Arabic Food in Jordan - HUGE MAQLUBA (مقلوبة) Upside Down Chicken Rice Platter!

Arabic Food in Jordan - HUGE MAQLUBA (مقلوبة) Upside Down Chicken Rice Platter!

Get more Amman travel tips, things to do, where to stay, and delicious food here: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ On Day 5 of our trip to Jordan we traveled outside of Amman, first to Dana Village in the Dana Biosphere Reserve. We had an incredible local lunch, and were served a dish called muqlaba, which literally translates to upside down - it was an incredible local meal. Finally, we moved onto Petra, and after checking into our hotel, we went to Petra by Night. 00:23 Breakfast and Leaving Hotel - To begin the day, I had a quick breakfast as the hotel in Amman, and then we packed everything up and headed off to do some traveling around Jordan. Driving towards the Dana Biosphere Reserve, we took our time, stopping off at a variety of different rest stops. One of the things I grew to love immensely while traveling in Jordan was Arabic coffee, and the good news is that coffee was available at every rest stop along the highway. 1:41 Maqluba (مقلوبة‎) at Dana Biosphere - The Dana Biosphere is a nature reserve in Jordan. The reserve is home to a variety of different natural environment, and starts on a plateau and descends all the way down in the Wadi Rum valley. The views of the valley were incredible. We continued driving until we reached the Dana Village, located on a hill overlooking the valley - it’s a historic town in Jordan, and they are trying to renovate certain areas of it - it’s an amazing little village. They had set up for us to have a local Jordan food lunch at a home within the village, so after walking around for a little while, we went inside to have lunch. There’s a famous Middle Eastern, Arabic dish, that’s also very common in Jordan called muqluba (مقلوبة‎), which directly translates to upside down. The reason it’s called upside down, or flipped over, is because the dish is cooked in a big pot, with meat and spices, or in this case chicken, topped with rice all in the same pot. When the dish cooks, all the flavors start to mingle and blend to create another incredible dish. When it’s finished cooking, the pot is flipped over onto a tray, so the rice goes to the bottom, while the meat stays on top - that’s the upside down part. After the rice and chicken was flipped onto the tray, it was then topped with lots of chopped up parsley, fried peanuts, and finally some lemon slices for decoration. The dish was incredible, the r 11:08 Wadi Musa, Movenpick Hotel, Musakhan for dinner - After our incredible lunch at Dana Village, we continued driving. Along the way to Petra, we stopped at Wadi Musa, which is said to be the place where Moses struck the rock and water came out. There was a rock there, and extremely clear water was flowing out. We drove to Movenpick Hotel at Petra, and we checked in. For dinner, we ate at the Movenpick buffet restaurant, and they had a good selection of both Western and Jordanian food. The dish I was most interested in eating was the musakhan, a Jordanian and Palestinian food of bread, chicken and spices, all cooked in lots of olive oil. It was my first time to try it, and I enjoyed it - and I can only imagine how much better it would be home-cooked. 14:58 Petra By Night - Petra is the most famous attraction in all of Jordan - some people will visit Jordan with a specific purpose to visit the historical city. One company decided to set up candles in paper bags and open Petra by Night, so you can visit the main Treasury at night. Ying and I took the walk, and it was pretty cool, but it was still so dark, that honestly I couldn’t really see anything, and my camera couldn’t really pick up anything as well. So stay tuned for tomorrow’s video where we visited Petra for the entire day! -- Check out my Amman, Jordan Travel Guide: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ (Including where to stay, what to see, safety information, and extra tips) MY WEBSITES: Migrationology.com: http://migrationology.com/ EatingThaiFood.com: http://eatingthaifood.com/ TravelByYing.com: http://travelbyying.com/ T-shirts & Food Guides: https://migrationology.com/store/ Resources: http://migrationology.com/travel-resources/ SOCIAL MEDIA: Snapchat: @migrationology Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology Thank you very much for watching this video! --

