholy wordsmith - style so phonetic Got a raven on my shoulder - gothic thematics Demonic alcoholic - multisyllabic It's a habit - take a look and I'm sure you'll find That the mechanics of rap are the mechanics of rhyme And when we analyze the rhythm of the units to the meter Long short, short long - doesn't matter, look at either An iamb is two syllables unstressed, stressed which The words insane, explain and delight all express A trochee on the other hand, goes stressed, unstressed Words like coffee, crazy, giant - so prepared to be impressed (But Poe what's an anapest?) Words like tambourine cavalier and Marianne, and by that I mean two unstressed, stressed syllables in succession that's our first lesson, okay any questions? CHORUS: Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) This is lit-hop 101 with MC Edgar Allan Poe Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) Flow like Poe (I'm going hard on that tetrameter) If you don't know, now you know Dimeter, means two feet, trimeter three Tetrameter is four, so pentameter must be Five pairs of syllables, Shakespearean sonnets "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" now you got it Unstressed, stressed, five times, flow iambic Stressed, unstressed watch me flip the dynamic like Once upon a midnight dreary, that's the start of my couplet clearly trochaic octameter, rhythm might damage The cadence is so quick, but I think your ear can manage Mysterious sci-fi rhymes always getting hotter Drunk in the club watch me holler at your daughter Baltimore ravens, that's my team Original hipster, well it might seem From the Bronx back to Boston, I'm rockin' the 'stache Got Emerson and Twain, both talkin' mad trash REPEAT CHORUS Iambic assonance bringing passion just like that Cutting with the consonance I kill it I attack Alliterating awesomely amazing add the energy Pentameter is popping with the literary entropy I'm on these spondees dactylic swagger the similes I drop are sharper than daggers My metaphors are arrows, call me Katnis Everdeen Hunger games with the quill illest MC ever seen Check the Emily Dickinson, slant rhyme, 'cause I'm spittin' some Strange and creepy magnificence, 19th century citizen Hella props well I'm getting some, darker than Charles Dickins, son Gory stories I've written 'em, teenage corpses I'm kissin' them 'Cause ladies I'm missin' 'em, and I've influenced Eminem With the horrorcore flavor so call me Jonathan Livingston Got that the onomatopoeia poppin' off in the classroom Bringing poetry to life with these literary rap tunes REPEAT CHORUS

Sound Devices Song

Sound Devices Song

Rhythm Rhyme Repetition Onomatopoeia Alliteration

"Enigma" by: Edgar Allen Poe

"Enigma" by: Edgar Allen Poe

Original Story: http://creepypasta.wikia.com/wiki/Enigma Music by Myuuji: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piFJVwr1YYA&list=UUiSKnkKCKAQVxMUWpZQobuQ Photo from Google Images

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