Petra - Exploring the Amazing Rock City of Jordan

Petra - Exploring the Amazing Rock City of Jordan

Petra, also known as the Lost City or the Red Rock City, is an ancient Nabatean holy city, carved into the rocks in southern Jordan. It’s an amazing place to see in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Check out my Amman travel guide: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ On Day 6 of our trip to Jordan, we woke up in the morning, had breakfast at our hotel, and continued on to the gates of Petra. The entrance ticket price of visiting Petra is 50 JD ($70.23), which is on the pricey side, but well worth it to visit this incredible city. Before going into the gates, I stopped on the outside and purchased a keffiyeh (4 JD ($5.62), the traditional Middle Eastern checkered cloth headdress. After that, I was ready to go and explore Petra! When you see pictures of Petra, at least in my case, you can’t really tell how big it is, or the scale of it - it’s not just one building on tomb, but it’s an entire city, spread out through the red rocks of Petra, through canyons and valley and rock mountains. So it’s a huge site that can take a full day, or even many days (if you had the time) to explore. So rather than just going to see a single attractions, Petra is like walking into a historical amusement city, full of surprises, mountains to climb, and ancient tombs to explore. Just for a bit of history, Petra was built by the ancient Nabateans, likely somewhere around the 300 BC date range. The Nabateans were a nomadic Arabian tribe who were specialist in trade, especially across the Arabian desert. They would run camel caravans and trade to lands across the desert, and due to their incredible desert and sky skills, they could navigate the desert and not only survive, but thrive. They made a fortune trading frankincense and myrrh, and doing so, they made a fortune. Similar to the ancient Egyptians, when the Nabateans became very wealthy, they started to think more about their after-life, and so they decided to build tombs within the rocks of Petra. At first I was thinking that the sites of Petra were temples or houses, but the majority, especially the fancy ornate rock carving at Petra are all tombs. The city of Petra eventually became deserted, and it was hidden for about a thousand years, before being rediscovered by Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt in 1812. After entering the Rock City, you first walk through a slot canyon, which was the main roadway leading directly into the center of Petra. You can either walk, or they also have horse chariots if you want to ride. One of the most famous tombs at Petra is known as the The Treasury (Al Khazneh), which was named so because some people believed there was treasure hidden high in the rock above it. The Treasury, also a tomb, is one of the best preserved and most incredible things to see when you visit Petra. The tombs are carved directly out of the side of the red rock mountains, and what’s really interesting is that the Nabateans were influenced by many different civilizations, as one can tell from the construction. The Treasury has lots of Greek influence, along with Arab and local Middle Eastern details as well. We continued hiking, and visiting many more of the tombs around Petra. Another famous place to see in the city is The Monastery (Ad Deir), which requires a hike that took about 45 minutes. The Monastery looks remarkably similar to the Treasury, but it’s just three times the size. There are some incredible views, and from The Monastery, you can do some more small hikes to get some wonderful views of the rugged mountain rocks. For dinner we headed to a restaurant in town called Al Qantarah - a nice restaurant housed in a rock building. Along with some fantastic fresh fish, that the owner of the restaurant had caught himself, we also had a main dish of lamb and rice cooked in a claypot. The lamb was amazingly tender and the rice was fragrant. Dinner was the best way to end an incredible day tour exploring the fascinating city of Petra. -- MY WEBSITES: Migrationology.com: http://migrationology.com/ EatingThaiFood.com: http://eatingthaifood.com/ TravelByYing.com: http://travelbyying.com/ T-shirts & Food Guides: https://migrationology.com/store/ Resources: http://migrationology.com/travel-resources/ SOCIAL MEDIA: Snapchat: @migrationology Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology Thank you very much for watching this Petra video! Check out my Amman, Jordan Travel Guide: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ (Including where to stay, what to see, safety information, and extra tips)

Shish Kebabs Meat Platter in Jordan!

Shish Kebabs Meat Platter in Jordan!

Get more Amman travel tips, things to do, where to stay, and delicious food here: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ On Day 4 of our trip to Jordan, we started off in Amman where we had a wonderful simple and local style breakfast of manakish, which are rounds of dough which are flattened, topped with simple things like zaatar and cheese, and baked in an oven. We then took a day trip to As-Salt or also just known as Salt, a historical city about a 45 minute drive from the center of Amman. The highlight of the day for me was the giant shish kebab meat platter that we ate for lunch! 00:38 Manakish - Manakish is something you’ll eat a lot of when you visit the Levant and in Jordan it’s a very popular snack and meal. Manakish is a piece of rounded dough which is flattened out and topped in a variety of different things. We ordered a manakish topped with zaatar, a special herb thyme blend, and also a couple topped with Jordanian white cheese, which is similar to halloumi cheese. They were all excellent mainly because they were baked so fresh and just used simple but delicious ingredients. Price - 1 JD ($1.41) each 04:20 Day to to As-Salt, Historic Old Salt Museum - 1 JD ($1.41) - Out main activity of the day was taking a short day trip to Salt, an ancient and historical city that was one of the commercial and trade centers of Jordan. We started off at the Historic Salt Museum, where we had a tour and learned a little bit about the importance of the city and how it influenced and shaped Jordan. We then took a stroll through Hamam street, the center old market street in Salt. 07:27 Al-Salam Restaurant - For lunch we went to a Jordanian meat bbq restaurant in the center of Salt called Al-Salam Restaurant. The first dish I tasted was the hummus ma lahma, a plate of hummus topped with minced meat fried in lard - it took hummus to the next level - it was absolutely incredible. Then came galayet with meat, a thick tomato based dish with minced meat in it as well. It was delicious with bread. From there, this Jordanian meal just got better and better. Arayes is a dish of bread stuffed with minced lamb and seasoning, then grilled over charcoal. The fat from the lamb makes the bread nearly taste like it’s deep fried because it gets so crispy, yet it’s merely grilled - and it was insanely delicious. But the ultimate winner of our Jordanian meat feast this time was the platter of shish kebabs and lamb pieces. The minced meat was mixed with parsley and seasoning, salted quite heavily, then grilled over hot charcoal. The mix and ratio of meat to fat ensured that the meat had an incredibly pronounced smoky taste. Total price - 25 JD ($35.26) for 4 14:01 Anabtawi Sweets - For dessert we took a walk down the road to a famous Jordanian sweets shop called Anabtawi Sweets, where Fadi ordered a mix of different desserts including hareeseh, one of the famous desserts, cream fingers, and warbat. They were all very sweet, but alright in small portions - I’m not a huge desserts lover. My favorite dessert was probably the warbat, it was kind of a cross between a cheese cake and baklava. What I really enjoyed about eating this dessert is the Arabic coffee that went with it. After having this cup of Arabic coffee, I was immediately hooked. 17:26 Thyme & More - Although it was unplanned at first, we decided to stop by a place called Thyme & More to taste some different and unique varieties of za’atar, a thyme and herb blend that’s very common in Jordan, and something I really loved eating. We tasted some incredible za’atar, and then the owner kindly invited us to have dinner at his restaurant where he served us some pizza and a giant calzone. -- Check out my Amman, Jordan Travel Guide: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ (Including where to stay, what to see, safety information, and extra tips) MY WEBSITES: Migrationology.com: http://migrationology.com/ EatingThaiFood.com: http://eatingthaifood.com/ TravelByYing.com: http://travelbyying.com/ T-shirts & Food Guides: https://migrationology.com/store/ Resources: http://migrationology.com/travel-resources/ SOCIAL MEDIA: Snapchat: @migrationology Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology Thank you very much for watching this video! --

Jewish Iraqi Food - AMAZING Eating Tour of Ramla Market!

Jewish Iraqi Food - AMAZING Eating Tour of Ramla Market!

►Follow David on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the.hungry.tourist/ and Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thehungrytourist/ ►Subscribe - http://bit.ly/MarkWiensSubscribe ►T-shirts - https://migrationology.com/store/ Among food lovers, Ramla Market is one of the best known places to eat. It’s located about a 30 minute drive from the center of Tel Aviv, and along with my friend David, we headed there one morning to go on an amazing food tour. Ramla Market is especially known for its variety of Turkish and Iraqi food influences, and it’s just an amazing food market. Halil Restaurant - The first place we stopped in Ramla is Halil, another legendary hummus restaurant. But even better than their hummus for me, I loved their musabaha, raw tahini with whole chickpeas. Total price - 60 ILS ($16.76) Prickly pear - Oddly, prickly pear which is originally from SW United States is very popular across Israel. The fruit vendor peeled me a prickly pear, which is full of seeds, but pretty good. Turkish burekas - One of the popular street food snacks at Ramla Market is Turkish burekas, a snack that’s also common throughout the Balkans. They were really amazingly good, a perfect salty cheesy snack. Price - 5 ILS ($1.40) per piece Naji Iraqi Restaurant - This is one of the highlights of the market for me, a family run Iraqi Jewish food restaurant. David explained to me that Iraqi Jewish food is so hard to find at restaurants because most people only make the dishes at home. There were definitely some dishes that I had never tried before, and it was an amazing meal. Total price - 200 ILS ($55.88) Again, big thank you to David, go check out his amazing food adventures: https://www.instagram.com/the.hungry.tourist/ ***CAMERA GEAR*** used to make this video (these are affiliate links): Main camera GH5: http://amzn.to/2sV0XQO Main lens: http://amzn.to/2szLZNf 2nd lens: http://amzn.to/2mcEGau Microphone: http://amzn.to/2rBKD3z Tripod: http://amzn.to/2rBFkkI I would love to connect with you! Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology T-shirts available now: https://migrationology.com/store/ Thank you for watching!

You Never Seen This Type Of Biryani Making | Muslim Mutton Briyani | Street Food

You Never Seen This Type Of Biryani Making | Muslim Mutton Briyani | Street Food

You Never Seen This Type Of Biryani Making | Mutton Briyani | Street Food Subscribe for More Videos ►- https://goo.gl/XvQT4W Like and Follow ►- https://www.youtube.com/KIKTV Network Like and Follow ►- https://www.facebook.com/KIKTV Network

The Ultimate JERUSALEM FOOD TOUR + Attractions - Palestinian Food and Israeli Food in Old Jerusalem!

The Ultimate JERUSALEM FOOD TOUR + Attractions - Palestinian Food and Israeli Food in Old Jerusalem!

Join us on the ultimate Jerusalem food tour! Follow David on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the.hungry.tourist/ Also, thanks to Rafram: http://rafram.com/ Subscribe for more videos► http://bit.ly/MarkWiensSubscribe T-shirts for sale here► https://migrationology.com/store/ There are few cities in the world that can compare to Jerusalem in terms of ancient history and religious significance. It’s one of the most fascinating cities in the world, and it’s a city that I’ve wanted to visit my entire life. Finally, along with my friend David (https://www.instagram.com/the.hungry.tourist/) and Rafram, we explored Jerusalem to discover the food treasures the city has to offer - and let me tell you, you’ll find some incredibly delicious food in Jerusalem! We started off the Jerusalem food tour by first walking around East Jerusalem and starting with the best plate of hummus I’ve ever had. We then toured around Old Jerusalem, and enjoyed some incredible Palestinian food kebabs cooked by an incredible man who cooked with serious love and passion. Another highlight in Jerusalem was the mutabak, a thin pastry stuffed with cheese and baked. After eating our way through Old Jerusalem, we then headed into West Jerusalem and went to lunch at an Israeli Jewish restaurant serving a mix of amazing dishes. The food was home-cooked in style, and absolutely sensation. A few more snacks and sightseeing throughout the afternoon, and that brought us all the way to dinner where David had made reservations to eat at one of the hottest restaurants in Jerusalem, Machneyuda Restaurant. It was quite an experience, and an amazing meal and lively atmosphere to wrap up this ultimate Jerusalem food tour. Here’s all the food and places included in this Palestinian food and Israeli food tour of Jerusalem: Hummus Acramawi Price - 20 ILS ($5.57) per plate Almond juice - 3.90 ILS ($1.09) Al-shuala Grill Restaurant Shawarma - 26 ILS ($7.26) Al Baghdadi Kabab Palestinian kebabs Total price - 100 ILS ($27.89) Zalatimo Sweets Mutabak Price - 30 ILS ($8.37) each Peaches - 10 for 1 kg Plums - 10 for 1 kg Fruit - 10 ILS ($2.76) per kg. Mahane Yehuda Market Azura Restaurant Total price - 400 ILS ($111.55) Western Wall (Wailing Wall) Western Wall Tunnel Price - 35 ILS ($9.76) per person Dome of the Rock Mount of Olives Machneyuda Restaurant Total price - 700 ILS ($195.21) It was a lot of food in a single day, but it was one of the greatest food and learning days that I’ve ever had in my life. The generosity of the people we connected with, paired with the food, was truly a memorable experience in Jerusalem. Thank you again to David (https://www.instagram.com/the.hungry.tourist/) and Rafram for showing me some of the best food in Jerusalem! - MUSIC in This Video: Souls of Time, Arabian Feast - https://goo.gl/HwVjdo CAMERA GEAR used to make this video (these are affiliate links): GH5: http://amzn.to/2sV0XQO Main lens: http://amzn.to/2szLZNf 2nd lens: http://amzn.to/2mcEGau Microphone: http://amzn.to/2rBKD3z Tripod: http://amzn.to/2rBFkkI I would love to connect with you! Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology T-shirts available now: https://migrationology.com/store/ Thank you for watching!

Ancient MAYAN FOOD - Jungle Cooking in MAYA VILLAGE in Quintana Roo, Mexico!

Ancient MAYAN FOOD - Jungle Cooking in MAYA VILLAGE in Quintana Roo, Mexico!

Ancient Mayan food in Quintana Roo, Mexico! ►SUBSCRIBE for 2 new videos per week: http://bit.ly/MarkWiensSubscribe ►T-shirts available now: https://migrationology.com/store/ One of the experiences I really wanted to have when I visit the Quintana Roo state of Mexico, was to learn about, cook, and eat authentic ancient Mayan food. So we rented a van, and drove over to the small jungle Mayan village of Chunhuhub, to meet up with Kíichpam K'áax (https://selvabonita.com/en/home/), who are aiming to preserve their Mayan culture. It was about a 3.5 hour drive to get to Chunhuhub from Playa Del Carmen, so by the time we arrived we were all pretty hungry. We walked through the milpa (Mesoamerican crop growing system), and finally to the kitchen within the jungle of the property. They were already busy cooking, preparing a few traditional Mayan foods, like a variety of tamales and cochinita pibil. They prepared everything to be cooked in the pib, the ancient Mayan traditional way of cooking - an underground hot rock oven (there are many cultures around the world who have used or still use a similar underground cooking technique). Tok-sel - One of the most fascinating dishes they cooked was white beans, and they took a hot rock out of the fire, stuck it into the pan with the beans, and roasted them with the rock. It was incredible to see, and the beans had an incredible ummai flavor to them. They were delicious especially when paired with freshly made corn tortillas. Achiote (annatto) - An interesting ingredients, used commonly in Mayan food and cooking, is achiote, a pod filled with red / orange fruit. It has a slight pepper and lemony taste, and also makes everything that uses it, bright orange. Cochinita pibil - One of the main ingredients in cochinita pibil is achiote. They had pre-marinated it, and it cooked underground as well. The flavor of the pork was amazing, and with tortillas, onions, and salsa, it was truly support. We had a number of different tamales as well, all of which were totally different from any tamales I’ve ever had. They were hearty and packed full of corn and beans, and very filling. They were a little on the dry side, but I fully enjoyed learning about them, and watching them being made. The different leaves, including the hoja santa, was great to learn about. Special thanks to Centro Ecoturistico Kíichpam K'áax (https://selvabonita.com/en/home/) for putting everything together. They have an eco lodge and offer various off the beaten path activities like this. Map data ©2018 Google Thank you for watching this food in Mexico - ancient Mayan food video. It was an incredible experience to learn, cook, and eat, traditional Mayan food! MUSIC: https://www.audionetwork.com/ ***CAMERA GEAR*** I used to make this video (these are affiliate links): Main camera: http://amzn.to/2sV0XQO Main lens: http://amzn.to/2szLZNf 2nd lens: http://amzn.to/2EjBeEg Microphone: http://amzn.to/2rBKD3z Drone: http://amzn.to/2CrtAHz I would love to connect with you! Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology T-shirts available now: https://migrationology.com/store/

Thai Food at Tha Kha Floating Market (ตลาดน้ำท่าคา) - Don't Miss Aunty's Fried Oyster Omelet!

Thai Food at Tha Kha Floating Market (ตลาดน้ำท่าคา) - Don't Miss Aunty's Fried Oyster Omelet!

►Read the blog for details on how you can visit Tha Kha Floating Market: https://migrationology.com/tha-kha-floating-market-thailand/ ►Subscribe now for more food videos: http://bit.ly/MarkWiensSubscribe ►Camera gear I use: https://goo.gl/mKNy7K There are many floating markets you can visit when you’re in Thailand, and even there are some floating markets located right within Bangkok that are very nice (Khlong Lat Mayom is very nice in Bangkok: https://migrationology.com/best-floating-market-in-bangkok/). Then there are also many floating markets about a 1 or 1.5 hour drive from Bangkok in a province called Samut Songkhram. In Samut Songkhram there are a number of other famous floating markets. Damnoen Saduak is the most famous of all, and it’s very touristy and gets very packed on the weekend. Amphawa is another Thai floating market that’s big and busy. But I wanted to go to a quieter and more peaceful floating market, so we decided to go to Tha Kha Floating Market (ตลาดน้ำท่าคา), located very close to Amphawa. It was my first time to visit Tha Kha Floating Market (ตลาดน้ำท่าคา), and I was pleasantly surprised by how small, friendly, and local it was. There’s not a whole lot to do, but there are plenty of floating boats serving food and you can also buy lots of fresh ingredients which come from this area. Along with plenty of Thai food snacks I ate during this tour of Tha Kha Floating Market (ตลาดน้ำท่าคา), the best thing was the hoy tod (หอยทอด), a fried oyster omelet. There’s something about eating an oily fried oyster omelet when you go to a floating market - it’s kind of like going to a sports game and eating a hot dog - they just go so well together. I also enjoyed the fruits available at the market, especially starfruit, which was likely picked right off the tree of the lady who was selling it. When you’re in Thailand, if you want to go to a quiet and peaceful floating market that’s not overly busy and still remains quite local Tha Kha Floating Market (ตลาดน้ำท่าคา) is an amazing option. Get all the details for how to get there on the blog post here: https://migrationology.com/tha-kha-floating-market-thailand/ -- GEAR I USE: Main camera I use: http://amzn.to/2dEL3hv Main lens: http://amzn.to/2e5Lum6 Microphone: http://amzn.to/2dEr9Z9 Gorillapod: http://amzn.to/2epFsQx *These are Amazon affiliate links MY WEBSITES: Migrationology.com: https://migrationology.com/ Get e-mail updates: https://migrationology.com/free-updates SOCIAL MEDIA: Snapchat: @migrationology Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology SUPPORT MY WIFE AND I: Donate: https://migrationology.com/donate/ T-shirts: https://migrationology.com/store/ --

Jordanian Food and the Best Falafel I've Had!

Jordanian Food and the Best Falafel I've Had!

Check out my Jordanian food guide here: https://migrationology.com/jordanian-food/ On Day 2 (which was actually the same morning we arrived, so it was really our first day in Amman), we didn’t do much other than eat some incredibly delicious Jordanian food. After having a quick breakfast at the hotel, which I showed in the first video, we then took a nap. In the early afternoon, we got started for the day, by having some of the most incredible falafel I’ve ever had in my life, and proceeding to have a few snacks, followed by an amazing Jordanian meal for dinner. Here’s a more details looks at what we did on Day 2 of our Jordan trip. 1:02 Falafel Al-Quds - For our first food stop in Amman we went to a famous place called Falafel Al-Quds, known for serving falafel sandwiches on sesame seed buns. I haven’t had all that much falafel in my life, but these were definitely some of the best falafel I’ve ever had in my life. I had the sesame seed falafel sandwich which came filled with falafel, tomatoes, tahini, chili, and some small spices and seasoning. It was simple but incredibly delicious. Sesame seed bun - 0.75 JD ($1.05) 4:56 Gerard Ice Cream - Next we walked down Rainbow street in Amman, which by the way has some fantastic little Jordanian restaurants and cafe, and stopped off at Gerard ice cream where I tried ar Arabic ice cream which is flavored by Arabic gum. It tastes sort of like a combination of vanilla and caramel. 1.70 JD ($2.39) 6:00 Wild Jordan Cafe - After walking around Amman for a bit and getting some good exercise walking around the hills, we then stopped off at Wild Jordan Cafe to hang out for a bit, drink some coffee and tea, and enjoy the great atmosphere for the cafe and of the Amman Citadel over on the next hill. It’s a really nice cafe in Amman if you’re looking to hang out. 7:26 The Delights Shop - We headed to a certain area of Amman to go to a place called The Delights Shop, known throughout Amman for having incredible dates. While they did have a selection of plain dates, they mostly had a variety of different chocolate covered dates. I had a mint chocolate covered date, which was very sweet and rich and very good. The Delights Shop in Amman is a little high end, but is a good place if you’re looking for chocolate covered dates. 8:30 Al Osrah Restaurant - Along with eating falafel, our Jordanian food local style dinner at Al Osrah restaurant was definitely the highlight of our first full day of exploring and eating in Amman. This local restaurant served all the typical dishes including hummus, moutabel, falafel again, and a dish that I particularly enjoyed - fattet hummus - which is bread that’s soaked until is basically dissolves, and mixed with hummus. While hummus is dense and creamy, the fattet hummus was much lighter and almost had the fluffy consistency of whipped cream. Our meal at Al Osrah was excellent, if you have a chance to eat there when you’re in Amman, the food they serve is wonderful. 13:01 Temriyeh Omar - For our final food stop in Amman, we went to a local spot known as Temriyeh Omar to have a Jordanian dessert called temriyeh, which is a then layer of dough, like a roti, filled with a slice of semolina cake, wrapped up into a little packet, and deep fried to a crisp. Once it’s taken out of the hot oil, it’s then dusted in powdered sugar. It was sweet, but very good. -- Check out my travel tips and visiting recommendations for Amman, Jordan: http://migrationology.com/travel-guides/amman-jordan/ (Including where to stay, what to see, safety information, and extra tips) MY WEBSITES: Migrationology.com: http://migrationology.com/ EatingThaiFood.com: http://eatingthaifood.com/ TravelByYing.com: http://travelbyying.com/ T-shirts & Food Guides: https://migrationology.com/store/ Resources: http://migrationology.com/travel-resources/ SOCIAL MEDIA: Snapchat: @migrationology Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology Thank you very much for watching this video! --

FLAMING BEEF and EGGS! - Must-Eat Cambodian Street Food Dish in Phnom Penh!

FLAMING BEEF and EGGS! - Must-Eat Cambodian Street Food Dish in Phnom Penh!

Subscribe for more videos► http://bit.ly/MarkWiensSubscribe T-shirts for sale here► https://migrationology.com/store/ Just across the street from Central Market in Phnom Penh, you’ll find an amazing local spot for lunch that serves Cambodian flaming beef in a cow shaped pan. They light the cast iron skillets on fire, and then toss in some beef, seasoning, onions, eggs, and finish it off with some sauces and green onions. One of the best things about the dish is watching them being made and the lady that makes them could probably do it with her eyes closed, she’s done it so many times. You eat the flaming beef pan and juices with rice, and it goes perfectly together, especially with some extra added chilies and chili sauce. We ate here on a spur of the moment, just walking by in Phnom Penh and looking for something delicious to eat, and it turned out to be a must eat in Phnom Penh. Not sure of the name of this place in English, but here’s the Khmer: ភោជនីយដ្ឋាន បាយគោដុត Address: Preah Chey Chetha St. (118), Phnom Penh, Cambodia (On the corner of Street 61 and Street 118) Total price - 30,500 KHR ($7.36) for 5 pans and side dishes Puffed rice - 2,000 KHR (0.48) -- Music in this video: Not This Time https://goo.gl/HwVjdo MY CAMERA GEAR: Main camera: http://amzn.to/2dEL3hv Main lens: http://amzn.to/2e5Lum6 2nd camera: http://amzn.to/2mczuDx 2nd lens: http://amzn.to/2mcEGau Microphone: http://amzn.to/2dEr9Z9 Gorillapod: http://amzn.to/2epFsQx *These are Amazon affiliate links I would love to connect with you! Instagram: https://instagram.com/migrationology Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/migrationology T-shirts available now: https://migrationology.com/store/ -- ►Subscribe to my channel for more videos: http://bit.ly/MarkWiensSubscribe

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